03:17pm Thursday 14 December 2017

New Research Reveals How α-Synuclein Interacts with Cell Membranes in Parkinson’s Disease

The accumulation of α-synuclein, a small, negatively charged protein, in neural cells, is one of the hallmarks of Parkinson’s disease. It has been suggested that oligomeric α-synuclein causes membranes to become permeable, or to form channels on the outer cell membrane. Now, a group of scientists from Sweden has found a way to reliably replicate α-synuclein aggregation on cell membranes to investigate how different forms of α-synuclein interact with membranes under different conditions and to learn if any of the α-synuclein species can penetrate these membranes. Their results are published in the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease.

“We found that on-pathway oligomers and α-synuclein fibrils associate with negatively charged model membranes.  Furthermore, when investigating seeded α-synuclein aggregation in the presence of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), we find lipid and α-synuclein co-localized in the GUV membrane,” explains lead author Marie Grey, of Lund University and the Wallenberg Neuroscience Center in Lund, Sweden. “Importantly, no transport of α-synuclein was seen, indicating that the ability of α-synuclein to enter cells is more complex than diffusive transport over cell membranes.” 

The scientists generated GUVs containing a small amount of a lipid-conjugated red emitting dye (rhodamine B) and varied the membrane charge by using different molecular ratios of phosphatidyl choline (DOPC), a common phospholipid in human cell membranes with a neutral charge, with the negatively charged lipids phosphatidyl serine (DOPS), a major component of the plasma membrane in human cells, or cardiolipin (CL), abundant in mitochondrial membranes.  They then used confocal fluorescence microcopy to examine how monomer, fibril, and on-pathway α-synuclein species labeled with a green emitting fluorophore interacted with phospholipid bilayers of the GUV.  The study achieved unique, reproducible aggregation without addition of stirring bars, chemicals, and vigorous shaking as had been used in previous studies. These gentler methods make the results more physiologically relevant while still yielding the desired reproducibility.

“On-pathway oligomers are difficult to isolate and enrich due to their dynamic nature.  Using our reproducible protocol, we could compare the outcome when adding the different species of α-synuclein to the GUVs,” notes Dr. Grey. 

The researchers found that on-pathway and aggregated forms of α-synuclein species bound to lipid membranes, but α-synuclein monomers did not.  α-synuclein was particularly strongly associated with GUVs containing the negatively charged anionic lipids CL or DOPS, but did not associate with GUVs containing only the neutrally charged DOPC.  α-synuclein progressively accumulated at the surface of the GUVs, typically in distinct areas rather than uniformly covering the membrane.  They did not observe transport of α-synuclein over the GUV bilayer.

“Our results indicate that alpha-synuclein does not readily traverse any biological lipid membrane, but that there most likely are required proteins that regulate the transport, possibly with some degree of specificity. This is good news for future attempts to develop treatments that prevent transport of synuclein across membranes, as proteins provide better drug targets than do lipid membrane constituents,” concludes Dr. Grey.

The article is “Membrane Interaction of α-Synuclein in Different Aggregation States,” by M. Grey, S. Linse, H. Nilsson, P. Brundin, and E. Sparr. Journal of Parkinson’s Disease. 1(2011) 359-371. DOI 10.3233/JPD-2011-11067. Published by IOS Press. 

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NOTES FOR EDITORS

Full text of the article is available to credentialed journalists.  Contact Daphne Watrin, IOS Press, Tel: +31 20 688 3355, d.watrin@iospress.nl. Journalists wishing to interview the authors should contact Marie Grey, PhD, Center for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Lund University at Marie.Grey@fkem1.lu.se.

ABOUT THE JOURNAL OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE (JPD)

Launched in June 2011 the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease is dedicated to providing an open forum for original research in basic science, translational research and clinical medicine that will expedite our fundamental understanding and improve treatment of Parkinson’s disease. The journal is international and multidisciplinary and aims to promote progress in the epidemiology, etiology, genetics, molecular correlates, pathogenesis, pharmacology, psychology, diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson’s disease. It publishes research reports, reviews, short communications, and letters-to-the-editor and offers very rapid publication and an affordable open access option. www.journalofparkinsonsdisease.com

ABOUT IOS PRESS

Commencing its publishing activities in 1987, IOS Press (www.iospress.nl) serves the information needs of scientific and medical communities worldwide. IOS Press now (co-)publishes over 100 international journals and about 130 book titles each year on subjects ranging from computer sciences and mathematics to medicine and the natural sciences.

IOS Press continues its rapid growth, embracing new technologies for the timely dissemination of information. All journals are available electronically and an e-book platform was launched in 2005.

Headquartered in Amsterdam with satellite offices in the USA, Germany, India and China, IOS Press has established several strategic co-publishing initiatives. Notable acquisitions included Delft University Press in 2005 and Millpress Science Publishers in 2008.


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