11:27am Thursday 23 November 2017

Growing population of older prisoners need more health and social care services

The findings, published by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Journals Library in Health Services and Delivery Research  this week (8 August) showed 44% of prisons do not have a policy on the care and management of older prisoners and there was a lack of integration between health and social care services.

Planning for an older prisoner’s release from jail was also frequently non-existent leading to their health and social care needs not being met once they were out in the community – unless they lived in probation-approved premises immediately on release.

Professor Jenny Shaw, from the Offender Health Research Network based at the Institute of Brain Behaviour and Mental Health at The University of Manchester, said specialised assessments were required for older patients because they have more complex health and social care needs than their younger counterparts and those of a similar age living in the community.

Earlier studies have shown approximately 85% of older prisoners having had one or more major illness with the most frequently reported health conditions being cardiovascular diseases, arthritis, back problems, respiratory diseases and depression. They are also at greater risk of becoming isolated and are less likely to have social support, putting them at a greater risk of developing mental health difficulties.

The Manchester research, led by Professor Shaw, looked at serving male prisoners over age 60 at all prisons in England and Wales.

It found some positive improvements including that the number of prisons appointing a member of staff to act as an Older Prisoner Lead had increased in recent years. But these staff did not all appear to be fully active in their roles in tailoring and improving services for older prisoners.

The study also found the Department of Health’s recommendation to provide older prisoners with a specific health and social care assessment when they arrived at prison was largely unmet. 

Professor Shaw said: “There seems to be ambiguity regarding the responsibility for older prisoners’ social care. We also found that the geographical organisation of social services can result in the responsible social service being located a considerable distance from where prisoners are being held. In such instances, local social services do not co-ordinate their care.”

“Older prisoners have on average almost three unmet health and social care needs on entry to prison and the most frequent unmet need was in relation to knowing where to get information about their care. We are now calling for a series of improvements to be made.”

Suggested improvements include housing older prisoners near to where they will live when they are released to improve the co-ordination of their care and a thorough health and social care entry assessment for all older prisoners which is then reviewed throughout their sentence. Guidelines also set out how to systematically address these health needs during a prisoner’s sentence and will now be piloted at a number of prisons in England.

The full report can be viewed here: http://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/hsdr/volume-1/issue-5.

-ENDS

Notes for editors

 

For further information or to request an interview with Professor Jenny Shaw, please contact: Alison Barbuti | Media Relations Officer |The University of Manchester | Tel. +44 (0)161 275 8383 | Mobile 07887 561 318 |Email: alison.barbuti@manchester.ac.uk

The report, entitled: Health and social care services for older male adults in prison: the identification of current service provision and piloting of an assessment and care planning model” is published by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) this week. To view the report, please click here: http://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/hsdr/volume-1/issue-5.
Senior J, Forsyth K, Walsh E, O’Hara K, Stevenson C, Hayes A, et al.Health and social care services for older male adults in prison: the identification of current service provision and piloting of an assessment and care planning model. Health Serv Deliv Res 2013;1(5)

The University of Manchester

The University of Manchester, a member of the Russell Group, is one of the largest and most popular universities in the UK. It has 20 academic schools and hundreds of specialist research groups undertaking pioneering multi-disciplinary teaching and research of worldwide significance. According to the results of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, The University of Manchester is one of the country’s major research institutions, rated third in the UK in terms of ‘research power’. The University has an annual income of £807 million and is ranked 40th in the world and fifth in the UK for the quality of its teaching and impact of its research.

The National Institute of Health Research
1. The National Institute of Health Research Health Services and Delivery Research (NIHR HS&DR) Programme was established to fund a broad range of research. It builds on the strengths and contributions of two NIHR research programmes: the Health Services Research (HSR) programme and the Service Delivery and Organisation (SDO) programme, which merged in January 2012. The programme aims to produce rigorous and relevant evidence on the quality, access and organisation of health services, including costs and outcomes. The programme will enhance the strategic focus on research that matters to the NHS. The HS&DR Programme is funded by the NIHR with specific contributions from the CSO in Scotland, NISCHR in Wales and the HSC R&D Division, Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland.www.netscc.ac.uk/hsdr/
2. The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (www.nihr.ac.uk).
3. The NIHR Journals Library comprises a suite of five open access peer-reviewed journals reporting results from a range of health research areas. Reports published in the NIHR Journals Library provide a full account of the research project, including methods and a full description of the results.The full reports complement shorter articles submitted for publication in other peer-review journals which the NIHR actively encourages researchers to do as part of their dissemination strategy.www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.ukThis article/paper/report presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.


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