5 Best Selenium Supplements To Buy 2024: Top Brand Reviews

Lindsey Desoto

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Melissa Mitri, MS, RD

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Peak Performance Raw Whole Food Selenium

Peak Performance Raw Whole Food Selenium

  • Includes an organic fruit and vegetable blend
  • 30-day money-back guarantee
  • Third-party tested

Life Extension Super Selenium Complex

Life Extension Super Selenium Complex

  • Added vitamin E
  • Made in the USA
  • Third-party tested

Pure Encapsulations Selenium (Selenomethionine)

Pure Encapsulations Selenium (Selenomethionine)

  • Dietitians on staff
  • Personalized recommendations available
  • Free of major allergens

Selenium is an essential mineral that is needed by the body in small amounts for several important processes, including DNA synthesis, proper functioning of the thyroid gland, hormone metabolism, and reproduction. It also functions as a powerful antioxidant to help lower oxidative stress and fight inflammation in the body.

Selenium is found in the soil, water, and foods like Brazil nuts, pork, beef, and eggs. Selenium concentrations in plants vary based on the selenium content of the soil they are grown in.

Many people with confirmed selenium deficiencies are advised to take a selenium supplement to prevent or treat low selenium levels.

This article will discuss the health benefits of selenium and the best selenium supplements to buy in 2022.

Best Selenium Supplements To Buy in (March. 2024)

What Is A Selenium Supplement?

Selenium dietary supplements come in liquid form and capsule form. They are generally made with either organic selenium (selenomethionine and selenocysteine) or inorganic selenium (selenate and selenite). 

Healthcare providers often recommend supplements when someone has a selenium deficiency.

Although selenium deficiency[1] is rare in the United States, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and kidney disease undergoing dialysis are at a greater risk for selenium deficiency. Those who follow vegan or vegetarian diets are also at risk.

To meet selenium requirements[2], males and females 14 and older should consume 55 micrograms (mcg) each day from their diet or supplement regimen. Pregnant and lactating individuals need a bit more – 60 and 70 mcg of selenium each day. Children and young teens require less selenium compared to adults. For example, children 9-13 years old need 40 mcg.

5 Best Selenium Supplements On The Market 2024

Peak Performance Raw Whole Food Selenium

Peak Performance Selenium capsules contain 200 milligrams of selenium derived from whole foods in addition to over 25 antioxidant-rich[3], hormone-balancing organic fruits and vegetables.

  • Derived from whole foods
  • Third-party tested
  • 30-day money-back guarantee
  • Free of many allergens
  • Vegan-friendly
  • Pricey

Peak Performance is a company known for creating high-quality, whole-food-derived supplements. This supplement is formulated with organic fruits and vegetables sourced right here in the United States. 

Each vegan capsule contains 200 mcg of selenium as well as 200 milligrams of other beneficial ingredients like organic alfalfa leaf, pomegranate, spirulina, cranberry fruit, and grapefruit.

Spirulina[4], a type of blue-green algae, has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and may also reduce cholesterol. In addition, it has antimicrobial properties and provides immune system support.

Peak Performance Selenium is third-party tested and manufactured in the USA in compliance with the FDA’s current good manufacturing practices (CGMPs).

Peak Performance Selenium does not contain:

  • Gluten
  • Milk
  • Egg
  • Wheat
  • Corn
  • Peanut
  • Soy
  • Shellfish
  • Binders
  • Preservatives
  • GMOs (genetically modified ingredients)

The company is also a proud supporter of Vitamin Angels, a charity that provides vitamins to mothers and children at risk for malnutrition.

Prices start at around $0.77 per capsule or $22.95 for a 30-day supply. If you are unsatisfied with the product, you can return it within 30 days for a full refund.

Life Extension Super Selenium Complex

Life Extension Super Selenium Complex includes three different forms of selenium in addition to vitamin E to promote overall health and wellness.

  • Made in the USA
  • Added vitamin E
  • Third-party tested
  • Affordable
  • Not vegan-friendly

Life Extension Super Selenium Complex contains 200 mcg of selenium as well as 20.1 milligrams of the powerful antioxidant[5] vitamin E. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for vitamin E is 15 milligrams[6] per day for individuals over the age of 14.

Some studies[7] suggest that the combination of vitamin E and selenium may be more effective than either nutrient alone.

Each capsule provides three forms of selenium:

  • 50 micrograms of organic L-selenomethionine
  • 50 micrograms of inorganic sodium selenite
  • 100 micrograms of organic L-selenocysteine

Selenium supplements derived from organic selenium[8] have been seen to be more effective in providing their benefits, according to research. The selenium in this product is sourced from India and the USA.

Life Extension Super Selenium Complex is vegetarian-friendly and free of gluten and GMOs. It does contain silica, which some individuals choose to avoid. 

When inhaled in its crystalline form, silica can cause lung damage[9] over time. However, research[10] has not shown a danger from the small levels found in our food and dietary supplements. Most of the potential risks of overexposure to silica are related to exposure in certain work environments, not our diet.

This supplement is manufactured in the United States and tested by a third party for purity and potency.

Prices start at just $0.05 per serving or $1.50 for a 30-day supply.

Pure Encapsulations Selenium (Selenomethionine)

Pure Encapsulations Selenium delivers selenium in a highly bioavailable form. Having a high bioavailability means it is more efficiently absorbed in the body, allowing you to put it to good use.

  • Third-party tested
  • Highly bioavailable
  • Free of artificial ingredients, flavors, and preservatives
  • Free of major allergens
  • Vegan
  • Some customers report a strong smell

Pure Encapsulations is a well-respected brand frequently recommended by healthcare practitioners. Their selenium supplements contain 200 micrograms of selenomethionine in each vegan capsule. 

All products are made in their NSF-Certified, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliant facility, are third-party tested, and free of common allergens.

This certified gluten-free supplement is also free of:

  • Gluten
  • GMOs
  • Eggs
  • Wheat
  • Peanuts
  • Tree nuts
  • Soy
  • Artificial flavors
  • Unnecessary binder, fillers, or preservatives

If you are unsure what supplements you need, the company offers a free quiz to provide you with personalized recommendations based on your responses. Pure Encapsulations also has a team of registered dietitians on staff to answer any additional questions you may have.

Prices start at $0.22 per capsule or $6.60 for a 30-day supply.

Thorne Research Selenomethionine

Thorne Research is known for its high-quality nutritional supplements. The company’s Selenomethionine supplement contains a bioavailable form of selenium, making it an excellent choice. 

  • High-quality selenomethionine
  • Affordable
  • Third-party tested
  • Soy-free and gluten-free
  • Not labeled vegan/vegetarian-friendly

Thorne Research Selenomethionine has 200 micrograms of well-absorbed selenomethionine in each capsule. Like Thorne’s other high-quality supplements, this product is free of GMOs, artificial colors, flavors, soy, and gluten.

The company has an A rating with Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), which is often considered the toughest regulatory agency in the world. Thorne is the first United States nutrition supplement company fully certified by TGA. Their production facility is also NSF-certified.

Lastly, this supplement is very reasonably priced. Prices start at just $0.17 per capsule.

Vital Nutrients Selenium

Vital Nutrients is a well-respected brand known for delivering quality products. Their Selenium dietary supplement is no exception.

  • Vegan
  • Third-party tested
  • Free of major allergens
  • Made in the USA
  • Contains synthetic sodium selenite

Vital Nutrients Selenium is formulated with 50% highly bioavailable selenomethionine and 50% synthetic sodium selenite. According to the National Institutes of Health[11], the body absorbs more than 90% of selenomethionine but unfortunately absorbs only around 50% of selenium from selenite.

Each vegan capsule is free of

  • Dairy
  • Gluten
  • Peanut
  • Tree nut
  • Egg
  • Soy
  • Sugar
  • Fillers
  • Binders
  • Artificial flavors
  • GMOs

All products are thoroughly tested to ensure no allergens are present.

Unlike many of the other selenium supplements we’ve discussed, Vital Nutrients recommends that consumers take 1-2 capsules or up to 400 micrograms of selenium.

According to the Office of Dietary Supplements[1] (ODS), 400 micrograms is the Tolerable Upper Intake Level, or the maximum recommended daily intake unlikely to cause unwanted side effects.

Unless a healthcare provider recommends taking more, consider starting with one 200 microgram dose.

All products sold by Vital Nutrients are manufactured in the United States and tested by a third party for quality. Dietary supplements purchased from Vital Nutrients or an authorized seller are guaranteed for quality until the listed expiration date.

Prices start at $0.20 per capsule or $5.96 for a 30-day supply. A 5% discount is automatically applied if you choose “Subscribe & Save” at checkout.

Selenium Supplement Benefits

Selenium supplements can offer several health benefits, especially to people with a confirmed deficiency. They may also provide benefits to certain populations, such as those with autoimmune thyroid disease[12].

Here are some of the research-based benefits of selenium.

Skin Health

Studies[13] suggest that selenium plays a key role in skin health. In particular, it helps protect the skin against harmful damage from ultraviolet (UV) rays. Researchers also believe that selenium supplementation may be beneficial for improving psoriasis.

Selenium also aids in the production of glutathione peroxidase[14], an enzyme that fights inflammation.

Many individuals with acne have low levels of selenium and glutathione peroxidase. One study[15] in people with acne found that supplementing 400 micrograms of selenium and 20 milligrams of vitamin E daily for twelve weeks led to symptom improvement. Results were more profound in people with low baseline glutathione peroxidase activity.

Supports a Healthy Immune System

Selenium has high antioxidant properties and may help fight off oxidative stress, reducing inflammation in the body and improving immune health.

Studies[16] suggest that selenium supplements may enhance immunity in people with moderate to low levels.

Research[17] also shows that people with HIV or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are more likely to have low selenium levels, which is associated with disease progression and mortality. It is also believed that selenium supplements may slow disease progression. However, we need more studies to verify this.

Heart Disease

More than 70%[18] of people with heart failure have suboptimal selenium levels of less than <100 μg/L. This is associated with a decreased quality of life, lower exercise capacity, and a worse prognosis. 

Selenoproteins[1] (proteins containing selenium) may also impact cardiovascular health because they prevent fat oxidation, which can reduce inflammation and prevent the risk of blood clots.

At this time, however, we still need additional research[19] to confirm how selenium in food and supplements can benefit heart health.

Thyroid Health

Selenium plays a significant role in regulating thyroid function by supporting thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. Selenium concentration in the body is higher in the thyroid gland[1] than in any other area of the body.

Studies[8] suggest that having optimal levels of selenium is necessary to protect against disorders of the thyroid gland and support overall health. 

Similarly, those with a low intake of selenium-rich foods or supplements are at a greater risk for thyroid disease[20]

Again, more research is needed to determine whether selenium can prevent thyroid disease, but there is a clear connection. Many researchers[8] believe selenium has a U-Shaped relationship with thyroid disease, suggesting that too little and too much selenium in the diet can cause negative health outcomes.

Cognitive Function

Experts[21] believe selenium’s antioxidant properties can help prevent chronic oxidative stress within the brain. Oxidative stress in the brain is linked to mood disorders, behavioral problems, and reduced brain function.

In particular, there is limited evidence to suggest that selenium may be beneficial for improving cognitive function in individuals with hypothyroidism.

A newer 2021 study[22] on older American individuals also found that those with higher blood selenium levels have higher cognitive scores.

Potential Selenium Supplement Side Effects

Taking a higher than the recommended amount of selenium can lead to unpleasant symptoms. Early symptoms[1] of excess selenium intake are a metallic taste in the mouth and garlic-smelling breath.

Over time, chronically high selenium intakes can lead to

  • Hair loss
  • Nail brittleness
  • Skin lesions
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Rashes
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Spotted tooth enamel

If you take large a substantial amount of selenium at one time, it can cause acute selenium toxicity[1], which can lead to the following severe symptoms:

  • Severe stomach discomfort
  • Respiratory distress
  • Hair loss
  • Muscle tenderness
  • Kidney failure
  • Heart failure

Acute selenium toxicity is rare, and most incidents occur after someone takes an incorrectly formulated over-the-counter supplement. For example, one case report[23] found that 201 people experienced acute selenium toxicity after consuming liquid selenium drops that contained 200 times the labeled concentration of selenium. 

This is why it is best practice for your safety to choose a supplement that has been third-party tested and has a seal of approval from a governing body such as NSF.

How To Choose The Best Selenium Supplement?

There are so many selenium supplements on the market. Honestly, it can get overwhelming. A trip down the supplement aisle at your local supermarket can leave you asking, “what is the best selenium supplement?”

The good news is that we’ve done the research for you. Here are a few things to consider before purchasing selenium supplements.

Third-Party Testing

As mentioned earlier, supplements that are not formulated correctly can have adverse effects. Choose a brand that utilizes third-party testing, which involves an outside party evaluating a product and vouching for its quality.

It’s important to note that not all third-party testing is created equal. ConsumerLab, USP (United States Pharmacopeia), and NSF (National Sanitation Foundation) are the most reliable third-party testing organizations. Many supplement manufacturers also say that their product is third-party tested, but the bottle lacks an official seal of approval from these organizations to confirm this.

Ingredients

It’s also essential to carefully read the ingredient list to know what is in your supplement. Some supplements contain selenium and zinc or additional nutrients such as vitamin E. 

If you are already taking a multivitamin, check the % Daily Value (DV) for each nutrient to avoid getting too much.

Selenium Type

Selenium supplements generally exist in two forms: organic and inorganic. According to the ODS[1], both are good sources of selenium. However, many studies[24] suggest that organic selenium is better absorbed and used by the body than inorganic selenium. 

Although some prefer to consume the amino acid chelated form of selenium (selenium glycinate), there is no substantial evidence to suggest that it is absorbed more efficiently than other types of selenium supplements.

Selenium is also better absorbed in the presence of the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, and E.

Final Thought

Selenium is an essential trace mineral that aids in DNA production and the metabolism of thyroid hormones. It also helps protect against infections and cellular damage. Selenium deficiencies are linked to cognitive decline, cardiovascular disease, and a weakened immune system.

At this time, no solid research suggests there are benefits associated with taking more than the RDA for selenium.

Most experts agree that most healthy adults in the United States get enough selenium through their diet. However, some populations are at risk of a deficiency and may require supplementation.

As always, speak with your healthcare provider before changing your diet or supplement regimen.

Frequently Asked Questions

What type of selenium is the best?

Selenium in its organic form — selenomethionine — is better absorbed by the body than synthetic selenium.

When may I need a selenium supplement?

You may need a supplement if you have a diagnosed selenium deficiency. In addition, if you have a history of an autoimmune or thyroid disease, a selenium supplement may improve your condition.

When do I need to contact a doctor?

You should contact your doctor before taking selenium or other dietary supplements.

What are selenium supplement side effects?

If you take a selenium supplement long-term or take too high of a dose, it can lead to side effects. Most common side effects include hair loss, skin lesions, nausea, diarrhea, fatigue, rashes, irritability, and nail brittleness.


+ 24 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

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  2. ods.od.nih.gov. (n.d.). Office of Dietary Supplements – Selenium. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Selenium-HealthProfessional/#h6
  3. Das, D., Banerjee, A., Jena, A.B., Duttaroy, A.K. and Pathak, S. (2022). Essentiality, relevance, and efficacy of adjuvant/combinational therapy in the management of thyroid dysfunctions. Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, [online] 146, p.112613. doi:10.1016/j.biopha.2022.112613.
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Lindsey Desoto

Medically reviewed by:

Melissa Mitri

Lindsey DeSoto is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based out of Coastal Mississippi. She earned her BSc in Nutrition Sciences from the University of Alabama. Lindsey has a passion for helping others live their healthiest life by translating the latest evidence-based research into easy-to-digest, approachable content.

Medically reviewed by:

Melissa Mitri

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PubMed Central

Database From National Institute Of Health

U.S National Library of Medicine
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