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Male Reproductive

All sperm are not equal

An experimental study from researchers at Uppsala University provides evidence that in Atlantic salmon, selection acting upon sperm phenotypes within a single ...

Unified legal process needed for IVF with dead men's sperm

A University of Adelaide medical law expert is calling for a unified legal process to deal with assisted reproductive treatments involving a ...

Dads: how important are they?

New MUHC research highlights the value of fathers in both neurobiology and behaviour of offspring ... Full story

More or less equal? How men factor into the reproductive equation

By Bess Connolly Martell - Researchers know a lot about how women’s bodily health affects their fertility, but less is known about how men’s health affects reproductive outcomes. Yale researcher Rene Almeling and co-author Miranda R. Waggoner of Princeton address this discrepancy in a study published today in the journal Gender & Society. In the period before conception, family health history and current health behaviors matter for women and men alike, say the researchers, adding that more clinical research needs to be done on how men’s bodily health affects their sperm, and in turn, reproductive health outcomes. “The lack of attention to men in research on reproduction leaves open many important questions, including how men’s reproductive contributions are understood,” say the researchers. The vast majority of medical and social science research on reproduction focuses on women. It wasn’t until recently that scientists began studying the role that men’s behavior and men’s health play in reproductive outcomes, such as fetal health, birth defects, and childhood diseases. The stereotypical association of women with family and men with work has led to a focus on women’s bodies in reproduction, leaving the question of how men’s health contributes to reproduction unanswered. “What kinds of advice, if any, do men receive about preparing their bodies for reproduction?” ask the researchers. “Men should be empowered with information about how their age, health history, and unhealthy behaviors can affect pregnancy outcomes.” The sperm bank is one of the few places where men’s reproductive health takes center stage, the researchers note. At sperm banks, men are counseled on healthy eating, avoiding stress, and reducing alcohol consumption. Not adhering to this advice can and does lead to lower sperm counts, suggesting that this kind of guidance might be more broadly useful for men trying to conceive children with their partners. By Bess Connolly Martell - Researchers know a lot about how women’s bodily health affects their fertility, but less is known about how men’s health affects reproductive outcomes. Yale researcher Rene Almeling and co-author Miranda R. Waggoner of Princeton address this discrepancy in a study published today in the journal Gender & Society. ... Full story

Dual protein knockout could lead to new male contraceptive

A new male contraceptive could be on the horizon after scientists identified a novel way to block the transport of sperm during ejaculation. ... Full story

Study suggests why, in some species, mere presence of males shortens females’ lifespan

BY KRISTA CONGER - Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have discovered that males of the laboratory roundworm secrete signaling molecules that significantly shorten the lifespan of the opposite sex. ... Full story

Nanoparticles to probe mystery sperm defects behind infertility

A way of using nanoparticles to investigate the mechanisms underlying 'mystery' cases of infertility has been developed by scientists at Oxford University. ... Full story

Circumcisions in older boys and related costs skyrocket in Florida, UF Health study shows

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Circumcisions in Florida boys over the age of 1 have increased dramatically in recent years, doubling costs to the state, a study by University of Florida Health surgical researchers shows. ... Full story

Sticky sperm could hold fertility key

Researchers from the University of Leeds think that sticky sperm could hold the key to greater success for couples undergoing IVF treatment. ... Full story

Sperm speed linked to paternity success

When it comes to paternity success in salmon it's the speed of sperm that counts, according to a collaborative study by researchers from The University of Western Australia and the University of Otago in New Zealand. ... Full story

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