Top 10 Foods That Are Very High In Omega-3 Fatty Acids 2024

Sevginur Akdas

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

foods high in omega 3

Many people use fish oil and omega-3 supplements to get their daily omega-3 and polyunsaturated fatty acids or PUFA needs. There are also a lot of foods that are naturally high in omega-3 fats that you can easily add to your daily diet. 

The dietary recommended intake[1] of omega-3 fatty acids is 1.6 grams for men and 1.1 grams for women. This amount differs between 0.5 to 1.2 grams in children according to age and sex. Also, pregnancy and lactation periods of women increase their dietary omega-3 needs. A deficiency of this fatty acid can cause dermatitis, heart rhythm variability, the development of psychiatric disorders, and rough, scaley skin.

10 Best Foods High In Omega-3 Fatty Acids

  1. Flaxseed
  2. Chia seed
  3. Salmon
  4. Herring
  5. Canola oil
  6. Sardines
  7. Mackerel
  8. Soybean oil
  9. Trout
  10. Oysters

10 Best Omega-3 Rich Foods

Docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA, and alpha-linolenic acid are the main omega-3 fatty acids that occur in foods. Alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA, needs conversion in the body to EPA and DHA. The top 10 foods high in omega-3 per serving are listed below.

Flaxseed

foods high in omega 3

Plant foods and oils are first in the list of richest omega-3 foods.

Flaxseed is very popular among oilseeds with its effects on metabolism. It is an important source of[2] vegan omega-3 fatty acids besides soluble fiber and phenolic contents, which supports gut health.[3]

A serving of 100 grams of flaxseeds[4] includes 545 kilocalories with 18 grams of protein and 37.3 grams of fat. Among this fat content, 19.4 grams of it is omega-3 fatty acids. 

Yes, flaxseed and flaxseed oil are among the richest sources of omega-3 fatty acids, but indeed 100 grams of flaxseed is too much to consume at once. One tablespoon of flaxseeds (10 grams) contains nearly two grams of omega-3, which is the amount that one serving of salmon has. You can consume one tablespoon of flaxseed in your breakfast bowls or salads daily to achieve an adequate intake of omega-3 if you follow a plant-based diet. 

Flaxseed and flaxseed oil[5] have many health effects on digestion problems, such as constipation, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome. Researchers showed positive effects of flaxseed for metabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disorders,[6] diabetes,[7] and metabolic syndrome.[8]

Also, you can increase your satiety and control your appetite[9] by adding flaxseed to your diet.

Chia Seed

foods high in omega 3

Chia seed is the main topping of your oat bowls, and it is a superior way to consume such a nutritious food easily. It is also one of the foods high in omega-3 fatty acids.

One hundred grams of[10] chia seeds contain 486 kilocalories, 16.5 grams of proteins, and 30.7 grams of fat, which is similar to flaxseeds. It contains 17.8 grams of omega-3 fatty acids. 

You can consume one tablespoon of chia seeds (nearly 15 grams) which gives you 72.9 kilocalories with 2.67 grams of omega-3 fatty acids. 

Also, you can get 8.28 milligrams of selenium, 61 grams of potassium, 129 milligrams of phosphorus, and nearly 100 milligrams of calcium in just one tablespoon of chia seeds.

 In a recent meta-analysis,[11] chia seeds showed strong benefits on the serum lipid profile by decreasing total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. 

Salmon

foods high in omega 3

Fish is a special animal protein source and an excellent alternative to meat consumption in the diet. While general animal protein sources are higher in saturated fat, fish is lower in saturated fat and contains unsaturated fatty acids and omega-3. 

Salmon is a commonly consumed fatty fish with its delicious taste and nutritional content. A 100-gram serving of salmon[12] contains 188 kilocalories, 20.4 grams of protein, and 11.2 grams of fat. It includes 3.16 grams of mono-unsaturated and 3.12 grams of polyunsaturated fatty acids, which are essential fatty acids for the body. Among these polyunsaturated fatty acids, 1.91 grams are omega-3 fatty acids. 

This oily fish also contains 11 micrograms of vitamin D, 2.76 grams of vitamin E, 82.5 grams of choline, 25.8 micrograms of selenium, 264 milligrams of potassium, and 245 milligrams of phosphorus.

Herring

foods high in omega 3

It is another omega-3-rich fish. Herring fish includes 158 kilocalories, 18 grams of protein, and 9.04 grams of fat with 1.626 grams of omega-3 fatty acids per 100 grams.[13] 

You also have 4.2 micrograms of vitamin D 13.7 micrograms of B12, 65 micrograms of choline, 36.5 micrograms of selenium, 327 milligrams of potassium, and 236 milligrams of phosphorus by consuming 100 grams of herring.

One serving of herring is nearly 150-180 grams, which includes nearly 2.4-2.9 grams of omega-3.

Canola Oil

foods high in omega 3

Canola oil is one of the plant oils with high omega-3 content. Canola oil[14] contains about 12% omega-3 fatty acids in alpha-linolenic acid form and about 65% oleic acids, which is a mono-unsaturated fatty acid.

One tablespoon of canola oil contains 1.8 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, which is a good amount as an omega-3 source.

A recent meta-analysis showed that dietary canola oil consumption[15] reduced total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (bad cholesterol) compared to other edible oils such as olive oil, sunflower oil, and saturated fats.

Sardines

foods high in omega 3

Although there are seasonal changes in the content of omega-3 and other nutrients, research shows that approximately 40% of the fatty acids[16] in sardines are omega-3. The omega-3 amount can range from 0.5 grams in winter to 2.1 grams in summer, according to the weather, but we can say sardines are a good source of omega-3. 

Mackerel

foods high in omega 3

The Atlantic mackerel[17] includes 2.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acid per 100 grams. It provides 205 kilocalories and 18.6 grams of protein, making mackerel a good protein and omega-3 fatty acid source.   

However, when we look at canned mackerel’s[18] omega-3 content, it provides nearly 1.5 grams of omega-3 fatty acids. The source of fish differs in nutrient content, but either way, it is obvious that mackerel is a good source of omega-3. 

Soybean Oil

foods high in omega 3

More than half of the fatty acids of soybean oil are polyunsaturated fatty acids.[19] It provides 6.62 grams of omega-3 in alpha-linolenic acid form per 100 grams of oil. One tablespoon of soybean oil (14 grams) includes 0.92 grams of omega-3 fatty acids.

A recent meta-analysis study[20] indicates that replacing saturated fats in the diet with soybean oil lowers blood cholesterol levels. Therefore soybean oil may positively affect overall health and coronary heart disease.  

Trout

foods high in omega 3

A serving of 100 grams of wild rainbow trout[21] has 0.693 grams of omega-3 fatty acids in total. It provides higher protein with 20.5 grams per 100 grams compared to other omega-3-rich fish. 

When the researchers examined the trout and salmon fillets of various brands collected from the markets, they detected a low level of contamination products[22] such as mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, dioxins, and furans. However, researchers stated that these concentrations are tolerable for average consumption. Another recent study[23] in 2022 also showed similar results that regular consumption of fish products has no risk for heavy metal intakes such as lead and cadmium.

Oysters

foods high in omega 3

Oyster is a seafood product in the shellfish group. It provides 0.489 grams of omega-3 fatty acids per 100 grams.[24]   

However, shellfish foods[25] are one of the most allergenic food groups in the world. Therefore, you need to be careful against allergic reactions, and you may prefer other omega-3 sources to get health benefits.

Health Benefits Of Omega-3

There are many health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, specialists suggest consuming omega-3-rich foods, omega-3-fortified foods, or supplement forms to avoid deficiencies.

Obesity And Weight Management

Omega-3 fatty acids[26] are a good choice to support weight loss.

Consumption of omega-3-rich foods helps to boost your metabolism[27] by increasing energy expenditure and oxidation of fatty acids, which leads to decreased body fat storage. 

It also suppresses fat and cholesterol synthesis in the liver. These functions of omega-3 help people with fatty liver or abdominal obesity. 

Therefore you can use fish oil or seed oils mentioned above for weight loss.

Diabetes

Insulin resistance[28] leads to high blood sugar, elevated blood fatty acid levels, high insulin levels, and pancreatic beta cell dysfunction. It is also related to obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. 

A study indicated that consuming omega-3 fatty acids in the diet increased insulin sensitivity[29] in older people after eight weeks. It also reduced C-reactive protein in the blood, which is an inflammatory marker. 

Cardiovascular Health

Cardiovascular diseases are highly related to dietary saturated fat intake, which is high in western diets and lifestyles. 

Shifting saturated fat consumption with unsaturated fatty acids is crucial for dietary treatments for cardiovascular disease. 

PUFA consumption improves heart health by reducing the risk of major cardiovascular diseases such as myocardial infarctions, stroke, vascular problems, high blood pressure, etc., according to a systematic review[30] of the literature.

Evidence showed that omega-3 intake, especially EPA, reduced the risk[31] of cardiovascular events.

Anti-Cancer Effects

Furthermore, eating fish and omega-3 fatty acid supplementation showed a 35% to 51% reduction in the risk of liver cancer.[32]

The anti-inflammatory effects of omega-3 fatty acids and their positive impact on cancer-related proteins may effectively prevent breast cancer[33] in individuals at high risk. 

Also, in individuals who have developed cancer already, the positive effects of omega-3 on the cardiovascular, bone, and nervous systems provide great support during chemotherapy, even in childhood cancers.[34]

Brain Health

One of the main targets of omega-3 fatty acids is the brain and neuron function.   

EPA and DHA are essential omega-3 fatty acids for cell membranes and interact with other cell membrane components, especially phospholipids.[35] This structure of the cell membrane is essential for membrane integrity and function. Therefore omega-3 consumption is crucial for brain cells and related health problems.

The deficiency in omega-3 fatty acid levels, especially in EPA and DHA, is associated with major depressive disorder[36] and Alzheimer’s disease.[37] Supplementation[38] of omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, has effective results in reducing symptoms of depression. 

Furthermore, researchers found that omega-3 fatty acids may affect telomere length.[39] Telomeres are the structure that protects the ends of the chromosomes that contain the deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA structure, and the shortening of their size is associated with aging. It has been stated that omega-3 fatty acids positively affect telomere lengths. With this effect, omega-3 can be an anti-aging elixir.  

The Bottom Line

Omega-3 fatty acids benefit in many different steps, from cellular functions to overall complex systems in our bodies. It protects cell integrity, reduces inflammation, supports cardiovascular and metabolic health, has an anti-aging effect, and lowers cancer risk. Due to these effects, we need to get enough omega-3 fatty acids daily through diet or supplementation. Vegetable oils, seeds, and oily fish rich in omega-3 help us get enough of this essential fatty acid.


+ 39 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

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Sevginur Akdas

Written by:

Sevginur Akdas, RD

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Sevginur Akdas is a researcher, medical writer, and clinical dietitian, who is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in metabolism, chronic diseases, and clinical nutrition fields. She has many scientific articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and book chapters on nutrition, chronic diseases, dietary supplements, maternal and child nutrition, molecular nutrition & functional foods topics as a part of a research team currently. Besides her academic background, she is also a professional health&medical writer since 2017.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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Trusted Source

Database From U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Governmental Authority
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Oxford Academic Journals

Oxford University Press

Trusted Source
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Taylor & Francis Online

Peer-reviewed Journals

Academic Publishing Division of Informa PLC
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WHO

Database from World Health Organization

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Journal of Neurology

Peer-reviewed Medical Journal

American Academy of Neurology Journal
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ScienceDirect

Bibliographic Database of Scientific and Medical Publications

Dutch publisher Elsevier
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Wiley Online Library

American Multinational Publishing Company

Trusted Source
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

U.S. National Public Health Agency

U.S Department of Health and Human Services
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Trusted Source

Database from U.S. National Library of Medicine

U.S. Federal Government
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U.S. Food & Drug Administration

Federal Agency

U.S Department of Health and Human Services
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PubMed Central

Database From National Institute Of Health

U.S National Library of Medicine
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