08:19pm Tuesday 12 December 2017

Mayo Researchers Find Mortality Rates from Liver Diseases Underestimated

The findings are being presented today at the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases 61st Annual Liver Meeting in Boston.

“The methodology that the CDC uses to define liver-related mortality is somewhat limited,” says W. Ray Kim, M.D., a gastroenterologist with Mayo Clinic. “They only look at a certain diagnostic code, and deaths due to other facets of liver disease are not included.

“There are a large number of people with hepatitis C in the U.S. They are getting older and experiencing complications. Also, associated with the ‘obesity epidemic,’ a large number of individuals have fatty liver disease. Some go on to develop end-stage liver disease, cirrhosis, or liver cancer. In order to discover the true impact of liver disease on the population, we analyzed mortality data using these more comprehensive criteria.”

The research team examined data from the CDC’s national death registry for deaths among adults during 1979–2006 and compared their results to statistics from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, a long-term, collaborative medical records project among health care providers in Olmsted County, Minn.

“We had a good correlation between the national statistics and the Olmsted County mortality data,” says Dr. Kim. “Of course, the most common cause of death for adults is cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, we found that liver disease is not far behind in terms of being No. 4 for people between the ages of 45 and 64 years.”

Dr. Kim says that obese people and those with hepatitis C need to be watched especially closely for liver disease as part of their overall medical management program. “Liver disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. — more than we have recognized in the past — and as physicians, we need to be aware of that,” he says.

Co-authors of the study include Sumeet Asrani, M.D.; Patrick Kamath, M.D.; Rachel Pedersen; Jennifer St. Sauver, Ph.D.; and Terry Therneau, Ph.D., all of Mayo Clinic; and Barbara Yawn, M.D., of Olmsted Medical Center in Rochester.

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About Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic is the first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice in the world. Doctors from every medical specialty work together to care for patients, joined by common systems and a philosophy of “the needs of the patient come first.” More than 3,700 physicians, scientists and researchers, and 50,100 allied health staff work at Mayo Clinic, which has campuses in Rochester, Minn; Jacksonville, Fla; and Scottsdale/Phoenix, Ariz.; and community-based providers in more than 70 locations in southern Minnesota., western Wisconsin and northeast Iowa. These locations treat more than half a million people each year. To obtain the latest news releases from Mayo Clinic, go to www.mayoclinic.org/news. For information about research and education, visit www.mayo.edu. MayoClinic.com (www.mayoclinic.com) is available as a resource for your health stories.


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