06:09am Tuesday 17 October 2017

New prostate cancer drugs may not be targeting root cause of disease, York scientists warn

Scientists at the University of York have discovered that a process called ‘methylation’, previously thought to drive the development of cancer, occurs in cells that are already cancerous. The findings mean therapies aimed at reversing this process might not be effective against cancer stem cells, allowing the cancer to return.

The work, carried out by Dr Davide Pellacani, a member of Professor Norman Maitland’s team at the YCR Cancer Research Unit at the University’s Department of Biology, and funded by Yorkshire Cancer Research and the Grand Masonic Charity, reveals a major difference between the cells normally treated in cancer and the underlying ‘stem’ cells.

Dr Pellacani said: “To develop cancer, certain proteins found in healthy cells need to be switched off. Sometimes this is caused by methylation – a process where DNA is changed to block instructions for making a specific protein.

Differentiated prostate cancer cells “There are obvious differences in the methylation of genes in prostate cancer cells and non-cancer cells. This previously suggested that the process could be driving the progression of cancer, and that this could be reversed by using specific drugs, but our research has suggested that this may not be the case.”

Prostate cancer is made up of two types of cell; rare basal cells, including stem cells, from which the tumour is formed, and luminal cells, which form the tumour mass.

The team found that a change from basal to luminal cells – a process called differentiation – is strongly linked to the methylation difference, suggesting that the methylation in prostate cancer cells is not the primary driving force for the cancer.

Dr Pellacani continued: “There are clear implications for the effectiveness of new drugs currently being developed to change the methylation pattern in cancers. At the moment we only treat a proportion of the cells. By breaking the cancer down into its component cell types, we get insights into why cancers come back after treatment.  Only by treating all the cells in a cancer will we approach long term treatment or even cure.”

Professor Maitland and his team at the YCR Cancer Research Unit achieved international recognition in 2005 when they were the first to identify prostate cancer stem cells, which are believed to be the ‘root cause’ of prostate cancer. The team, now supported by a £2.15m award from Yorkshire Cancer Research, has since explored the exact molecular properties that allow these cells to spread, survive and resist aggressive treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy.

 

Notes to editors:

  • Harrogate-based Yorkshire Cancer Research is the UK’s largest regional medical research charity (registered charity no. 516898). It exists to help the people of Yorkshire avoid, survive and cope with cancer by funding world-class research into its causes, diagnosis and treatment.
  • Yorkshire Cancer Research works in partnership with over 200 scientists and clinicians to develop expertise and talent within Yorkshire.
  • Current statistics that show 267 people die every week from cancer in Yorkshire and that survival rates are below the national average. By funding research in Yorkshire, we are ensuring that people with cancer who live in the region have access to groundbreaking treatments, while also contributing to the global fight against the disease.
  • For further information, please visit www.yorkshirecancerresearch.org.uk or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.
  • For more information about the Department of Biology at the University of York, please visit: www.york.ac.uk/biology

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