03:50pm Friday 15 December 2017

Study links lower life satisfaction to sleep problems during midlife

Respondents with higher life satisfaction reported shorter sleep onset latency (SOL). Sleep onset delay among those with low life satisfaction could be the result of worry and anxiety, as reported elsewhere. These findings support the idea that life satisfaction is interlinked with many measures of sleep and sleep quality, suggesting that improving one of these variables might result in improving the other.

“These findings support the idea that life satisfaction is interlinked with many measures of sleep and sleep quality, suggesting that improving one of these variables might result in improvement in the other,” said lead author Hayley O’Hara, recent graduate of Ohio Northern University.

The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and will be presented Monday, June 8, in Seattle, Washington, at SLEEP 2015, the 29th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC.

The study group comprised 3,950 adults. Fifty-five percent were female and ranged in age from 17 to 74. A 6-item life satisfaction survey was used to code participants as having low, medium, and high levels of satisfaction, and a subjective measure of minutes it takes to fall asleep was used to measure SOL.

The research was performed under the supervision of Dr. Megan Clegg-Kraynok at Ohio Northern University. The data was collected as part of the Midlife in the United States II (MIDUS II), a national study funded by the National Institute on Aging.

Abstract Title: The Effect of Life Satisfaction on Sleep Onset Latency During Midlife
Abstract ID: 0089
Presentation Date: Monday, June 8, 2015
Presentation Type: Poster 84
Presentation Time: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

The SLEEP 2015 abstract supplement is available at http://journalsleep.org/ViewAbstractSupplement.aspx

For a copy of the abstract or to arrange an interview with the study author or an AASM spokesperson, please contact AASM Communications Coordinator Lynn Celmer at 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, or lcelmer@aasmnet.org.

About SLEEP 2015
More than 5,000 sleep medicine physicians and sleep scientists will gather at SLEEP 2015, the 29th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS), which will be held June 6-10 at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. The scientific program will include about 1,200 research abstract presentations. The APSS is a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society (www.sleepmeeting.org). 

About the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Established in 1975, the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) improves sleep health and promotes high quality patient centered care through advocacy, education, strategic research, and practice standards. With nearly 10,000 members, the AASM is the largest professional membership society for physicians, scientists and other health care providers dedicated to sleep medicine (www.aasmnet.org).

CONTACT: Lynn Celmer, 630-737-9700, ext. 9364, lcelmer@aasmnet.org


Share on:
or:

Health news