IBS affects women's quality of life more than men's

Double work and a high embarrassment factor can lead to the quality of life being affected more among women than men by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a very common gastrointestinal disease. Even with the same level of physical pain and other symptoms, women’s perceived quality of life is worse than the mens, according to new research.

Identification of A Novel Protein That Protects against Bowel Inflammation

A group of researchers, led by Prof. MATOZAKI Takashi and Associate Prof. MURATA Yoji at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine Division of Molecular and Cellular Signaling, were the first to demonstrate the role of stomach cancer–associated protein tyrosine phosphatase (SAP)-1 in the pathogenesis and prevention of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and other inflammatory bowel disorders.

Developing a Targeted Hydrogel to Treat Inflammatory Bowel Disease

In the United States, more than 1 million people suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and its incidence around the world continues to rise. But treatment delivery options for patients remain limited: many people must rely on daily enemas, which can be uncomfortable, impractical and lead to side effects when medicine is absorbed by healthy tissue. Investigators from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and collaborators from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and MIT set out to find a better way to deliver medicine using a gel-like material created in the lab.

Younger immigrants at higher risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)

OTTAWA – The younger a person is when they immigrate to Canada, the higher their risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and its major subtypes Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, according to a study by researchers at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) and the University of Ottawa.

Researchers Discover Molecular Trigger of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Image of a zebrafish in which the entire intestine is highlighted in red and the expression of the TNF molecule is highlighted in green. Duke researchers have discovered that a gene called uhrf1 acts like a kind of molecular handbrake on TNF, keeping it from setting off the series of pro-inflammatory and immune signals that drive inflammatory bowel diseases. Photo by Lindsay Marjoram

Viruses may play unexpected role in inflammatory bowel diseases

By Michael C. Purdy – Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with a decrease in the diversity of bacteria in the gut, but a new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has linked the same illnesses to an increase in the diversity of viruses.

New Approach to Preventing Fibrosing Strictures in IBD

Bethesda, MD — A natural protein made by immune cells may limit fibrosis and scarring in colitis, according to research1 published in the inaugural issue of Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the new basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association.