Health Canal

Urinary tract infections in childhood can affect blood pressure

In a unique Gothenburg study, women with renal damage caused by urinary tract infections in childhood have been followed 35 years after their first urinary tract infection. A new thesis from Sahlgrenska Academy shows that these women have higher blood pressure and reduced renal function in adulthood.

Health Canal

Bacterium’s coiled anchor causes urinary tract infections

UCL and Birkbeck-led research reveals the flexible, coiled structure used by bacteria to anchor onto the lining of the urinary tract, which allows them to thrive and cause infections. Understanding this structure in atomic detail will help the development of new drugs to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs), say the scientists behind the study.

Health Canal

A person’s diet, acidity of urine may affect susceptibility to UTIs

By Julia Evangelou Strait – The acidity of urine — as well as the presence of small molecules related to diet — may influence how well bacteria can grow in the urinary tract, a new study shows. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, may have implications for treating urinary tract infections, which are among the most common bacterial infections worldwide.

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Breakthrough NIH study will have major implications for treating pediatric UTIs

New findings by the Children’s Hospital of Michigan – Detroit Medical Center (DMC) Chief of Pediatric Nephrology and Wayne State University School of Medicine Pediatrics Professor Dr. Tej K. Mattoo and a national team of researchers – was published this week in the authoritative New England Journal of Medicine – are likely to change the way pediatricians manage troublesome urinary tract infections in millions of American children. They are also likely to change the current guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics on renal imaging after first urinary tract infection in young children.

Health Canal

A Way to End Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections? Study Gives Hope

(SALT LAKE CITY)—Millions of people worldwide – mostly women – suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) that seriously degrade their health and quality of life. Antibiotics treat individual infections, but preventing recurrent ones largely has been unattainable because of the way bacteria lodge in the inner layers of the bladder and quietly hide from drugs that can kill them.