04:28pm Tuesday 07 July 2020

Allegheny Health Network Physicians Advance Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease

PITTSBURGH –  Physicians  at Allegheny Health Network are among the first in the state to use a new drug-eluting stent to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common, serious condition in which plaque buildups block the flow of blood to the legs.

Drug-eluting stents offer patients a treatment that is more effective and less invasive than many of the options currently available to patients, said Gustav R. Eles, DO, an Allegheny Health Network interventional cardiologist.

“We are excited  to offer this innovative new treatment to patients suffering from PAD,” said Dr. Eles “It is as safe as traditional angioplasty and recent studies have shown it to be significantly more effective at reducing complications associated with this disease.“

Alberta Latella, a 74-year-old great-grandmother and retired nurse from the Pittsburgh suburb of Ingram, had one of the first drug-eluting stents placed in a right leg artery about two months ago at Allegheny General Hospital. She’s had several blocked leg arteries treated with traditional methods, and said she immediately felt a positive difference with the drug-eluting stents.

“My walking is much improved since the new stent was placed,” Mrs. Latella said. “The leg feels better than it has after previous surgeries. My foot, which was always cold, now feels warmer.”
Drug-eluting stents have revolutionized the treatment of coronary artery disease since being introduced in the United States in 2003. Studies have confirmed they are more effective than bare metal stents in helping patients avoid major cardiac events such as a heart attack, as well as repeat procedures. An estimated two million people have a stent placed every year, avoiding the need for open-heart bypass surgery to relieve artery blockages.

PAD, also called claudication or peripheral vascular disease, affects an estimated 10 to 12 million Americans. Leg pain while walking is the most common symptom, as the blocked artery slows the blood flow needed for increased activity. Smoking is a major risk factor for PAD, along with older age and diabetes.

Standard treatments for PAD include risk factor modification (such as quitting smoking or lowering blood pressure), exercise, medication, angioplasty with a bare metal stent or balloon, and bypass surgery.  Recurrence rates are high for the standard methods of angioplasty, up to 25-30 percent.

The Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent, developed by Cook Medical, was more effective in clinical trials than balloon angioplasty in treating PAD and less likely to require a repeat procedure than non-drug-eluting stents.

Four-year data presented at the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe meeting in October 2013 showed that 83.2 percent of patients treated with Zilver PTX did not require a repeat procedure, compared with 69.4 percent of patients treated with bare metal stents or other traditional treatment.

Surgeons insert the drug-eluting stent via a small puncture in the groin, guiding it to the blocked artery via a catheter. The stent then expands like a scaffold to keep the artery open. The stent is coated with paclitaxel, a drug that prevents recurrent narrowing of the arteries.

Mrs. Latella stayed in the hospital overnight, and walked out the next day with no assistance. She’s busy being a mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.

“We believe the drug-eluting stents will eventually become the standard of care for PAD and help patients avoid serious complications such as skin ulcers, gangrene and even limb amputation,” Dr. Eles said.

Allegheny Health Network physicians using the new stents include David Lasorda, DO; Mark Wholey, MD; Ramzi Khalil, MD; Mithun Chacravarthy, MD, and Matthew Becker, MD.

For more information about PAD treatment at AHN or the new Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent therapy, call 412-DOCTORS.

For more information, contact:
Stephanie Waite
The West Penn Allegheny Health System
412-330-4434
[email protected]
– See more at: http://www.wpahs.org/news/2-13-2014/allegheny-health-network-physicians-advance-treatment-peripheral-arterial-disease#sthash.nCgiJOEn.dpuf

Clinical Studies Show New Drug Eluting Stent May Improve Outcomes for Estimated 10 Million Americans Who Suffer From Dangerous Condition
PITTSBURGH – (Feb. 13, 2014) Physicians  at Allegheny Health Network are among the first in the state to use a new drug-eluting stent to treat peripheral arterial disease (PAD), a common, serious condition in which plaque buildups block the flow of blood to the legs.
Drug-eluting stents offer patients a treatment that is more effective and less invasive than many of the options currently available to patients, said Gustav R. Eles, DO, an Allegheny Health Network interventional cardiologist.
“We are excited  to offer this innovative new treatment to patients suffering from PAD,” said Dr. Eles “It is as safe as traditional angioplasty and recent studies have shown it to be significantly more effective at reducing complications associated with this disease.“
Alberta Latella, a 74-year-old great-grandmother and retired nurse from the Pittsburgh suburb of Ingram, had one of the first drug-eluting stents placed in a right leg artery about two months ago at Allegheny General Hospital. She’s had several blocked leg arteries treated with traditional methods, and said she immediately felt a positive difference with the drug-eluting stents.
“My walking is much improved since the new stent was placed,” Mrs. Latella said. “The leg feels better than it has after previous surgeries. My foot, which was always cold, now feels warmer.”
Drug-eluting stents have revolutionized the treatment of coronary artery disease since being introduced in the United States in 2003. Studies have confirmed they are more effective than bare metal stents in helping patients avoid major cardiac events such as a heart attack, as well as repeat procedures. An estimated two million people have a stent placed every year, avoiding the need for open-heart bypass surgery to relieve artery blockages.
PAD, also called claudication or peripheral vascular disease, affects an estimated 10 to 12 million Americans. Leg pain while walking is the most common symptom, as the blocked artery slows the blood flow needed for increased activity. Smoking is a major risk factor for PAD, along with older age and diabetes.
Standard treatments for PAD include risk factor modification (such as quitting smoking or lowering blood pressure), exercise, medication, angioplasty with a bare metal stent or balloon, and bypass surgery.  Recurrence rates are high for the standard methods of angioplasty, up to 25-30 percent.
The Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent, developed by Cook Medical, was more effective in clinical trials than balloon angioplasty in treating PAD and less likely to require a repeat procedure than non-drug-eluting stents.
Four-year data presented at the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe meeting in October 2013 showed that 83.2 percent of patients treated with Zilver PTX did not require a repeat procedure, compared with 69.4 percent of patients treated with bare metal stents or other traditional treatment.
Surgeons insert the drug-eluting stent via a small puncture in the groin, guiding it to the blocked artery via a catheter. The stent then expands like a scaffold to keep the artery open. The stent is coated with paclitaxel, a drug that prevents recurrent narrowing of the arteries.
Mrs. Latella stayed in the hospital overnight, and walked out the next day with no assistance. She’s busy being a mother, grandmother and great-grandmother.
“We believe the drug-eluting stents will eventually become the standard of care for PAD and help patients avoid serious complications such as skin ulcers, gangrene and even limb amputation,” Dr. Eles said.
Allegheny Health Network physicians using the new stents include David Lasorda, DO; Mark Wholey, MD; Ramzi Khalil, MD; Mithun Chacravarthy, MD, and Matthew Becker, MD.
For more information about PAD treatment at AHN or the new Zilver PTX drug-eluting stent therapy, call 412-DOCTORS.
For more information, contact:

– See more at: http://www.wpahs.org/news/2-13-2014/allegheny-health-network-physicians-advance-treatment-peripheral-arterial-disease#sthash.nCgiJOEn.dpuf


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