04:14pm Tuesday 11 December 2018

Lifestyle Counseling Program May Reduce Risk of Certain Cancers

A 5-year healthy lifestyle counseling program for adult men was linked with a reduced risk of developing cancers related to overweight, diet, and smoking over 25 years. As reported in the Journal of Internal Medicine, the intervention did not reduce the overall cancer risk in the very long term.

The study is a 43-year follow-up of the Oslo diet and antismoking study, which recruited men at high risk for cardiovascular disease in 1972–73. Previous research revealed that the counselling intervention had a clear benefit for reducing cardiovascular disease risk in these men. So far, evidence for effects of lifestyle interventions on cancer have been limited, but this Norwegian study showed that advice for a heart-friendly lifestyle also could prevent some cancers in the long term.

“This study showed that changes to a healthier diet and stopping smoking in adult life will reduce risk of some lifestyle-related cancer forms, which are on the rise in the population”, said senior author Dr. Paula Berstad, of the Cancer Registry of Norway.

Additional Information

Link to Study:  https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/joim.12765

About Journal

Journal of Internal Medicine (JIM), with its International Advisory Board, has developed into a highly successful journal since it was launched in its revised form in 1989. With an Impact Factor of 7.980, Journal of Internal Medicine now ranks 10th among the 154 journals in the General & Internal Medicine category.

  • Established in 1863.
  • Features original clinical articles within the broad field of general and internal medicine and its sub-specialties.
  • A fully international journal publishing articles in English from all over the world.
  • Peer-reviewed and published in both print and online versions.JIM also supports and organizes scientific meetings in the form of symposia within the scope of the journal.

 


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