08:58pm Wednesday 19 September 2018

Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

In a recent LUTS study, men with central (or abdominal) obesity were at increased risk of experiencing lower urinary tract symptoms, and increased waist-to-hip ratio was associated with worsened straining and weak stream.

The study included 2,917 men from the Fangchenggang Area Male Healthy and Examination Survey in China.

The authors noted that lower urinary tract symptoms are highly prevalent in both aging men and women, and the relationship with obesity is controversial.

Additional Information

Link to Study: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/luts.12231

About Journal

LUTS is designed for the timely communication of peer-reviewed studies which provides new clinical and basic science information to physicians and researchers in the field of neurourology, urodynamics and urogynecology. Contributions are reviewed and selected by a group of distinguished referees from around the world, some of whom constitute the journal’s Editorial Board. The journal covers both basic and clinical research on lower urinary tract dysfunctions (LUTD), such as overactive bladder (OAB), detrusor underactivity, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), bladder outlet obstruction (BOO), urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse (POP), painful bladder syndrome (PBS), as well as on other relevant conditions.  Case reports are published only if new findings are provided.
LUTS is an official journal of the Japanese Continence Society, the Korean Continence Society, and the Taiwanese Continence Society. Submission of papers from all countries are welcome. LUTS has been accepted into Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) with a 2011 Impact Factor.

About Wiley 

Wiley, a global research and learning company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 210 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company’s website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

 

 


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