08:27am Thursday 14 December 2017

Mother's obesity may lead to infertility in the next generation

Hormones involved in energy balance and metabolism, such as ghrelin, have been shown to regulate reproductive function in animals and humans. However ghrelin’s role in reproductive tract development remains unclear. The current study examined the effect of ghrelin deficiency on the developmental programming of female fertility.

“While our study involved mice, we believe our findings have significant implications for women,” said Hugh Taylor, MD, of the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. and lead author of the study. “Our results suggest that low ghrelin levels could program the development of the uterus in the female children of obese women. These women may then be less fertile as adults.”

In this study, researchers observed that female mice born of mice with ghrelin deficiency had diminished fertility and produced smaller litters than mice born of mice with normal ghrelin levels. Mice exposed to ghrelin deficiency in-utero demonstrated alterations in uterine gene expression which lead to impaired embryo implantation and consequently low fertility.

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Other researchers working on the study include: J. Ryan Martin, Sarah Lieber, James McGrath, Marya Shanabrough and Tamas Horvath of the Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn.

The article, “Maternal Ghrelin Deficiency Compromises Reproduction in Female Progeny through Altered Uterine Developmental Programming,” appears in the April 2011 issue of Endocrinology.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology. Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 14,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at www.endo-society.org.

Contact: Aaron Lohr
alohr@endo-society.org
240-482-1380
The Endocrine Society


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