05:10am Sunday 24 September 2017

Rapid, More Sensitive Test Speeds Up Chest Pain Triage

The Biomarkers in Acute Cardiovascular Care (BACC) study, presented as a Hot Line at ESC Congress 2015, suggests this new algorithm can reduce mortality and cut triage times to one hour, compared to the standard three-hour approach.

“There is an urgent need for fast decision-making for this growing patient population,” said principal investigator of the study Dirk Westermann, MD, PhD, from the University Heart Centre Hamburg,  and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research.  

“Use of this algorithm in patients with suspected AMI allows for highly accurate and rapid rule-out as well as rule-in, enabling safe discharge or rapid treatment initiation. This rapid algorithm might be applicable to clinical practice without a loss of diagnostic safety.”

For patients with suspected AMI, current guidelines recommend analysing cardiac troponin I – a marker of myocyte (cardiac muscle cell) necrosis – directly at admission and then 3 hours later, to determine if the level warrants admission or discharge.

This means patients must remain in the hospital for at least 3 hours before receiving a diagnosis, using resources that are increasingly scarce.
In addition, troponin I levels are currently considered abnormal if they are above the 99th percentile from a healthy reference population – in this case 27 ng/L, said Dr. Westermann.

But new, highly sensitive troponin I assays can give results more quickly and detect more subtle troponin I elevations that may be important for assessing cardiovascular risk, he explained.

The BACC (Biomarkers in Acute Cardiovascular Care) study included 1,045 patients (mean age 65 years) with acute chest pain suggestive of AMI presenting at the emergency room of the university hospital in Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.

Patients were assessed using both the standard 3-hour assay as well as a highly-sensitive 1-hour one.

Based on the standard approach, 184 patients were diagnosed with AMI and kept in the hospital, while the rest were discharged home. All patients were then followed for 6 months.

Comparing the results of both assays in the cohort, the researchers calculated the best troponin I cut-off value to rule out AMI was 6 ng/L – “far lower than the currently recommended 27 ng/L,” noted Dr. Westermann.

They then tested the clinical relevance of this new cut-off for predicting cardiovascular events using data from the BiomarCaRE study – one of the largest studies to include troponin I measurement in more than 75,000 individuals from the general population.

The BiomarCaRE data confirmed that when individuals from the general population had troponin I values higher than 6 ng/L, they were at increased risk of death or cardiovascular disease, whereas patients with levels below this cut-off could be safely discharged home.

“This documents that even slightly elevated troponin I values are important predictors of cardiovascular disease,” said Professor Westermann. “At the same time, utilising a very low cut-off for discharge of patients with suggestive AMI is safe, since these patients are at the lowest possible risk for future events.

The researchers then applied the new cut-offs to the BAAC cohort and found that mortality would have been lower if patients had been triaged with the new algorithm compared to the routine 3-hour approach.

“The standard approach underestimated risk for many patients and resulted in high mortality,” said Dr. Westermann. “In addition, using the rapid, sensitive assay would have reduced usage of the emergency room and scarce medical resources, enabling a faster diagnosis and better treatment.”

The algorithm had negative predictive values of 99.7% after 1 hour and 100% after 3 hours.

“Therefore, our algorithm identified all patients at risk, but was not un-necessarily unspecific,” said Dr. Westermann.

“This suggests that using more sensitive cut-offs than suggested by the guidelines can improve the safety for patients discharged home.”

The algorithm was then validated in two independent cohorts (ADAPT and APACE trials) that included 4,009 patients with acute chest pain suggestive of AMI.
 
– ENDS-

 

Notes to editor

 

SOURCES OF FUNDING: The research was supported by the German Center of Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), the European Union Seventh Framework Programme, and an unrestricted grant by Abbott Diagnostics. Abbott Diagnostics provided test reagents for high-sensitive troponin I measurements.
DISCLOSURES:
Dr. Westermann and his colleagues declared no conflicts of interest regarding this study.

 

The press conference timetable is available here

 

* Non Hot Line releases will be available under embargo on AlphaGalileo and EurekAlert a few days before ESC Congress. Hot Line releases will only be available when the embargo is lifted, online and on-site

 

* ESC Congress 2015 will take place from 29 August to 2 September at ExCeL London in London, UK
* Information on Hot Line sessions is available here 
* Information on the scientific programme is available here

 

ESC Press Office
For background information or assistance, please contact the ESC Press Office.
For independent comment on site or interviews, please contact the ESC spokesperson coordinator: +44 7785 467 947

About the European Society of Cardiology
The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) represents more than 90 000 cardiology professionals across Europe and worldwide. Its mission is to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe.
 
About ESC Congress 2015
ESC Congress is the world’s largest and most influential cardiovascular event contributing to global awareness of the latest clinical trials and breakthrough discoveries. ESC Congress 2015 takes place 29 August to 2 September at ExCel London in London, UK. Access the scientific programme. More information is available from the ESC Press Office at press@escardio.org.

To access all the scientific resources from the sessions during the congress, visit ESC Congress 365.  

This press release accompanies both a presentation and an ESC press conference at the ESC Congress 2015. Edited by the ESC from material supplied by the investigators themselves, this press release does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the European Society of Cardiology. The content of the press release has been approved by the presenter.


Share on:
or:

Health news