05:51pm Thursday 17 August 2017

Staying power

Exercise combined with social or family connections are two other factors that increase the chances of healthier ageing. Photo: ©istockphoto.com/mammamaart
Exercise combined with social or family connections are two other factors that increase the chances of healthier ageing. Photo: ©istockphoto.com/mammamaart

Yet advances in health care and living standards mean that more of us are likely to live longer than our ancestors. With this in mind, having trouble walking, not being able to drive or forgetting a loved one’s name are possible future realities for many of us. But can we prevent the seemingly inevitable?

Professor Kaarin Anstey, director of the Ageing Research Unit at ANU, believes academics could provide the answers. She was recently presented with the 2009 Ewald W. Busse Research Award in Paris for her contribution to international research in gerontology, particularly the social and behavioural aspects of ageing.

“There are a lot of negative stereotypes about ageing, physically and socially, and researchers are addressing some of those stereotypes – we need to discover what people can do to age well,” Professor Anstey says.

“Ageing is a global phenomenon, so we need to think about how Australia relates to the rest of the world, in terms of ageing well and what we can learn from other countries.”

Read the full article in the ANU Reporter.  


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