11:23am Tuesday 22 August 2017

Research participants wanted – interpretation of helping behaviour

The title of the study is:

The Effects of Event Schema on Prosocial Behaviour in Australia and Malaysia: A cross-cultural interpretation of Helping Behaviour.

This project is being conducted by student researcher Fazliyaton (Liya) Ramley as part of her PhD at Victoria University under the supervision of Associate Professor Wally Karnilowicz and Dr Warwick Hosking from VU’s College of Arts.

About the study

This study explores the relations between event schema and prosocial behaviour in two different sociocultural contexts – Australia and Malaysia.

Event schema is the knowledge/scripts that you’ve got in your mind about what to expect to happen and how to behave in a variety of situations. This knowledge is stored in your memory based on your experience with that situation. This study will particularly capture your event schema in various help-seeking events where you see other in a dire need of help.

Specifically, this study will explore:

  • how individuals within the collectivist culture of Malaysia and the individualist culture of Australia experience help-seeking events
  • what helping means to them
  • the cognitive processes associated with choice when confronted by a help-seeking situation
  • how experience with such events impacts upon behaviour.

Participation in the study

Participation in the study is completely voluntary. 

You will be requested to:

  • fill in a demographic questionnaire
  • respond to Self-Construal Scale (Singelis, 1994)
  • be individually interviewed for approximately 60 minutes using unstructured in-depth conversational interview techniques. You’ll be presented with situational imageries of help-seeking events (in particular emergency situations) then asked for your opinion.

If you’d like to participate in the study or find out more, please contact Liya Fazliyaton:

Phone: +61 404 315 889
Email: fazliyaton.ramley@live.vu.edu.au


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