04:32pm Wednesday 20 September 2017

Uni death expert warns of crisis as baby-boomers reach old age

Dr Kate Woodthorpe, from the University’s Centre for Death & Society, says that by 2030 there will be an extra 100,000 people dying a year, a 17 per cent rise in current figures.

She said: “We are not prepared for it and it is becoming increasingly apparent that many people have not given enough thought to the cost of support towards the end of life.

“If these people don’t have savings or assets to sell to pay for their care then it’s the State that has to pay for it. This is before funeral costs and burial/cremation fees – which we know are rising across the country – have been factored in. If someone has no assets these costs have to be picked up by the local authority or NHS.”

According to the Office for National Statistics around 35 per cent of people in Britain currently have no savings.

“We are approaching a time when the post-war baby-boomers are coming to the end of their lives and support from the State is being scaled back. The cost of dying, funerals and dispersement is a potential minefield,” said Dr Woodthorpe.

“People are living longer and often need support for longer. All this is happening at a time when the death rate will start to rise.

“What happens to people who die and have no assets?”


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