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5 Best Vegan Pre-Workout Supplements in 2022

Mitchelle Morgan

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

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Transparent Labs Bulk Pre Workout

Transparent Labs Preseries Bulk Pre Workout

  • Enhances physical performance
  • Boosts concentration
  • Scientifically proven ingredients

Performance Lab SPORT Pre-Workout

Performance Lab SPORT Pre-Workout

  • Third-party tested
  • Enhance workout performance
  • Contains prebiotics

Powher Pre-Workout For Women

Powher Pre-Workout for Women

  • Specially formulated for women
  • Provides gradual muscle growth
  • Lacks the caffeine rush

Dietary supplements come in various compositions to meet a wide range of demands. Some people utilize specific powders, drinks, and capsules to help them gain muscle, lose weight, and improve their physical and mental performance.

Today we’ll look into vegan pre-workout supplements in this article. They are taken before going to the gym or beginning a training routine.

You’ll learn how they function and get five recommendations for the finest vegan pre-workout supplements in this post.

You’ll also find information about:

  • Their advantages.
  • Side effects that may occur.
  • How do you choose the best?

So, let’s get started.

Best Vegan Pre-Workout Supplements on the market in (December. 2022)

What Is Vegan Pre-Workout?

A vegan pre-workout supplement is a plant-based pre-workout product you take before a workout session. Pre-workout powders, capsules, and drinks may give you the extra boost of energy you need to finish your workouts.

They are entirely made of plant-based ingredients; not a single component comes from an animal or animal by-product. The use of these pre-workout supplements is a trend, especially with the advent of the vegan society.

Green tea extract, brown rice syrup, natural caffeine, vitamin C, green coffee extract, and coconut water are just a handful of the organic and plant-based ingredients found in practically every vegan pre-workout.

The following section looks at the top 5 best pre-workout vegan supplements.

The Line Up At A Glance

Transparent Labs Bulk Pre Workout

Editor’s Choice

Transparent Labs Preseries Bulk Pre Workout

  • Enhances physical performance
  • Boosts concentration
  • Scientifically proven ingredients

Performance Lab SPORT Pre-Workout

Best Non-stimulant Pre-workout Supplement

Performance Labs SPORT Pre-Workout

  • Third-party tested
  • Enhance workout performance
  • Contains prebiotics

Powher Pre-Workout For Women

Best Pre-workout For Women

Powher Pre-Workout for Women

  • Specially formulated for women
  • Provides gradual muscle growth
  • Lacks the caffeine rush

Naked Nutrition Natural Pre-Workout Supplement

Best All-natural Vegan Pre-workout Supplement

Naked Nutrition Natural Pre-Workout Supplement

  • Artificial additives-free
  • Contains all organic ingredients
  • Included additional minerals and vitamins

Garden of Life Sport Vegan Pre Workout Powder

Best Certified Vegan Protein Pre-Workout Powder

Garden of Life Sport Vegan Pre Workout Powder

  • Enhance muscle recovery and growth
  • Has multiple quality certifications
  • Non-GMO and gluten-free

5 Best Vegan Pre-Workout Supplements & Powders 2022

Transparent Labs Preseries Bulk Pre-Workout

This plant-based pre-workout supplement boasts a 100% transparent ingredient profile with an accurately balanced scientific dosage of 19 active ingredients.

  • It has a powerful testosterone support combination of zinc, vitamin D3, and boron which promotes lean muscle growth
  • Helps reduce muscle wastage and promotes workout recovery
  • No artificial sweeteners, colors, or preservatives
  • Some consumers expressed dissatisfaction with the taste of the supplement and shipment concerns

It does not contain creatine as in most pre-workout supplements.

Despite the lack of creatine in this pre-workout mix, the unique, very potent testosterone support complex can significantly accelerate the growth of muscle mass, making it ideal for strength training and other professional athletes looking for a better “muscle pump.”

Blue raspberry, strawberry lemonade, tropical punch, sour grape, green apple, and orange are among the six fruit varieties available.

Transparent Labs has devised a premium, incredibly effective but not too pricey solution.

Here are just a few essential components:

(Branched-Chain Amino Acids) BCAA 2:1:1

BCAAs[1] are three essential branched-chain amino acids that promote muscle building. BCAA supplementation can boost the growth of muscle mass and strength.

Supplementing BCAAs also inhibits a drop in BCAA levels in the blood, which would lead to an influx of tryptophan into the brain, accompanied by serotonin generation, resulting in increased weariness.

Beta-Alanine

It is a component of carnosine, a chemical that aids in the buffering of acids in muscles and improves athletic activity. Carnosine[2] is an antioxidant and anti-aging substance that aids in lean mass gain. The pre-workout contains 4,000 mg of beta-alanine. It’s within the recommended dose of between 2,000 and 5,000 mg for best benefits. Bets-alanine reduces acidity in the muscles thus decreasing overall fatigue while exercising.

Caffeine 

Because caffeine[3] is a powerful stimulant, it’s present in almost all pre-workout pills. It may help increase physical strength and stamina, and it’s also a nootropic because it can stimulate your neurons and provide cerebral activity. 

Caffeine can increase body fat burning by as much as 29% resulting in a decrease[4] in body mass index (BMI) and body fat reduction.

Citrulline Malate

According to existing studies, Citrulline reduces exhaustion and improves endurance in both anaerobic and aerobic workouts. It boosts the production of nitric oxide[5]. Nitric oxide allows blood, oxygen, and nutrients to travel to all parts of the body efficiently and effectively.

Nevertheless, only a limited dosage is beneficial, particularly between 6,000 and 8,000 milligrams (mg). This pre-workout pill has 6,000 mg of citrulline malate, within the acceptable range.

Taurine 

It is a beneficial ingredient for both circulation and cardiovascular health[6]. Taurine can help you with various health issues, such as lowering your risk of heart disease and removing waste products that cause tiredness and muscle burn. It also helps to increase fat loss during training, thus instrumental for a reduction in body fat percentage.

Performance Labs Sport Pre-Workout

The pre-workout product is a stimulant-free preparation with impressive outcomes thanks to a pre-workout blend of unique ingredients. Ingredients such as maritime pine bark extract and a powerful blend of citrulline and glutathione that promote workout performance provide the unique blend.

  • May improve performance during your training
  • Ingredients are combined with modern technology to aid absorption
  • It’s a prebiotic-infused supplement
  • The serving size appears to be pretty large
  • It is quite expensive

The formula contains creatine, citrulline, and beta-alanine, all associated with enhanced muscle growth and performance.

The pre-workout comes encapsulated in vegetarian capsules.

Performance Lab is open about the contents and dosages of each supplement, and they follow systematic quality control methods, similar to Transparent Labs.

The pre-workout pill contains the following ingredients:

Beta-Alanine

Beta-alanine is a fantastic supplement that improves athletic performance by increasing exercise capacity and reducing muscle fatigue.

Furthermore, it possesses immune-boosting[7], antioxidant, and anti-aging effects. The suggested dosage is 2 to 5 grams, but this pre-workout supplement only has 0.8 grams.

Citrulline 

Citrulline coupled with glutathione is extremely useful since various studies have shown that they can decrease fatigue[8] and enhance endurance during aerobic and strength-training activities.

In this situation, however, the citrulline is combined[9] with glutathione, which is basically a precursor that enhances the citrulline’s actions.

Creatine Monohydrate 

This ingredient is the most efficient form of creatine, and it is the form in which studies have proved the benefits of creatine.

Among the many advantages are improved high-intensity workout performance on intense workouts, accelerated muscle growth, and can aid in blood glucose reduction[10], to name a few benefits.

Maritime Pine Bark Extract

Athletes preparing for a fitness test or a triathlon who take this extract for eight weeks[11] appear to do better in the assessments and contests. So it appears to enhance performance.

Powher Pre-Workout For Women

The ingredients in Powher pre-workout may help women lose some weight, decrease fatigue, burn fat, develop muscle, and enhance energy without raising their blood pressure.

  • May help with women’s muscular growth 
  • Strength improvement
  • Consistent strength and focus each day
  • There are no “caffeine crashes”
  • Each scoop may contain artificial ingredients

Since most of the great pre-workout supplements are for men, you may find them with ingredients that promote aggressive augmentation of muscle endurance, excess energy levels, and speedy muscle growth. But that is not how women train.

Ladies mostly train to keep the fit, tone, and gain flexibility, which may be a struggle when you are heavy. Instead, these products offer women a progressive gain that is not too fast or too aggressive.

Here are some of the active ingredients in this powder that can make a tasty pre-workout drink before you enter the gym:

Beta-alanine carnosine is a nutrient that is recognized for reducing neuromuscular exhaustion during a strenuous workout. It allows you to go longer and have more energy.

Caffeine from natural sources boosts energy, attentiveness, and focused attention, especially if you don’t get enough rest before an exercise.

Coconut water powder[12] is high in minerals, vitamins, and electrolytes like calcium, potassium, sodium, and magnesium.

Enextra: This supplement combines several natural stimulants and brain boosters, including Alpinia galanga[13].

L-citrulline malate[14] is an amino acid that may help to improve strength and flexibility in the gym.

L-tyrosine[15] is an amino acid that aids the body’s natural production of norepinephrine, dopamine, and epinephrine.

Oxyjun[16] is a supplement that improves cardiac performance and endurance by providing your muscles with oxygen more quickly. It is a trademarked formula of a tree extract from Terminalia arjuna.

Rednite[17] is a nitrate-rich variety of beetroot that provides 100% of the antioxidants found in regular beetroot, making it ideal for improving neuromuscular performance while training. Turmeric, piperine, cayenne pepper, and raspberry ketones are among the active components and natural constituents in Powher.

Naked Nutrition Natural Pre-Workout Supplement

The brand Naked Nutrition pre-workout supplement contains ten high-quality ingredients free of artificial sweeteners, dyes, or flavors. It’s suitable for people with special dietary needs.

  • The ingredients are simple but powerful
  • No artificial sweeteners or dyes
  • Average pricing but has 20-30 more servings
  • Included minerals and vitamins that may be deficient in a vegan diet
  • Not clearly dosed

You’ll find actual, science-backed ingredients mainly included to increase your workout endurance among the many compounds.

Here is a list of ingredients that make this product one of the best pre-workout vegan powders:

Arginine

It[18] is a conditionally essential amino acid popular among athletes since it boosts the body’s nitric[18] oxide activity. On the other hand, citrulline is far more effective than arginine at transforming plasma arginine and increasing nitric oxide content in the body.

The levels are linked to improved blood flow and decreased blood pressure, impacting exercise performance. It makes this formula an organic nitric oxide blend.

Beta-Alanine

Naked Nutrition has pinpointed the optimal beta-alanine dosage as between 2 and 5 grams[19]. This pre-workout pill offers 2,0000 micrograms (mcg) of beta-alanine, the recommended dose for decreased fatigue and increased endurance during workouts.

Creatine Monohydrate

It will help you boost resistance training energy output during intense workouts and lean muscle mass.

Natural Caffeine

This natural pre-workout supplement contains caffeine taken from natural, unroasted coffee beans, and it comes in a 200 mg dose that will help you get the energy you need.

Assorted Vitamins

This vegan pre-workout supplement by Naked Nutrition also contains niacin, vitamin B12, vitamin c[20], and calcium, among other minerals and vitamins beneficial to a healthy vegan diet.

Garden of Life Sport Vegan Pre-Workout Powder

Garden of Life Vegan Protein Powder is a certified organic protein formula taken from several sources, including navy beans, peas, garbanzo beans, lentils, and cranberry seed protein to provide all the essential amino acids.

  • Muscles are repaired and restored, allowing for a speedier recovery
  • May improve your immune system and digestion
  • No fillers, toxins, or synthetic chemicals in this product
  • Contains antioxidants in abundance
  • USDA certified organic, sports-certified, and vegan
  • Gluten-free and non-GMO ( free of genetically modified organisms, GMO)
  • Good for people sensitive to or intolerant to dairy
  • It’s a little more pricey than your typical protein powder
  • Not good for people with caffeine sensitivity

BCAAs

A serving containing two scoops delivers 30 grams of protein sources, including all essential amino acids, 5.5 grams of BCAAs (branched-chain amino acids), and 5 grams of glutamine, which can help you recover faster after your workout.

The BCAAs[21] improve training results by reducing protein and organic muscle breakdown during high-intensity exercise. It ensures that all of your branched-chain amino acids are derived from organic and natural ingredient sources and that none are artificial.

Natural Fruits

Tart cherries, goji berries, turmeric, apples, and blueberries are the other organic ingredients in the Garden of Life Sports recovery mixture, also called the organic muscle recovery blend. These antioxidants might help you recuperate faster.

Because many athletes’ immune systems are fragile due to intense exercise, the pre-workout contains 2 billion colony forming units (CFU) of a particular, clinically studied probiotic[22]. This could play a key role in promoting immunological health, assisting digestion, and improving nutrient absorption during intensive activities.

According to one study, individuals with high blood pressure who took 3 grams of pea protein[23] supplements saw their blood pressure drop.

It does not contain gluten, dairy, fillers, added sugars, tree nuts, and synthetic dyes. It also lacks soy, artificial flavors, sweeteners, additives, or other hazardous chemicals.

Benefits of Vegan Pre-Workout Supplements

There are numerous benefits that vegan pre-workout supplements offer the body. And all depend on the ingredient profile of the individual vegan pre-workout supplement.

All in all, here are the general benefits you can get from using these vegan pre-workout formula products:

  • They may improve physical performance by offering the body a clean energy boost
  • They support muscle performance, growth, and recovery
  • They may enable maximum muscle pumps at the gym
  • They may help users with better mental focus
  • They may facilitate weight loss
  • They may boost blood flow

Potential Side Effects

Here are some of the possible side effects of vegan pre-workouts on your body. The side effects may depend on your health, eating habits, and ingredients.

For example, if you are allergic to green tea, a vegan pre-workout pill containing green tea extract will undoubtedly cause you to react. As a result, please be aware of your sensitivity and avoid the ingredients.

Also, keep in mind that you may not experience any of these side effects if you take the appropriate dosages. They usually occur when you exceed the recommended dosage or are sensitive to them.

  • Caffeine: May cause jitters, headaches, nausea, increased heart rate, anxiety, digestion issues, vomiting.
  • Creatine: May cause bloating, water retention, digestive issues.
  • Sodium bicarbonate and magnesium: May cause digestive issues, diarrhea.
  • Citrulline: May cause headaches.
  • Beta-alanine and niacin: May cause a tingling feeling or red patches.

These consequences could be moderate or severe. On that note, it is critical to adhere to the recommended dosages and use them according to the supervision of a medical professional.

Aside from usage and dosage, make sure you buy a high-quality pre-workout powder, capsule, or liquid from a reputable website or store. That way, you can avoid any problems arising from utilizing counterfeit products. 

Cheap pre-workout supplements may appear to be the best method to save money, but you jeopardize your health.

How To Choose A Vegan Pre Workout Supplement?

There are many brands of vegan pre-workouts in the market, so how do you choose the best product?

Indeed, you cannot buy all of them and become a tester yourself. So much so, here is a simple guideline to show you what to buy and what not to.

Testing

Some businesses will contract a third party to do independent testing, such as the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF), Informed-Sport, U.S. Pharmacopeia, or Informed Choice. The companies will not only test items for the presence of prohibited substances, but they will also test the manufacturing and storage sites.

The testing is mainly based on scientifically proven ingredients to ascertain the credibility of what the brands promise their products to achieve. You are confident that a pre-workout meets the manufacturer’s claims through tests.

Transparency

Transparency is when a company is willing to disclose the results of the tests done on their product to create better credibility with their users.

Some products have proprietary blends which contain known substances but with undisclosed proportions.

After conducting studies and discovering that a specific ingredient is only helpful at specific levels, it becomes hard to determine whether or not a substance with a proprietary mix is effective and thus demonstrates an utter lack of openness.

Dosage

While it is possible to acquire supplements with “science-backed” ingredients, it is also possible to discover companies that do not use the proper amounts. They reduce the quality of these ingredients by using amounts that are not effective.

Citrulline, for example, must be present in amounts of five grams or more to have any impact; otherwise, it will have no effect. There are some compounds (tyrosine, for example) for which it is difficult to determine the proper dosage. Still, it is feasible to assess the correct amount if you have supporting data.

Final Thought

The five vegan pre-workout supplements above are simply the best five from a basket of many more. One notable brand is the Infinity Pre-workout which may enhance the physical and mental performance of the user.

Most importantly, seek medical advice first. It helps shed light on your health status and allows the licensed healthcare provider to recommend the best vegan pre-workout.

Doctors can help avoid potential sensitivities on any ingredient, such as green coffee extract or green tea extract. Read reviews, labels, and lab reports to ascertain what your pre-workout shake contains.

Besides that, ensure that you get the authentic product and use it in the recommended dosages for best results.

Frequently Asked Questions

Do caffeine-free pre-workouts work?

Non-stimulant pre-workout supplements can still provide energy, but they are devoid of caffeine. Instead, they use substances that promote blood flow, such as Beta-Alanine, TeaCrine, and Nitrosigine, to boost alertness and attention.

With what should I combine my vegan pre-workout?

You can take a vegan pre-workout can in three different ways: 1. Mix one serving with water for a pre-workout energy shot. 2. Energy Drink for Pre-Workout: Prepare green tea or yerba mate tea the night before your morning workout. Refrigerate overnight and eat the next day. 3. Blend one serving with fruit and water for a pre-workout energy shake.

Is it safe to consume pre-workout daily?

You can take pre-workout vitamins regularly, although not necessarily daily. If you go to the gym three times a week, for example, on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, those are the optimum days to take your pre-workout supplement. You risk getting side effects when you consume more than the prescribed dose/amount per serving.


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Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

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Mitchelle Morgan

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Mitchelle Morgan is a health and wellness writer with over 10 years of experience. She holds a Master's in Communication. Her mission is to provide readers with information that helps them live a better lifestyle. All her work is backed by scientific evidence to ensure readers get valuable and actionable content.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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