03:06am Saturday 18 November 2017

Brain consolidates memory with three-step brainwave

Bonnefond and Bergmann specialize in research on oscillations: waves of brain activity. ‘Non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is responsible for the memory consolidation during our sleep’, Bonnefond explains. ‘NREM is known for its very slow oscillations (SOs). Other types of oscillations are hidden inside these SOs. We discovered that three types of oscillations are nested inside each other in the hippocampus and have a joint function.’

Slow waves, spindles and ripples

Slow oscillations only happen about once per second (~0.75 Hz). In a specific time frame within these SOs, Bergmann, Bonnefond and their colleagues found clusters of oscillations of an intermediate speed: the so called spindles which happen about 15 times per second (12 – 16 Hz). And within these spindles, they found clusters of superfast oscillations called ripples, which happen about 90 times per second (80 – 100 Hz), and which reflect the local reactivation of the memory trace to be shuttled to the cortex.

Bonnefond

To summarize: SOs contain spindles, which in their turn contain ripples. ‘Earlier studies only coupled these oscillation types in pairs’, Bonnefond explains. ‘But now, we see that SOs, spindles and ripples are functionally coupled in the hippocampus. And we hypothesize that they provide fine-tuned temporal frames for the transfer of memory traces to the neocortex.’

Epilepsy

The group of researchers investigated the process in human epilepsy patients during natural sleep. Doctors were looking for the brain areas responsible for their epilepsy, and the current research was done at the same time: with special electrodes, the researchers recorded oscillations from inside the brain. Bonnefond: ‘This was a great opportunity to investigate the hippocampus, since it’s difficult to measure deep brain regions with classical electrophysiological techniques, that measure from outside the skull.’

The patients did not have to remember any specific information. ‘You’re consolidating memories every night, so we investigated the process in general. The next step would be to link these clustered oscillations to specific memories.’

Publication:
‘Hierarchical nesting of slow oscillations, spindles and ripples in the human hippocampus during sleep’
Nature Neuroscience
DOI 10.1038/nn.4119

 Contact  Radboud University Comeniuslaan 4 6525 HP Nijmegen The Netherlands +31 24 361 61 61


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