05:32pm Wednesday 16 August 2017

New sequence of naked mole rat genome aids cancer resistance research

The naked mole rat is an exceptionally long-lived and cancer-resistant rodent native to East Africa. The new study presents a higher-quality assembly of the rodent’s genetic structure to previous sequences of the species genome, enabling the research community to benefit from this key data.

The study, led by international scientists from TGAC, University of Liverpool, Broad Institute, Uppsala University and Harvard Medical School, re-analysed the naked mole rat genome using the improved assembly that revealed further candidate genes of potential relevance to adaptive changes in the context of ageing and cancer.

With a life span of over thirty years, not only is the naked mole rat (Heterocephalus glaber) the longest-lived rodent, but it is also extremely resistant to neoplasia (tumours), and therefore is an ideal model for research on longevity, cancer and disease resistance.

Co-author from the University of Liverpool’s Institute of Integrative Biology, Dr Joao Pedro De Magalhaes, said: “The new study provides a fundamental resource for research on the naked mole rat and its many evolutionary adaptations, including longevity and resistance to diseases, as well as other traits (metabolic regulation, development, pain, and behaviour). We predict that studying a species so long-lived (particularly given its small body size) and with such an astonishing resistance to neoplasia, will help elucidate mechanisms and genes conferring longevity and cancer resistance in mammals that may have human applications.”

To help facilitate and encourage further research into this fascinating species, the team of scientists have developed a freely-available online portal, the Naked Mole-Rat Genome Resource, featuring the new genome sequence and the data results of their analysis.

Federica Di Palma, co-author and Director of Science at TGAC, said: “A high-quality, annotated naked mole rat genome is essential for the research community to develop the sophisticated molecular biology tools necessary to study these amazing animals. By creating a genome resource for the naked mole rat with an advanced genome assembly, we aim to facilitate studies into this fascinating animal and help establish the naked mole rat as the first long-lived model for bioscience research underpinning health.”

The paper, titled: “The Naked Mole Rat Genome Resource: facilitating analyses of cancer and longevity-related adaptations” is published in Bioinformatics, Oxford Journals.

TGAC is strategically funded by BBSRC and operates a National Capability to promote the application of genomics and bioinformatics to advance bioscience research and innovation.

ENDS

 

About TGAC

The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC) is a world-class research institute focusing on the development of genomics and computational biology. TGAC is based within the Norwich Research Park and receives strategic funding from the Biotechnology and Biological Science Research Council (BBSRC) – £7.4M in 2013/14 – as well as support from other research funders. TGAC is one of eight institutes that receive strategic funding from BBSRC. TGAC operates a National Capability to promote the application of genomics and bioinformatics to advance bioscience research and innovation.

 

TGAC offers state of the art DNA sequencing facility, unique by its operation of multiple complementary technologies for data generation. The Institute is a UK hub for innovative Bioinformatics through research, analysis and interpretation of multiple, complex data sets. It hosts one of the largest computing hardware facilities dedicated to life science research in Europe. It is also actively involved in developing novel platforms to provide access to computational tools and processing capacity for multiple academic and industrial users and promoting applications of computational Bioscience. Additionally, the Institute offers a Training programme through courses and workshops, and an Outreach programme targeting schools, teachers and the general public through dialogue and science communication activities. www.tgac.ac.uk

External contact

Hayley London, Marketing & Communications Officer, The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC)


Tel: +44 (0)1603 450107

 

Contact

BBSRC Media Office


Tel: +44 (0)1793 414694


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