10:34pm Tuesday 19 September 2017

Sex and musculoskeletal health: differences between males and females extend to their bone and joint conditions

ROSEMONT, Ill.—Woman in general have a higher incidence of osteoporosis-related hip fractures yet, conversely, they have a lower rate of mortality than men with the same fracture, according to a study in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). In addition, doctors don’t always recognize or treat osteoporosis in men as often as they do in women.
 
“Male and Female Differences Matter in Musculoskeletal Disease” details the differences between how common musculoskeletal disorders manifest themselves in males versus females. The paper also underscores how important it is for healthcare professionals to understand those differences and recognize how multiple factors can contribute to musculoskeletal conditions and injuries.
 
“Knowing that there are differences in incidences and presentation between males and females is an important part of diagnosing and treating patients,” says orthopaedic surgeon Jennifer Moriatis Wolf, MD, the lead study author. “Identifying both similarities and differences will allow health care providers to deliver better care to every orthopaedic patient.”
 
There are differences between how males and females develop several common musculoskeletal disorders:
 

  • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are 2-8 times more common in females.
  • Females are 5-8 times more likely than males to suffer an ACL injury in high-intensity sports like soccer and basketball that require sudden changes of motion.
  • Ankle sprains are twice as common in females.
  • Osteoarthritis of the knee is more common in females.
  • Metacarpal and phalangeal (finger) fractures are more common in males.

 
Recognition of these differences can contribute to better care of individual patients and to a higher index of suspicion for injury for certain diagnoses such as ACL tears.
 
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ROSEMONT, Ill.—Women in general have a higher incidence of osteoporosis-related hip fractures yet, they have a lower rate of mortality than men with the same fracture, according to a study in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). In addition, doctors don’t always recognize or treat osteoporosis in men as often as in women.
 
“Male and Female Differences Matter in Musculoskeletal Disease” details the differences between how common musculoskeletal disorders manifest themselves in males versus females. The paper also underscores how important it is, for healthcare professionals to understand those differences and recognize how multiple factors can contribute to musculoskeletal conditions and injuries.
 
“Knowing that there are differences in incidences and presentation between males and females is an important part of diagnosing and treating patients,” says orthopaedic surgeon Jennifer Moriatis Wolf, MD, the lead study author. “Identifying both similarities and differences will allow health care providers to deliver better care to every orthopaedic patient.”
 
There are differences between how males and females develop several common musculoskeletal disorders:
 

  • Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are 2-8 times more common in females.
  • Females are 5-8 times more likely than males to suffer an ACL injury in high-intensity sports like soccer and basketball that require sudden changes of motion.
  • Ankle sprains are twice as common in females.
  • Osteoarthritis of the knee is more common in females.
  • Metacarpal and phalangeal (finger) fractures are more common in males.

 
Recognition of these differences can contribute to better care of individual patients, and to a higher index of suspicion for injury for certain diagnoses such as ACL tears.
 

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June 2015 Full JAAOS Table of Contents

  • Editorial: Online Extra Publication in JAAOS
  • Open Surgical Release for Contractures of the Elbow
  • Male and Female Differences Matter in Musculoskeletal Disease
  • Medial Epicondylitis: Evaluation and Management
  • Infection Prevention in Total Knee Arthroplasty
  • Paralytic Ileus in the Orthopaedic Patient
  • Replantation of the Upper Extremity: Current Concepts
  • Atlantoaxial Rotatory Subluxation in Children

 
 
Orthopaedic surgeons restore mobility and reduce pain; they help people get back to work and to independent, productive lives. Visit ANationInMotion.org to read successful orthopaedic stories.
 
More information about the AAOS

 

Contact(s):
Sheryl Cash
phone: 847-384-4032
Kayee Ip
phone: 847-384-4035

 

Disclosures. Dr. Wolf or an immediate family member serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, the American Foundation for Surgery of the Hand, and the Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Cannada or an immediate family member is a member of a speakers’ bureau or has made paid presentations on behalf of Smith & Nephew; serves as a paid consultant to or is an employee of Zimmer; has received research or institutional support from Smith & Nephew, Synthes, and Zimmer; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association, and the Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Van Heest or an immediate family member serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American Orthopaedic Association, the American Society for Surgery of the Hand, and the Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society. Dr. O’Connor or an immediate family member serves as a paid consultant to or is an employee of Stryker and Zimmer; serves as an unpaid consultant to Accelatox; has stock or stock options held in Accelatox; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons and the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons. Dr. Ladd or an immediate family member has received royalties from Extremity Medical and Orthohelix; has stock or stock options held in Articulinx, Extremity Medical, Illuminos, and OsteoSpring Medical; has received research or institutional support from the National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases and National Institute of Child Health and Human Development) and the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society. Dr. Ladd also acknowledges support from the National Institutes of Health, Skeletal Biology Structure and Regeneration Study Section ([NIH/SBSR] 1R01AR059185 – 01A1), and from Thumb Carpometacarpal Biomechanics and Early Osteoarthritis Progression

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