COPD Progression

Protein that inhibits and reduces the effects of chemotherapy identified

Researchers at Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet and their colleagues from Science for Life Laboratories (SciLifeLab) and Heidelberg University have identified a protein that determines the efficacy of cytarabin – the most important drug for treating acute myeloid leukaemia. Their results are published in the scientific journal Nature Medicine.

COPD Progression

Tracking down therapy-resistant leukaemia cells

Neuherberg – Dr. Irmela Jeremias from Helmholtz Zentrum München and her colleagues have succeeded in finding a small population of inactive leukaemia cells that is responsible for relapse of the disease. Now the way is paved for research into new therapies that prevent disease relapse by eliminating the remaining, so-called dormant leukaemia cells. The research results have now been published in the Cancer Cell journal.

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New treatment approach for leukemia renders cancer genes powerless

Cancer researcher from Mainz develops targeted epigenetic approach for the treatment of aggressive forms of leukemia

Mainz- In leukemia cells it is often the case that genes are reactivated that, in physiological terms, mediate the self-renewal of blood stem cells. In a common subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, this abnormal activation of such self-renewing genes is apparently caused by structural modifications of the DNA packaging. In turn, these modifications are caused by two specific proteins of the so-called chromatin regulator group, on which leukemia cells are dependent. These discoveries were made by oncologist Dr. Michael Kühn from the Department of Internal Medicine III, which is a part of the University Center for Tumor Diseases (UCT) at the Mainz University Medical Center, in a collaborative effort with researchers from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and Harvard University in Boston. The researchers were able to demonstrate that a targeted drug-based inactivation of the two chromatin regulators will interrupt the self-renewing program, thereby causing leukemia cells to revert to normal blood cells. The results have been published in the October issue of Cancer Discovery.

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Precision medicine breakthrough for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

Scientists at the University of Glasgow have made a second significant breakthrough in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia – using precision medicine to kill more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) stem cells. The results are published today in the high impact journal Cancer Discovery.

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Venetoclax Safe, Shows Promise in Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

PHILADELPHIA — Patients whose acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) had relapsed or was resistant to chemotherapy and those who were deemed unable to tolerate chemotherapy experienced responses to the selective BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax (Venclexta), with complete remissions in some, according to phase II clinical trial data published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

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Hybrid treatment hunts down and kills leukemia cells

SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — Researchers at UC Davis and Ionis Pharmaceuticals have developed a hybrid treatment that harnesses a monoclonal antibody to deliver antisense DNA to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells and that may lead to less toxic treatments for the disease.

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Disturbances in blood cell gene transcription may lead to leukemia

Researchers have succeeded in shedding light on the pathogenesis of DNA breakpoints that are associated with leukemia. A mechanism discovered in a recent study can explain up to 90% of DNA damages present in the most common type of leukemia in children. The study was carried out by the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Tampere, and the findings were published in eLife.

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Aggressiveness of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Elucidated

Scientists at the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research (FMI) and the University of Basel have discovered why acute leukemias with the same genetic abnormality vary in their aggressiveness based on their cellular origin. They found that the cancer inducing alteration is particularly devastating if it occurs in early hematopoietic stem cells expressing certain genes involved in cell migration and tissue invasion. These findings should now make it possible to classify patients into more clearly defined groups, to adapt treatment, and hopefully also to develop personalized therapeutic strategies for the future.