09:02am Thursday 25 May 2017

Toward the first nose drops to treat brain cancer

Tomotaka Shingaki and colleagues note that brain cancer is difficult to treat, partly because current anticancer drugs have difficulty reaching the brain. That’s because the so-called blood-brain barrier (a protective layer of cells surrounding the brain) prevents medication in the blood from entering the brain. But new evidence indicates that some drugs administered through the nose, either as nose drops or nasal spray, can bypass this barrier and travel directly into the brain. Among them are drugs for migraine headaches. Until now, however, nobody knew if methotrexate might do the same.

The scientists tested methotrexate nose drops on laboratory rats with brain cancer. Compared to cancer treated with an injectable form of the drug, the nose drop drug reduced the weight of tumors by almost one-third, the scientists said. “The strategy to utilize the nose-brain direct transport can be applicable to a new therapeutic system not only for brain tumors but also for other central nervous system disorders such as neurodegenerative diseases,” the article noted.

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ARTICLE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
“Transnasal delivery of methotrexate to brain tumors in rats: A new strategy for brain tumor chemotherapy”

DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ARTICLE
http://pubs.acs.org/stoken/presspac/presspac/abs/10.1021/mp900275s

CONTACT:
Tomotaka Shingaki
ADME Research Inc.
Osaka, Japan
Phone: 81-72-749-3101
Fax: 81-72-749-3102
Email: t.shingaki@adme.jp

Contact: Michael Bernstein
m_bernstein@acs.org
202-872-6042
American Chemical Society


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