07:37am Wednesday 20 September 2017

Efforts to address complications of childhood cancer treatment

However, many of them pay a high price. The harsh treatment can lead to hormone imbalances that affect sexual and physical development. Others are affected by infertility, cardiovascular or kidney problems or reduced cognitive function.

By learning more about these late effects of treatment, the health service can, on the one hand, improve and reduce the intensity of the treatment, and, on the other hand, find appropriate ways to care for those suffering from side-effects of the treatment in adolescence and adulthood.

The cancer care services in Lund set up a late effects clinic for children affected by cancer as early as 1987. Twenty years later, in 2007, Lund organised the first European conference on late complications of childhood cancer.

This formed the start of the EU project, PanCareSurFup (PanCare Childhood and Adolescent Cancer Survivor Care and Follow-up Studies), which will map the effects of cancer treatment. The project will run for five years and involve 11 EU countries. Its task is to draw up guidelines for best clinical practice in order to cure to the greatest extent possible without causing harm.

Text: Per Längby


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