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Best Protein Powder For Buttocks Growth In 2024

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

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Optimum Nutrition 100% Gold Standard Whey Protein

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Whey Protein Powder

  • More than 20 flavors to choose from
  • 24 grams of protein per serving
  • Banned substance tested
  • 5.5 grams (g) of naturally occurring branched-chain amino acids (BCAA)

Optimum Nutrition Performance Whey Isolate Protein Powder

Optimum Nutrition Performance Whey Isolate Protein Powder

  • 30 grams of protein per serving
  • Only one gram of sugar per serving
  • Fast-digesting protein powder

Naked Whey Grass-Fed Whey Protein Powder

Naked WHEY Grass-Fed Whey Protein Powder 5LB

  • 25 grams of protein per serving
  • Whey protein is the only ingredient
  • Sourced from grass-fed cows raised on small California dairy farms
  • Good source of omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA

15% Off Coupon: HEALTHCANAL

If booty gains are your goal, meeting your estimated protein needs is critical to the process. Muscle growth occurs when damaged muscle undergoes repair, which requires protein synthesis. Your body uses the amino acids in the protein you eat to facilitate muscle protein synthesis and increase your muscle mass. High-quality protein can be found in various food sources, but it’s not uncommon to fall short of meeting your daily needs through whole foods alone.

Protein powders have become a popular choice of dietary protein for those seeking to build lean and strong muscles. Protein powder is a convenient and effective way to boost your protein intake without skewing your other macronutrients. Of course, following a high-protein diet isn’t the end-all, be-all for bigger glutes, but it’s an essential factor. This article will review five of the market’s best protein powders for buttocks growth.

Best Protein Powder For Glute Growth (February. 2024)

Best Protein Powder For Buttocks Growth In 2024

Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard 100% Whey Protein Powder

Optimum Nutrition’s Gold Standard 100% Whey Protein Powder is available in a wide variety of flavors and provides consumers with 24 grams of whey protein per serving. So easy to mix, you can enjoy it prepared in milk or water.

  • More than 20 flavors to choose from
  • 24 grams of protein per serving
  • Banned substance tested
  • Contains all nine essential amino acids
  • Limited vitamins and minerals

The protein in Optimum Nutrition’s Gold Standard 100% Whey Protein Powder is sourced primarily from whey protein isolate, meaning excess carbohydrates and fats have been removed using advanced filtering technologies. This gluten-free protein powder has also been instantized for easy mixing in your favorite protein shake. Available in 20 different flavors, including many naturally flavored options, there is a taste for everyone. 

The product’s overall rating on the company’s website is 4.8/5 stars. The reviews seem to be overwhelmingly positive. Optimum Nutrition also offers many different protein powders, so you are sure to find one that meets your needs while helping you accomplish your fitness goals.

Optimum Nutrition Performance Whey Isolate Protein Powder

Optimum Nutrition’s Performance Whey Isolate Protein Powder provides 30 grams of protein per serving sourced from 100% whey protein powder and contains minuscule amounts of carbohydrates and fat.

  • 30 grams of protein per serving
  • Only one gram of sugar per serving
  • Fast-digesting protein powder
  • Contains all nine essential amino acids
  • Limited flavors
  • Contains the artificial sweetener, Sucralose

In Optimum Nutrition’s Performance Whey Isolate Protein Powder, the whey protein undergoes a series of filtration processes to isolate excess fat, cholesterol, and sugar. As a result, you can boost your protein intake without altering your carbohydrate and fat intake, and the resulting product can be digested quickly.

It is gluten-free and banned substance tested. Each serving contains 30 grams of protein, including 6.5 grams of BCAAs. It is suggested that consumers mix one scoop of protein powder with 6-8 ounces of cold water. With over 2,000 reviews, it is highly esteemed, with an average of 4.7 stars out of five. However, Optimum Nutrition’s Whey formula contains the controversial ingredient, Sucralose. Sucralose may alter the gut microbiome favoring the growth of bad bacteria and may increase blood sugar when combined with sources of carbohydrates. It is called a controversial ingredient because it is on the “generally recognized as safe” list published by the Food and Drug Administration. Yet research shows that the substance may be a health hazard for some people.

Naked Whey Grass-Fed Whey Protein Powder

Naked Whey Grass-Fed Whey Protein Powder

15% Off Coupon: HEALTHCANAL

See Naked Nutrition Reviews

Naked Whey’s Grass-Fed Protein Powder is sourced from grass-fed cows living on small California dairy farms. This protein powder efficiently provides 25 grams of complete protein per serving with only one ingredient.

  • 25 grams of protein per serving
  • Good source of omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) 
  • Contains all the essential amino acids
  • Not ideal for those with lactose sensitivity

Those looking for a protein powder made with natural ingredients might be intrigued by the Grass-Fed Protein Powder from Natural Whey. This protein powder is made with a single ingredient and is free of additives and artificial sweeteners like acesulfame potassium. The protein is sourced from cows living on small dairy farms in California. The cows are grass-fed year-round and raised without growth hormones. 

Natural Whey takes pride in how they raise their cows, not only for your health benefits but also for the reduced impact on the environment. Their grass-fed formula is gluten-free, soy-free, and GMO-free. It is, however, high in CLA, which can help boost your immune system, support lean muscle mass, and improve heart health. With over 1500 reviews on their website, the feedback seems to be overwhelmingly positive.

Orgain Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder

Orgain Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder is a valuable addition to the vegan protein powder market. It is certified USDA organic and supports muscle mass by providing the essential amino acids necessary in every serving. 

  • 21 grams of protein per serving
  • Eight flavors
  • Vegan-friendly
  • Subscribe and save purchase option
  • Requires two scoops per serving
  • The largest product size available to purchase is only 2 pounds

Orgain’s Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder contains 21 grams of vegan-friendly protein and only 150 calories per serving. It contains a complete amino acid profile with no added sugars or artificial sweeteners. With eight flavors to choose from, you have the option to add some variety to your weekly protein intake by alternating flavors. 

This protein powder provides high-quality protein and is made without soy, dairy, or lactose ingredients. It is gluten-free and kosher, and it is certified organic by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Each serving provides nine essential amino acids and a list of BCAAs. Furthermore, it is also an excellent low-calorie protein powder choice.

Vega Sport Premium Protein Powder

Vega Sport Premium Protein Powder

20% Off Coupon: HC20

See My Vega Reviews

Vega Sport Premium Protein Powder is a vegan protein powder that contains all nine essential amino acids to support lean and strong muscles. Each serving provides 30 grams of protein as well as beneficial probiotics.

  • 30 grams of protein per serving
  • 5 grams of BCAAs
  • Contain probiotics
  • Vegan-friendly source of complete protein
  • Some flavors contain caffeine
  • Higher cost per serving in comparison with others on this list

Vega’s Sports Premium Protein Powder is a vegan-friendly, gluten-free protein powder that can be mixed in a protein shake or smoothie. It is available in five different flavors, two of which contain caffeine if you’re looking for a little extra boost of energy. Each flavor also contains tart cherry and probiotics that are said to help with muscle recovery. 

This plant-based, vegan protein supplementation helps build muscle with 30 grams of protein per serving. There are over 1100 reviews for the Sports Premium Protein Powder on Vega’s website, and the feedback seems to be positive overall. The protein powder received 4.6 stars out of five.

Does Protein Grow Your Butt?

There is no way to direct nutrition to one specific area in the body, but adequate protein intake is essential for muscle growth. When combined with exercise, increased protein intake can help develop muscles by repairing the broken-down tissue, including your buttocks. Dietary protein is critical for building and maintaining muscle, so if you’re looking for booty growth, you’ll want to ensure adequate protein is part of your healthy diet. 

Additionally, it’s important to be consistent with your workouts. A high-protein diet encourages muscle repair and lean muscle mass development, but your movement determines your butt shape and also develops your cardiovascular system. Butt growth results from a careful balance of physical activity and adequate nutrition. 

Why Should You Take Protein Powder?

According to the National Institutes of Health,[1] the Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein is 0.8 grams per kilogram of body weight. However, that number is a generalized recommendation for the average healthy person. Nutrition needs are very individualized. Your macronutrient recommendations can change based on physical activity, chronic health conditions, and body composition. 

If you increase your exercise to build bigger glutes, you will also need to increase your protein intake to compensate for the muscle breakdown that occurs during your workout. Most people eat enough protein to prevent deficiency, but meeting the bare minimum may not be enough to reach your muscle-building goals or to make your butt bigger. It can be challenging to consume protein through whole foods alone. Enter protein powders. 

While protein powders can help promote muscle growth, many also provide essential vitamins in addition to their high-protein content. Therefore, your muscle cells and overall wellness stand to benefit from the nutritional content of your protein shake. However, if you have any medical concerns or chronic conditions, it is extremely important to discuss any major dietary changes with your doctor or registered dietitian. 

Best Protein For Glute Growth – Buyer’s Guide

While it’s always best to prioritize whole foods in your diet, meeting your protein needs on foods alone can be challenging. Even if you include high-protein foods at every meal, your increased needs from hitting the gym may require the ease and convenience of added protein through protein powders. 

An adequate protein intake is key if a big butt or large gluteal muscles are at the top of your wishlist. Whether your goal is to maintain current muscle or focus on muscle building, protein powders can be instrumental in your balanced diet. To choose the protein shake that is right for you, you may consider its ingredients, digestibility, and nutritional content. The best protein powder for booty gains doesn’t have to be costly, but investing in a high-quality protein powder can be an investment in your overall health.  

The five protein powders included in this article each offer their benefits, but they are not the only quality options available to you. Depending on your needs, you may look for organic protein powder, protein powders with only natural ingredients, or whey protein isolate powders. In addition, many protein powders are gluten-free, and several provide essential vitamins for your muscle cells and beyond.       

Final Thought

If you need to boost your protein intake to help promote gluteal growth, you might consider trying a convenient protein shake made with one of the best protein powders on the market today. While there are many protein powders to choose from, it’s important to do your research and find the product that fits your specific needs. There are no protein powders that magically give you a bigger butt or change your butt shape, but adequate protein intake is essential for muscle building. So, keep up the great work at the gym, and don’t forget to refuel with one of the many protein powders available to choose from.

Remember, nutrition needs are very individualized. So, if you’re considering a new protein powder for glutes in your diet, it’s important to talk with your doctor or registered dietitian nutritionist before adding any new protein supplements to your diet.

Frequently Asked Questions

Does protein powder make your bum bigger?

While there is no way to direct your nutritional intake to one specific area in the body, protein is essential for muscle growth. Adequate protein intake, paired with proper exercise, can help you achieve a bigger butt.

What protein powder is best for growing a bum?

The best protein powder for gluteals is the one you will consume consistently. Building lean muscles depends on regular exercise and adequate nutritional intake. Drinking a protein shake made with protein powders can help you meet those goals.

What can I drink to make my bum bigger?

There are many protein powders to choose from in the market today. Choosing a protein powder that fits your needs and drinking protein shakes after your workouts can help promote muscle gain in your glutes and other muscles.


+ 1 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Nih.gov. (2022). Office of Dietary Supplements – Nutrient Recommendations: Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI). [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/HealthInformation/Dietary_Reference_Intakes.aspx
Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist with a background in fitness and athletics. She has worked as a dietitian in the clinical setting for the past seven years, helping a wide variety of patients navigate their health through nutrition. She finds joy in sharing her passions through her freelance writing career with the hopes of helping people embrace their health and live their lives to the fullest.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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