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Research make light work of fixing broken bones

Artificial bone, created using stem cells and a new lightweight plastic, could soon be used to heal shattered limbs.

The use of bone stem cells combined with a degradable rigid material that inserts into broken bones and encourages real bone to re-grow has been developed at the Universities of Edinburgh and Southampton.

Researchers have developed the material with a honeycomb scaffold structure that allows blood to flow through it, enabling stem cells from the patient's bone marrow to attach to the material and grow new bone. Over time, the plastic slowly degrades as the implant is replaced by newly grown bone.

Scientists developed the material by blending three types of plastics. They used a pioneering technique to blend and test hundreds of combinations of plastics, to identify a blend that was robust, lightweight, and able to support bone stem cells.

Successful results have been shown in the lab and in animal testing with the focus now moving towards human clinical evaluation. The study, published in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, was funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

This new discovery is the result of a seven-year partnership between the University of Southampton and the University of Edinburgh.

Richard Oreffo, Professor of Musculoskeletal Science at the University of Southampton, comments: "Fractures and bone loss due to trauma or disease are a significant clinical and socioeconomic problem. This collaboration between chemistry and medicine has identified unique candidate materials that support human bone stem cell growth and allow bone formation. Our collaborative strategy offers significant therapeutic implications."

Professor Mark Bradley, of the University of Edinburgh's School of Chemistry, adds: "We were able to make and look at a hundreds of candidate materials and rapidly whittle these down to one which is strong enough to replace bone and is also a suitable surface upon which to grow new bone.

"We are confident that this material could soon be helping to improve the quality of life for patients with severe bone injuries, and will help maintain the health of an ageing population."

ENDS

Notes to editors

For more information please contact: Professor Mark Bradley, University of Edinburgh School of Chemistry, tel: 01316 504820, email: mark.bradley@ed.ac.uk. Catriona Kelly, University of Edinburgh Press and PR Office, tel: 01316 514401, email: catriona.kelly@ed.ac.uk. Becky Attwood, Media Relations, University of Southampton, tel: 07545 422512 or 02380 595457, email: r.attwood@soton.ac.uk, website: www.soton.ac.uk/mediacentre.

About BBSRC

BBSRC invests in world-class bioscience research and training on behalf of the UK public. Our aim is to further scientific knowledge, to promote economic growth, wealth and job creation and to improve quality of life in the UK and beyond.

Funded by Government, and with an annual budget of around £500M (2012-2013), we support research and training in universities and strategically funded institutes. BBSRC research and the people we fund are helping society to meet major challenges, including food security, green energy and healthier, longer lives. Our investments underpin important UK economic sectors, such as farming, food, industrial biotechnology and pharmaceuticals.

For more information about BBSRC, our science and our impact see: www.bbsrc.ac.uk.
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