How To Gain Weight In Your Butt? Exercises & Diet Plan To Follow 2022

Giovanna Rosario

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

how to gain weight in your butt

The buttocks are considered the body’s powerhouse. Having a curvaceous body will be mostly dependent on genetics. Although, that does not mean that it’s impossible. With small changes in what you eat and a workout routine, you can increase the size of this muscle group.

A healthy lifestyle and consistency will be a great asset in achieving a bigger butt. 

Can You Gain Weight In Butt?

The short answer is yes. However, the weight you gain might not be fat tissue, you may gain muscle weight. targeted.

When we start increasing calories, the excess energy not used is stored as fat. The way our bodies store fat is not targeted. We cannot choose where we gain body fat. This targeted gain can mainly be achieved by increasing muscle mass. 

But how to gain weight in your butt? The following tips will help you increase muscle growth and support weight gain. 

Eat a surplus of calories

how to gain weight in your butt

To achieve an increase in weight, you need to increase the number of calories you would usually eat. Consider consuming 250-500 calories in excess to help with a gain of 0.5-1lb per week. This surplus of calories might help you gain weight in the buttocks and thighs, alongside a workout routine.

You can use this calorie estimator[1] to determine how many calories you need to consume daily. 

Eat more frequent meals

how to gain weight in your butt

 It might be easier to include more calories if you eat more frequently. Secure three meals and high-calorie snacks in between. 

Consider snacks high in protein like greek yogurt, a handful of nuts, a cheese stick, or a glass of milk. Other options include nut butter with fruit or pairing fruit with nuts or cheese. This might help you easily achieve a calorie surplus. 

Proteins

how to gain weight in your butt

If you are working on increasing lean muscle, increasing your protein intake might be right for you. Our bodies can break down foods high in proteins into amino acids and then use them to build muscles. It is recommended that people consume between[2] 0.5-0.8 grams of protein per pound of body weight per day. 

Eat a variety of foods

how to gain weight in your butt

Although there is an emphasis on making sure you eat enough protein, other food groups play a role in exercise performance and muscle growth.

Starches are a source of energy and will fuel your workouts.  Choose whole grains or a high-fiber option whenever possible. Fiber keeps your gut healthy and moving.  Options include potatoes, brown rice, whole grain pasta, and whole grain bread. 

Including healthy fats in your diet will boost calories but can also provide some essential fats like omega-3. Choose healthier fats like avocado, nuts, olive oil, and canola oil. 

Last but not least, don’t forget fruits and vegetables. They are not only a good source of vitamins and minerals but also a multitude of health-protective agents. Fruits and vegetables are also sources of energy, fiber, and various nutrients. Assure of a variety of colors on your plate. 

Recovery

how to gain weight in your butt

When working on muscle building, rest is important. Make sure to get 8-10 hours of sleep every night. A study[3] showed how sleep loss negatively affected exercise performance. In addition, adequate rest will help with muscle recovery.

Consider supplementing with casein pre-sleep to support muscle recovery and building. A review article[4] recommended using at least 40-48 grams of casein 30 minutes before sleep to reduce inflammation and muscle soreness. 

Hydration

how to gain weight in your butt

Drink water whenever you are thirsty. Straw or lemonade color urine is what you should strive for as an indicator of proper hydration[5]. Drink water primarily for hydration before, during, and after your workouts. If you work out for over two hours, consider including a sports drink[6] to replenish electrolytes with hydration. 

High protein-calorie supplements

how to gain weight in your butt

If you feel that eating more is not an option, you can consider supplementing with a protein shake. A protein supplement might help you receive more nutrients to increase muscle mass. Making protein shakes with additional sources of calories such as ground flax seeds, fruit, yogurt, or extra virgin olive oil will also boost energy intake.

There are alternatives to whey and casein supplements, like pea protein[7], which may be easier to digest and is vegan. Pea protein supplements which are combined with another complementary protein to get all nine of your essential amino acids will still provide plant-based protein and calories. Choose an alternative that fits your needs. 

Foods That Make Your Butt Bigger

Include nutritious foods into your diet to help you achieve a bigger booty. These five foods are a must-have in your pantry to increase body weight.

Pinto Beans

how to gain weight in your butt

One cup of pinto beans[8] has 11 grams of protein, 15 grams of fiber, and 245 calories. Beans are also low in the glycemic index. This edible seed or pulse is not only tasty and filling but versatile. And even though some recipes require added sugar, you can choose alternatives without. 

Try a bean salad; this way, you can have a big bowl in the fridge and use it up during the week. You can also make rice and beans, or bean soup. 

Chicken

how to gain weight in your butt

Chicken is a staple food for people working on muscle building. It is a source of high-biological value protein. Around three and a half ounces of chicken breast[9] has 32 grams of protein. High biological value refers to having the right amount of amino acids in the correct proportions to meet bodily needs for building muscle and carrying out bodily functions.

Prepare it roasted, pan-roasted, or stewed. After it’s cooked, you can pair it up with starch and a vegetable of choice. You can also prepare rice dishes topped with salsa, beans, veggies, and cubed chicken. 

Feel free to try turkey, but remove the skin to decrease the intake of saturated fats. 

Brown Rice

how to gain weight in your butt

This grain is packed with energy, fiber, and B vitamins to help with energy metabolism. One cup of brown rice[10] contains 218 calories, 5 grams of protein, and 3.5 grams of fiber. Brown rice contains antioxidants[11] that may protect the body from oxidative stress. 

Rice is very versatile and filling. Season with herbs and spices to add aroma and flavor. It can be a part of a stir fry with vegetables and egg whites. 

Beets  

how to gain weight in your butt

This nutrient-rich food is a low-calorie source of nitrates. Beets[12] have the potential to help improve the endurance of physical performance with increased blood flow. It is also a good source of manganese and copper to maintain bone health. 

Beets may have less of a glycemic impact when boiled. They can also be roasted or grated fresh on top of a salad. You can be bold and include them in your smoothies. 

Avocado

how to gain weight in your butt

This fruit is a source of monounsaturated fats[13], which can help reduce the risk of heart disease. In addition, it is a source of fiber. Eating avocados can also boost healthy calories as one-fourth of an avocado[14] will add around 80 calories. 

Add avocado as a side dish on your plate. Include it in your dishes, sandwiches, wraps, and salads. You can also include it in a fruit smoothie. 

Workouts To Increase the Size of Your Buttocks

Your buttocks are composed of multiple muscles. If you want to increase the size of your butt and thigh muscles, include these exercises in your routine. It may be beneficial to do 1-3 sets of 8-12 repetitions, 2-3 times a week of these workouts. Rest 1-2 minutes between exercises. 

You can complete these exercises at home or at your local gym. Consult a physical trainer for a more personalized, targeted workout focusing on your booty. 

Hip Thrusts

Hip Thrusts

This exercise will work your butt, thighs, and hip muscles. You may add weight or resistance.

How to:

Lay down on the floor. Bend knees and have heels as close to your butt. Then thrust your hips up and squeeze your buttocks. That will be your repetition (rep). Lower your butt to the floor. 

Try this exercise elevated with your upper back on a bench. Knees bent and feet on the floor. Lift your hips parallel with the bench, and then lower. 

Squats

Squats

This is an excellent exercise to work for different lower body muscle groups.  You can do this exercise without the weight if you are just starting. Use a barbell, free weights, or a resistance band. 

How to:

Stand up with legs hip-width apart. Lower your butt until your legs are around the height of your knees. Then rise. 

Good Mornings

Good Mornings

Doing this exercise can help strengthen and build your hamstrings and buttocks. It may also help with proper posture. Start without resistance. Once comfortable, add weight or a resistance band. 

How to:

It is important to perform this exercise in good form. Stand with feet hip-width apart and place hands slightly behind your head. Keeping your back in a neutral position, hinge at your hips until your torso is parallel to the floor. Hold for a second. Maintain your core tight. Then lift your torso keeping your back straight. That’s one rep. 

Lunges

Lunges

This exercise can work the buttocks, calves, hips, and thigh muscles. You can start without any weights or resistance. 

How to: 

Stand with legs hip-width apart. Step one leg in front of you farther than your walking stride. Bend both legs, lowering your body, until the legs are at a 90-degree angle. Your front thigh should be parallel to the floor. Keep your chest up. Distribute your weight evenly on both legs for balance. Straighten your legs to lift. That will be one repetition. 

You can complete all repetitions in one leg and then change legs.

Donkey Kicks

Donkey Kicks

These kicks will work directly on your butt muscles. 

How to:

Lower yourself to the floor on all fours. Place your knees below your hips and arms straight below your shoulders. Keeping your core tight, lift one leg back bent at a 90-degree angle. Your foot should be lifted towards the ceiling. Lower your knee back to the floor to finish the rep. Repeat with the other leg. That is one rep.

The Bottom Line

The butt is considered the powerhouse of the body. Genetics plays a big part in determining how much fat is stored in our lower body. With weight training and adequate nutrition, gaining weight in target areas is possible. 

Consistency is a big part of achieving any goal. Gaining weight and strength in your butt and thighs may translate into safe activities of daily living. You should be successful in the end by setting a goal for building muscle in your butt and using butt workouts and essential nutrients as building blocks to reaching your goal.


+ 14 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Nih.gov. (2022). Body Weight Planner | NIDDK. [online] Available at: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/bwp
  2. PROTEIN INTAKE FOR OPTIMAL MUSCLE MAINTENANCE. (n.d.). [online] Available at: https://www.acsm.org/docs/default-source/files-for-resource-library/protein-intake-for-optimal-muscle-maintenance.pdf.
  3. Craven, J., McCartney, D., Desbrow, B., Sabapathy, S., Bellinger, P., Roberts, L. and Irwin, C. (2022). Effects of Acute Sleep Loss on Physical Performance: A Systematic and Meta-Analytical Review. Sports Medicine. [online] doi:10.1007/s40279-022-01706-y.
  4. Kim, J. (2020). Pre-sleep casein protein ingestion: new paradigm in post-exercise recovery nutrition. Physical Activity and Nutrition, [online] 24(2), pp.6–10. doi:10.20463/pan.2020.0009.
  5. Eatright.org. (2020). Hydrate Right. [online] Available at: https://www.eatright.org/fitness/sports-and-performance/hydrate-right/hydrate-right
  6. Eatright.org. (2021). Vitamin and Mineral Needs of Athletes. [online] Available at: https://www.eatright.org/food/vitamins-and-supplements/types-of-vitamins-and-nutrients/vitamin-and-mineral-needs-of-athletes
  7. Salles, J., Guillet, C., Le Bacquer, O., Malnero-Fernandez, C., Giraudet, C., Patrac, V., Berry, A., Denis, P., Pouyet, C., Gueugneau, M., Boirie, Y., Jacobs, H. and Walrand, S. (2021). Pea Proteins Have Anabolic Effects Comparable to Milk Proteins on Whole Body Protein Retention and Muscle Protein Metabolism in Old Rats. Nutrients, [online] 13(12), p.4234. doi:10.3390/nu13124234.
  8. Usda.gov. (2022). FoodData Central. [online] Available at: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/175200/nutrients
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  11. Gong, E.S., Luo, S.J., Li, T., Liu, C.M., Zhang, G.W., Chen, J., Zeng, Z.C. and Liu, R.H. (2017). Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity of brown rice varieties. Food Chemistry, [online] 227, pp.432–443. doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.01.093.
  12. McMahon, N.F., Leveritt, M.D. and Pavey, T.G. (2016). The Effect of Dietary Nitrate Supplementation on Endurance Exercise Performance in Healthy Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Sports Medicine, [online] 47(4), pp.735–756. doi:10.1007/s40279-016-0617-7.
  13. www.heart.org. (2017). Monounsaturated Fat. [online] Available at: https://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/fats/monounsaturated-fats
  14. Usda.gov. (2022). FoodData Central. [online] Available at: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/171706/nutrients
Giovanna Rosario

Written by:

Giovanna Rosario, RD

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

She's currently working as a Registered Dietitian who enjoys promoting healthy lifestyles to be able to thrive in old age. She has worked dietitian-nutritionist in different settings helping adults manage chronic disease through dietary approaches, achieve healthful weight, and replenish nutrient deficiencies. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition and Dietetic Sciences, alongside a Master’s degree in Creative Writing.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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