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NightNanny Reviews 2024: Can It Help You & Your Little One?

Krista Bugden

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

All articles are produced independently. When you click our links for purchasing products, we earn an affiliate commission. Learn more about how we earn revenue by reading our advertise disclaimer.

nightnanny reviews
The NightNanny helps parents rest, knowing their baby is safe. Photo: Team Design

With many parents hiring night nannies to take the stress off their plates, Blessence™ has introduced a night nanny in technology form. Blessence™ is an Argentina technology company based in Buenos Aires passionate about helping parents. 

While their NightNanny product can’t fully replace the responsibilities of a night nurse, it can help reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, SIDS. So, what are the other benefits of this product? How can it help first-time parents?

Below, we explore NightNanny reviews, giving you insight into how this product might help the first few nights for first-time parents. We also uncover how this product can help you thwart the sleep deprivation stages and reduce stress without hiring a night nanny.

NightNanny

NightNanny

  • Real-time measurements. 
  • Avoids false alarms. 
  • No batteries are required.
  • Requires assembly.
  • Expensive. It’s still new technology.

NightNanny Reviews

Whereas a night nurse helps calm and soothe your child if they happen to wake up, the NightNanny doesn’t exactly do the same. It’s important to note that the NightNanny does not replace childcare or live night nannies by any means. 

For instance, parents or a maternity nurse are required for night feeds, no matter whether it’s the first night or the second night at home. Infants are not sleeping through the night and are eating about every two hours during the first few weeks at home.

However, like night nannies, it can raise the alarm when vital signs or those found aren’t normal. This can help your baby get the emergency care they need if something were to go awry in the middle of the night. Monitoring for absent breathing can be an early indicator of the need for emergency treatment for your infant, who may develop SIDS if not reached in time.

So, let’s look closer at the NightNanny product, including quality, supportive research, reputation, and price, and dig deeper into this NightNanny by Blessence review.

Quality

To help parents and babies sleep through the night, the NightNanny offers the first innovative technology with contactless monitoring. The corresponding app alerts parents if their baby’s vital signs change at any point during the night. In turn, this can prevent the fatal event of SIDS, which can be devastating for any parent.

It doesn’t matter whether this is your first or second child; newborn safety concerns can worry new parents.

In many NightNanny by Blessence reviews, the focus is on the groundbreaking technology this product produces that no other device has. The device itself is made of sturdy metal. The sensing head is made of ABS injection molded material. It plugs into an outlet using 5 volts of energy with a maximum power consumption of 3 watts. 

Overall, it seems safe to use with next-to-no bad reviews. 

However, the one side of this product that may be worth some consideration is the use of technology. It’s not indicated how the device actually works or whether EMFs, electromagnetic fields, are used; research suggests using caution when it comes to EMFs and babies[1] or children.

Thus, this may be something to consider for parents when wondering if this overnight NightNanny product is right for their baby.

Support Research

Claimed Benefits
Alleviates stress of parentsModerate Evidence
Restarts baby’s vital signs through an acoustic signalNo Evidence
Promotes weight lossConcrete Evidence

Alleviates Parents’ Stress

While pregnancy, especially the first trimester, can be particularly stressful, when the time comes for parenting, it’s a whole other level of stress.

The first night, or even the first three nights, as parents can feel daunting and scary. It’s not only a new routine, but, as most parents know, the first few months leave most parents feeling exhausted and spread thin. 

While, inevitably, having round-the-clock monitoring of vital signs during the night can lower stress, there is little evidence yet of this product’s success or accuracy rate. This is because a new technology is just coming onto the market, and there has been no time for clinical trials. 

At the same time, research does indicate that sleep deprivation[2] can raise stress levels and vice versa. Regular sleep schedules are important for overall stress levels and cognitive functioning. Yet, many parents struggle with this and with frequent wake-ups during the night.

The NightNanny doesn’t account for mum having to wake up to their baby crying, which still could significantly increase stress. Yet, it does account for frequent wake-ups due to 

concerns about their baby’s vital signs and SIDS. Worrying excessively can lead to insomnia[3] in an already exhausted new mother.

Thus, this claim is somewhat true, but it fails to cover the broad range of reasons why parents are stressed[4] in the first place. This means it may help incrementally, but it won’t fully eliminate the stress associated with childcare.

Restarts Baby’s Vital Signs Through Acoustic Signal

NightNanny claims to serve two main purposes. First, it alerts parents when no vital signs are detected. Second, it may restart the baby’s vital signs through the acoustic trigger.

Acoustic signals[5] are frequently used to monitor vital signs, and the evidence supports this use. Yet, no evidence was found that these signals could potentially restart breathing or heart rate, meaning this could be an empty claim.

Monitors Baby’s Vital Signs

As explored above, acoustic signals[5] have been extensively used for monitoring breathing and heart rate. This isn’t entirely new technology and has been used in medical care settings for years. Thus, it makes sense that this device could easily and accurately monitor your baby’s vital signs during the night and alert parents if none are detected.

NightNanny Reputation

NightNanny doesn’t have a huge reputation online, with not many people knowing about the brand. It’s also lacking some transparency in terms of how the product actually works. 

NightNanny Price

The price is a comparable to other contactless baby monitors. However, it may be slightly higher in cost than other popular options on the market. At the same time, this monitor is much more affordable than hiring a night nanny or maternity nurse.

The product is expected to roll out in April of 2024. Pledging support is the best way to get the first shipments of this innovative product. 

The price packages range from $385.00 to $471.00 and will be shipped only within the European union initially. Packages differ in whether there is a wall mount or not for the device. Pledge your support through the Kickstarter program at NightNanny[6] and get the first product on the market.

Nurse nannies may cost anywhere from $275-$600 for a 12-hour schedule. Finding live-in nannies is often cheaper than hiring someone to do night feeds. And it is far cheaper to buy NightNanny than pay for a live-in nanny despite the more limited functions.

Alternatives To NightNanny

Nanit

Nanit

See Nanit Review

  • Proven usage by many other parents worldwide.
  • Logs rollovers, breathing patterns, and more.
  • App monitors baby development milestones.
  • Set-up required.
  • Can be expensive.
Koala

Koala

See Koala Review

  • Alerts parents of any changes in vital signs.
  • Creates ambient audio for sleeping.
  • Easy-to-use app.
  • Attachment to baby’s foot, which may slip off.
  • Unclear pricing and how to purchase products.
Infant Optics

Infant Optics

See Infant Optics Review

  • Award-winning baby monitor.Non-wifi and hack-proof system.
  • More affordable than other options.
  • No mention of heart rate or breathing rate monitoring overnight.
  • May not prevent SIDS, specifically.

Health Benefits Of NightNanny

The major health benefit of the NightNanny is that it can prevent SIDS by alerting parents when no vital signs are detected during sleep. It can help keep your child safe by allowing you to get them to emergency care as soon as possible if any issues occur. Additionally, parents can rest easier and potentially better when less exhausted by stress and a lack of sleep.

Vital signs can be monitored even through blankets and clothing. And since it is contactless, movement won’t dislodge any sensors attached to the baby’s body. So, no amount of movement will interfere with transmitting vital signs to sleeping parents.

Neonatal deaths account for 44%[7] of all deaths in children under five years of age. Most of these deaths were deemed preventable by better care. SIDS is the third leading cause of infant death[8] in 2020, increasing by 15% from 2019, primarily in non-Hispanic Blacks.

While avoiding SIDS is an important concern, it’s important to note, however, that the first few weeks of parenting rarely consist of sleeping through the night. Babies require feedings and often don’t sleep entirely through the night until about six months of age. In other words, this device doesn’t fully replace a parent or nanny, who is required for night feeds or to help soothe crying episodes.

Potential Side Effects

There aren’t many side effects to note. Overall, it seems like a fairly safe product that most parents can afford and add to their existing routine. 

Yet, it’s not clear how this product works, meaning EMFs could be a potential safety consideration. However, it’s highly unlikely, given the evidence, that this product uses high amounts of EMFs.

How To Use NightNanny

The NightNanny is considered ultra-easy to set up. And once it’s set up, you don’t need to do this again. The app is also easy to use, alerting parents when vital signs aren’t detected. This can help parents and the entire family sleep better at night without the stress of SIDS. 

The easy-to-install arm hovers over top of the crib, detecting any critical changes that would warrant an alert.

Final Thought

In this NightNanny review, we broke down how this nighttime baby monitor works to prevent SIDS and may alleviate some stress for parents. With SIDS being one of the leading causes of death for newborns, this is one less thing that a new mum and pop has to worry about. In turn, your morning routine might feel more welcomed after a more peaceful night’s rest and knowing your child is being carefully watched.

Frequently Asked Questions

How does NightNanny’s vital-sensing technology work?

NightNanny uses acoustic signaling to monitor vital signs. If any changes are detected, the app sends an alert to parents through their linked phone device.

What are the tech specs of NightNanny?

The NightNanny includes an arm that goes over the crib for monitoring and an easy-to-use app.

What are the pros and cons of NightNanny?

The NightNanny pros include contactless measurement of vital signs in darkness and through the fabric and avoiding false alarms leading to exhausted parents. The cons include assembly required, and it may be more expensive than other options on the market.

Is NightNanny worth it?

This depends on you. If the price is worthwhile to know that your child is resting peacefully and you’ll be alerted if anything goes wrong, then this could be the right product for you. 


+ 8 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Moon, J.-H. (2020). Health effects of electromagnetic fields on children. Clinical and experimental pediatrics (Online), [online] 63(11), pp.422–428. doi:https://doi.org/10.3345/cep.2019.01494.
  2. Nollet, M., Wisden, W. and Franks, N.P. (2020). Sleep deprivation and stress: a reciprocal relationship. Interface Focus, [online] 10(3), pp.20190092–20190092. doi:https://doi.org/10.1098/rsfs.2019.0092.
  3. O’Kearney, R. and Pech, M. (2014). General and sleep-specific worry in insomnia. Sleep and Biological Rhythms, [online] 12(3), pp.212–215. doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/sbr.12054.
  4. Ayers, S., Crawley, R., Webb, R., Button, S. and Thornton, A. (2019). What are women stressed about after birth? Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care, [online] 46(4), pp.678–685. doi:https://doi.org/10.1111/birt.12455.
  5. Mallegni, N., Molinari, G., Ricci, C., Lazzeri, A., Davide La Rosa, Crivello, A. and Milazzo, M. (2022). Sensing Devices for Detecting and Processing Acoustic Signals in Healthcare. Biosensors, [online] 12(10), pp.835–835. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12100835.
  6. Kickstarter. (2023). NightNanny by BlessenceTM. [online] Available at: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1628881826/nightnanny-by-blessencetm/description
  7. Oza, S., Lawn, J.E., Hogan, D.R., Mathers, C. and Cousens, S.N. (2014). Neonatal cause-of-death estimates for the early and late neonatal periods for 194 countries: 2000–2013. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 93(1), pp.19–28. doi:https://doi.org/10.2471/blt.14.139790.
  8. American Academy of Pediatrics. (1753). Pediatrics. [online] Available at: https://publications.aap.org/pediatrics/?autologincheck=redirected
Krista Bugden

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Krista Bugden worked as a Kinesiologist at a physiotherapist clinic in Ottawa, Canada for over five years. She has an Honours Bachelor Degree in Human Kinetics (Human Movement) from the University of Ottawa and uses her extensive knowledge in this area to educate others through well-researched, scientific, and informative articles about exercise, nutrition, and more. Her passions include hiking, traveling, and weightlifting.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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