05:37am Saturday 23 September 2017

People with Stroke History Who Receive Clot-Busting Therapy Fare Better

“The use of these drugs, called thrombolytic therapy, can limit damage and disability due to blood clots,” said study author Kennedy R. Lees, MD, of the University of Glasgow in Scotland. “However, current guidelines can keep people from receiving the therapy if they have a history of stroke and diabetes.”

For the study, scientists gathered data from 23,062 people who received clot-busting therapy along with 6,166 people who did not receive clot-busting therapy. Measurements of how well people were able to function 90 days after the stroke were taken from both groups. A total of 19 percent of the people had diabetes and 17 percent had a prior stroke.

Stroke outcomes were measured on a scale of zero to six using the modified Rankin Scale. Zero represented no symptoms, three represented moderate disability meaning a person requires some help but is able to walk unassisted and a six indicated death.

The study found that 43 percent of people with diabetes who received the clot-busting therapy had a disability score of two or less, compared with only 34 percent of diabetes patients who did not receive the therapy. Additionally, the study found 48 percent of patients with previous stroke who received clot-busting therapy scored a two or less, compared with 35 percent of patients with previous stroke who did not receive the therapy.

“Better outcomes with therapy show that people with prior stroke or diabetes should not be excluded from receiving thrombolytic therapy,” said Lees.

The study was supported by the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive (VISTA), the University of Glasgow and the European Stroke Organization. VISTA is a not for profit collaboration of clinical scientists that aims to make clinical trial data available for further research.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 24,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy. For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com.

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