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Exercise Statistics & Facts In 2024 Will Surprise You

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

exercise statistics
Statistics show many people don’t get enough exercise. Photo: muse studio/Shutterstock

Most of us know that exercise is important for physical health, but that doesn’t mean we get enough of it. Exercise statistics are quite enlightening, as they provide insight into the proportion of Americans who don’t get enough exercise. 

Below, learn the latest exercise stats. Hopefully, learning this information will motivate you to take charge of your health and get the exercise you need.

Key Exercise Facts

  • Only 24.2%[1] of U.S. adults met guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise in 2020. 
  • Among men, 28.3%[1] meet exercise guidelines, compared to 20.4%[1] of women.
  • Among all adults, 46.9%[1] get enough aerobic activity, compared to 31.0%[1] who get enough muscle-strengthening activity. 
  • Among children aged 6 to 17, 24%[2] get 60 minutes of physical activity per day.
  • Among high school students, 26.1%[2] get at least 60 minutes of physical activity daily.

Exercise Statistics

Exercise Time Statistics

Exercise Time Statistics
Almost one-quarter of people don’t exercise at all. Photo: Team Design
  • In 2018, 24.2%[3] of people surveyed did not exercise or participate in sports. 
  • In the same year, 18.3%[3] of people stated they got under an hour of exercise per week.
  • The percentages of people in other weekly exercise ranges were as follows:
    • One to two hours: 15.15%.[3]
    • Three to four hours: 14.63%.[3]
    • Five to six hours: 10.17%.[3]
    • Seven to eight hours: 7.22%.[3]
    • Nine to 10 hours: 4.03%.[3]
    • 11 or more hours: 5.56%.[3]

A significant proportion of people do not get much exercise. Nearly one-quarter[3] do not exercise at all, and almost one-fifth[3] get less than an hour of exercise weekly.  

Exercise Statistics By Age And Sex

Exercise Statistics By Age And Sex
For all ages, more men get adequate exercise than women. Photo: Team Design
  • Overall, 28.3%[1] of men and 20.4%[1] of women got enough aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise in 2018. 
  • Among those aged 18-34, 41.3%[1] of men and 28.7%[1] of women got enough exercise. 
  • In the age range of 35-49, 29.4%[1] of men and 22.7%[1] of women got enough exercise.
  • Among those aged 50-64, 21.6%[1] of men and 17.6%[1] of women got sufficient exercise.
  • In the age bracket of 65 and up, 15.3%[1] of men and 10.8%[1] of women exercise sufficiently.

Compared to women, men in all age brackets are more likely[1] to get enough aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise. In addition, the percentage of people getting sufficient activity declines[1] with increasing age. This is true for both men and women. 

These physical exercise statistics are based on the percentage of adults meeting physical activity guidelines. These guidelines[4] state adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise weekly. Guidelines also state adults should do muscle-strengthening activities incorporating all major muscle groups at least twice weekly. 

According to government physical activity guidelines, moderate exercise[4] includes activities like brisk walking at 2.5-4 mph. Vigorous aerobic exercise[4] involves running, jogging, or taking an intense fitness class. 

Exercise Statistics By Race

Exercise Statistics By Race
Men of all races get more exercise compared to women. Photo: Team Design
  • Among non-Hispanic Whites, 30.5%[1] of men and 24.3%[1] of women get enough aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise.
  • In non-Hispanic Blacks, 29.7%[1] of men and 16.5%[1] of women get enough exercise.
  • Among Hispanics, 23.5%[1] of men and 18.0%[1] of women get sufficient exercise. 
  • In non-Hispanic Asians, 30.2%[1] of men and 16.7%[1] of women get enough exercise. 

Men of all races are more likely[1] than women to meet guidelines for aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise. The highest rates[1] of adherence to exercise guidelines are for non-Hispanic White men, closely followed by non-Hispanic Asian men. Hispanic men are least likely[1] to meet exercise guidelines.

Among women, non-Hispanic Whites are most likely[1] to get sufficient aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise. Non-Hispanic Black women are least likely[1] to meet exercise guidelines. 

According to Sean Klein, certified personal trainer and founder of https://programme.app/,[5] “Historically, men have been encouraged to participate in more physical activities than women, leading to a higher tendency for exercise.” He further states, “This way, men also have more opportunities for physical activity due to their involvement in sports or other physically demanding jobs.” 

Andrew White, a certified personal trainer through the National Association of Sports Medicine, agrees. He states, “Historically, fitness spaces have been male-dominated, making them less

inviting for women.” He also adds, “Women also often shoulder more domestic responsibilities, such as childcare and household chores, limiting their time available for exercise: White is also the co-founder of garagegympro.com. 

Exercise Statistics By Income

Exercise Statistics By Income
Exercise adherence varies by family income level. Photo: Team Design
  • Among men under 100% of the Federal Poverty Level, 16.2%[1] get sufficient aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise.
  • Among those at 100%-199% of FPL, 20.0%[1] of men meet exercise guidelines.
  • In men with incomes at least 200% of the FPL, 32.4%[1] get enough exercise.
  • In women under 100% of FPL, 9.9%[1] get enough exercise.
  • In women at 100%-199% of FPL, 13.6%[1] get enough exercise. This is compared to 25.9%[1] earning at least 200% of FPL.

In both men and women, exercise adherence increases[1] with increasing income. Men of all income ranges are more likely[1] to get sufficient exercise compared to women. 

According to Andrew White, NASM certified personal trainer, “Income levels significantly impact an individual’s access to exercise opportunities.” He further states, “Those with higher incomes often have easier access to fitness facilities and equipment, and their living environments may include personal gyms or neighborhoods with parks and running tracks.” This explains why people of higher income levels are more likely to meet exercise guidelines. 

Exercise Facts To Know

Above, we’ve provided physical exercise stats for adults. There is additional information to know about exercise, including exercise rates among children.

Most Children Don’t Get Enough Exercise 

Physical activity guidelines[4] state that children aged six to 17 should get at least 60 minutes of daily exercise. Most exercise should consist of aerobic physical activity, and children should exercise vigorously at least three times weekly. Children should also do muscle and bone-strengthening exercises at least three times weekly as part of their 60 minutes of activity. 

Unfortunately, many children do not meet these guidelines for physical activity. In 2017, just 24%[2] of children ages six to 17 got enough exercise. Furthermore, only 26.1%[2] of high schoolers met exercise guidelines. 

Among high school students, 51.1%[2] did muscle-strengthening activities at least three times per week in 2017. 

Physical Inactivity Is A Global Concern

Physical exercise statistics show that European countries also struggle with a lack of physical activity among citizens. A study of 28 European countries found that 36.2%[6] of people in these countries are physically inactive. The World Health Organization health statistics show that 80% of adolescents and 27% of adults do not meet their recommended levels[7] of physical activity.

As is the case in the United States, European women are less likely[6] than men to get enough exercise. European adults 40-54 and 55-64 are less likely[6] to exercise in moderate to high amounts than those 18-24. 

In an Ethiopian study in 2016, 54.9%[8] of adults reported being physically active. Among men, 63.9%[8] were physically active, compared to 50.6%[8] of women.

Physical Activity Levels Vary By State

Statistics about working out show that there is wide variation in exercise habits among states. Colorado has the lowest rates of physical inactivity, at 17.7%.[9] In addition to Colorado, Utah, Washington, and Vermont have rates of physical inactivity under 20%.[9] 

Puerto Rico and seven different U.S. states had physical inactivity levels over 30%.[9] These states included West Virginia, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Alabama, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Mississippi. 
Southern states have the highest average rates of physical inactivity, at 27.5%.[9] The rate of physical inactivity is 25.2%[9] in the Midwest and 24.7%[9] in the Northeast. It is 21.0%[9] in the West.

The Importance Of Exercise For Health

The low proportion of people who get regular physical activity is concerning because exercise provides many health benefits.  On the other hand, a sedentary lifestyle comes with health risks. These facts are described in more detail below.

Heart Health Benefits

Regular physical activity is beneficial for heart health. It reduces the risk that someone will develop heart disease.[10] It also lowers the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. 

Exercise protects heart health by reducing blood pressure[11] and blood cholesterol levels. In fact, exercise is so beneficial that it’s the first line of treatment[11] for mildly to moderate high blood pressure. 

Reduced Risk Of Cancer

People who exercise regularly are at lower risk of cancer. Statistics on the benefits of exercise show that exercise reduces cancer risk by 10%-20%.[12]

Meeting guidelines for moderate or greater intensity exercise can reduce the risk of the following cancers:[12]

  • Bladder cancer.
  • Breast cancer.
  • Colon cancer.
  • Endometrial cancer.
  • Esophageal cancer. 

Lower Risk Of Death

Active adults are at a lower risk of dying from all causes. Those who get the recommended amounts of aerobic or muscle-strengthening activity are at reduced risk[13] of death. 

More specifically, health statistics show that regular exercise reduces the risk of death[13] from  heart disease, cancer, and chronic lower respiratory tract conditions and improves current health status. Meeting guidelines for both aerobic physical activity and muscle-strengthening exercises reduces death risk by 40%.[13] 

For people with chronic conditions, physical activity[4] improves the quality of life and reduces the risk of death from those conditions. 

Improved Mental Health

Physical activity has been found to improve brain health,[4] which is beneficial for mental health functioning. Improvements in brain health from exercise can lead to better cognitive functioning and reduced risk of depression and anxiety. 

Reduced Diabetes Risk

Regular physical activities can prevent diabetes[14] or delay its development. Aerobic exercise and strength training increase insulin sensitivity. This is associated with reduced diabetes risk.

In those who have diabetes, exercise improves overall health. This is true for individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. 

Immune System Functioning

Getting enough physical activity can enhance the functioning of the immune system.[15] Regular moderate exercise is especially effective for immune system health. It can reduce inflammation and stress, promoting a healthy immune system.  While moderate exercise benefits immunity, repeated, intense exercise[15] may be detrimental. Intensive training, such as training for a marathon, can weaken the immune system response.

Weight Management

Regular physical activity also plays a role in weight management. Exercise burns calories, which puts a person in a negative energy balance.[16] This means they’re burning more calories than they consume, which is essential for weight loss

Exercise is associated with weight loss[16] and loss of body fat. It can also help people to maintain their weight loss over time. This is important because weight regain is common. 

Benefits For Children And Older Adults 

In addition to the general health benefits of exercise, there are specific benefits for certain age groups. 

In children,[2] exercise is associated with better grades, improved memory, and consistent school attendance. Children who regularly exercise also have improved concentration and better behavior in the school classroom. 

In older adults, regular exercise reduces[4] the risk of falls, according to health statistics related to the benefits of exercise. 

The Risks Of Not Exercising

Regular exercise comes with health benefits, whereas not exercising is damaging to health. Sedentary behavior[2] can lead to positive energy balance, meaning a person eats more calories than they burn. Over time, this can cause weight gain and obesity.

Other health risks[2] associated with lack of physical activity include increased risk of the following health conditions:

  • Increased risk of all types of heart disease, including coronary heart disease.
  • Increased blood pressure, blood cholesterol, and triglycerides.
  • Higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes because of increases in blood sugar combined with reduced insulin sensitivity. 
  • Reduced bone mineral density, which can cause osteoporosis.
  • Higher risk of various types of cancer. 

How To Make Exercise A Part Of Your Regular Routine

Clearly, there are benefits associated with following physical activity guidelines. If you do not get the recommended amount of physical activity, you can make changes to improve your current health status.

Remember, government guidelines recommend that adults get at least 150 minutes[4] of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise weekly. Moderate-intensity exercise means working out at an age-adjusted (220-age) target heart rate[17] of 64%-76%. Adults should also do strength training exercises, targeting all major muscle groups, twice weekly. 

If you’re currently not getting enough exercise for your age group, it can be helpful to start small. The benefits of physical activity, such as decreased diabetes risk, begin below the recommended[4] 150 minutes/week. This means that you can enjoy the health benefits of physical activity, even if you aren’t quite meeting guidelines.

To get 150 minutes of moderate or greater intensity exercise weekly, you could walk briskly for 30 minutes five times weekly. If this is too much, start with two or three weekly walks, and work your way up. You might also prefer workouts on a cardio machine, like an elliptical. 

Muscle-strengthening guidelines require you to work your muscles[4] harder than usual. This involves creating resistance by using bands, weights, or body weight. According to the CDC,[18] adults need to follow muscle-strengthening guidelines two days a week. 

You should gradually work your way up to two weekly strength training sessions. Incorporate all muscle groups, including legs, hips, arms, shoulders, core, chest, and back. 

Be sure to consult with a doctor before starting any new exercise program. Sean Klein, certified personal trainer recommends, “I suggest finding an exercise routine that fits your lifestyle and interests.” He concludes, “It’s important to make it a priority and schedule it into your day, just like any other appointment or commitment.” 

Conclusion

Statistics related to physical activity show that most U.S. adults are not sufficiently physically active. The percentage of people who meet physical activity guidelines varies by race, sex, income, and age. However, overall, 28.3%[1] of men and 20.4%[1] of women got enough aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise in 2018. 

These statistics demonstrate that many people are missing out on the benefits of regular exercise. If you’re not regularly active, it can be helpful to incorporate more exercise into your routine. Learn about the physical activity guidelines, and take steps to increase your daily exercise. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Does walking count as exercise?

Walking at a pace of 2.5 mph to 4.0 mph or 64%-76% of maximum heart rate constitutes moderate-intensity exercise. Regular walking can help you to meet physical activity guidelines. 

Is it OK if I never exercise?

Lack of exercise is associated with numerous health risks.[2] These include increased risk of heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Lack of exercise can also lead to weight gain and obesity.

Is walking 1 hour a day enough exercise?

Walking one hour per day would mean getting 420 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise a week. This exceeds the recommended minimum of 150 minutes[4] per week. You’d also need to do strength training two times per week to meet the guidelines.[4]


+ 18 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Anon, (2024). Products – Data Briefs – Number 443 – August 2022. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db443.htm.
  2. Anon, (2024). Physical Activity Facts. [online] Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/healthyschools/physicalactivity/facts.htm#:~:text=Less%20than%20one%2Dquarter%20(24,of%20physical%20activity%20every%20day.&text=In%202017%2C%20only%2026.1%25%20of,days%20of%20the%20previous%20week.
  3. Statista. (2016). U.S. – number of hours spent on exercise/participating in sport activities 2016-2018 | Statista. [online] Available at: https://www.statista.com/statistics/562577/us-number-of-hours-spent-on-exercise-participating-in-sport-activities/.
  4. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2018). Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans 2nd edition. [online] health.gov, pp.1–118. Available at: https://health.gov/sites/default/files/2019-09/Physical_Activity_Guidelines_2nd_edition.pdf.
  5. Programme. (2024). Programme. [online] Available at: https://programme.app/.
  6. Oup.com. (2024). Available at: https://academic.oup.com/eurpub/article/31/4/840/6277121.
  7. Who.int. (2022). The Global Status Report on Physical Activity 2022. [online] Available at: https://www.who.int/teams/health-promotion/physical-activity/global-status-report-on-physical-activity-2022#:~:text=Let’s%20get%20moving!&text=Regular%20physical%20activity%20promotes%20both,recommended%20levels%20of%20physical%20activity.
  8. Melkamu Merid Mengesha, Hirbo Shore Roba, Behailu Hawulte Ayele and Addisu Shunu Beyene (2019). Level of physical activity among urban adults and the socio-demographic correlates: a population-based cross-sectional study using the global physical activity questionnaire. BMC Public Health, [online] 19(1). doi:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-019-7465-y.
  9. CDC (2023). Adult Physical Inactivity Prevalence Maps by Race/Ethnicity . [online] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/data/inactivity-prevalence-maps/index.html#Location.
  10. Nystoriak, M.A. and Bhatnagar, A. (2018). Cardiovascular Effects and Benefits of Exercise. Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, [online] 5. doi:https://doi.org/10.3389/fcvm.2018.00135.
  11. Bethany Barone Gibbs, Marie‐France Hivert, Jerome, G.J., Kraus, W.E., Rosenkranz, S.K., Schorr, E., Spartano, N.L. and Lobelo, F. (2021). Physical Activity as a Critical Component of First-Line Treatment for Elevated Blood Pressure or Cholesterol: Who, What, and How?: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. Hypertension, [online] 78(2). doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/hyp.0000000000000196.
  12. McTiernan, A., Friedenreich, C.M., Katzmarzyk, P.T., Powell, K.E., Macko, R.F., Buchner, D.M., Pescatello, L.S., Bloodgood, B., Tennant, B., Vaux-Bjerke, A., George, S.M., Troiano, R.P. and Piercy, K.L. (2019). Physical Activity in Cancer Prevention and Survival: A Systematic Review. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, [online] 51(6), pp.1252–1261. doi:https://doi.org/10.1249/mss.0000000000001937.
  13. Zhao, M., Veeranki, S.P., Magnussen, C.G. and Xi, B. (2020). Recommended physical activity and all cause and cause specific mortality in US adults: prospective cohort study. The BMJ, [online] pp.m2031–m2031. doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.m2031.
  14. Colberg, S.R., Sigal, R.J., Yardley, J.E., Riddell, M.C., Dunstan, D.W., Dempsey, P.C., Horton, E.S., Castorino, K. and Tate, D.F. (2016). Physical Activity/Exercise and Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes Care, [online] 39(11), pp.2065–2079. doi:https://doi.org/10.2337/dc16-1728.
  15. Simpson, R.J., Kunz, H., Agha, N.H. and Graff, R.M. (2015). Exercise and the Regulation of Immune Functions. Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science, [online] pp.355–380. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pmbts.2015.08.001.
  16. Anatoli Petridou, Aikaterina Siopi and Vassilis Mougios (2019). Exercise in the management of obesity. Metabolism, [online] 92, pp.163–169. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.metabol.2018.10.009.
  17. Kyral, A.M., Shipherd, A.M. and Hearon, C.M. (2019). The Effect of Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise on Affect and Exercise Intention in Active and Inactive College Students. International journal of exercise science, [online] 12(5), pp.1070–1079. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6719814/.
  18. CDC (2023). How much physical activity do adults need? [online] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adults/index.htm.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Jennifer has written health and wellness content for over 10 years. In addition to this experience, she is a practicing mental health clinician and university professor. She has taught group fitness classes at a local gym for the past 4 years.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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