10:54am Tuesday 19 June 2018

Preeclampsia Screening Method Found Superior to Current Tests

New research highlights a more accurate way to screen for preeclampsia in pregnant women than currently recommended methods. Published early online in Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology, the study challenges the UK’s current guidelines on the management of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy.

Preeclampsia (PE) affects approximately 2% to 3% of pregnancies and can have serious health effects for both the mother and child. The condition is characterized by high blood pressure. Some affected women develop very severe disease associated with kidney, liver, bleeding and neurological problems. The fetus may experience impaired growth and possibly die. Risks are especially high when PE leads to preterm birth before 37 weeks’ gestation (preterm-PE), which itself is associated with long-term health issues for the children.

Recent evidence suggests that giving low-dose aspirin to women at high risk of the disorder can reduce the prevalence of the severest form of preeclampsia by more than 60%, but the treatment must be started before 16 weeks’ gestation. Therefore, early detection is key. In the UK, identification of high-risk women who could benefit from aspirin is based on a checklist of maternal characteristics and medical history as defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. An alternative approach combines known risk factors with the results of various maternal biophysical and biochemical measurements taken at 11 to 13 weeks’ gestation: mean arterial pressure (MAP), uterine artery pulsatility index (UtA-PI), and serum placental growth factor (PlGF); known as the first-trimester combined test.

This latest Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology study—called the Screening ProgRamme for prE-Eclampsia (SPREE) study—was designed to compare the performance of first-trimester screening for PE by this alternative approach with that of the current NICE method. The study was conducted in seven National Health Service (NHS) maternity hospitals in England between April and December 2016. Singleton pregnancies at 11 to 13 weeks’ gestation had recordings of maternal characteristics and medical history, as well as measurements of MAP, UtA-PI, and PlGF.

PE occurring at any point during pregnancy (all-PE) was found in 473 (2.8%) of the 16,747 pregnancies in the study, and preterm-PE was seen in 142 (0.8%). The detection rates of the NICE checklist for all-PE and preterm PE were 30.4% and 40.8%, respectively. Furthermore, compliance with the NICE recommendation that women at high risk for PE should be treated with aspirin from the first trimester was only 23%. If screening was carried out by the first-trimester combined test, the detection rates for all-PE and preterm PE were increased to 42.5% and 82.4%, respectively.

The findings indicate that the use of the simple algorithm based on maternal characteristics and easily measurable markers can identify approximately 80% of women who would go on to develop preterm-PE and would therefore benefit from taking prophylactic aspirin. The first-trimester combined test is freely available as a simple and user-friendly risk calculator via www.fetalmedicine.org and on the Fetal Medicine Foundation app.

“The SPREE study has provided definitive proof to support risk-based screening for preterm-PE using various biomarkers. It is now time to revise the professional guidelines and to move away from using a checklist-based method for screening.” said co-senior author Liona Poon, MD, of King’s College London, in London.

Basky Thilaganathan, MD, PhD, the journal’s Editor-in-Chief, noted that the findings have important clinical implications. “Poon and colleagues have demonstrated that effective early pregnancy screening for preeclampsia is possible in a routine NHS hospital setting. They make a compelling case for the routine implementation of this protocol to halve the cases of early-onset severe preeclampsia cases in the UK” he said.

 


 

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Full Citation

“Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of early screening for pre-eclampsia by NICE guidelines and a method combining maternal factors and biomarkers: results of SPREE.” Min Yi Tan, David Wright, Argyro Syngelaki, Ranjit Akolekar, Simona Cicero, Deepa Janga, Mandeep Singh, Elena Greco, Alan Wright, Kate Maclagan, Liona C Poon, and Kypros H Nicolaides. Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology; Published Online: 14 March 2018 (DOI: 10.1002/uog.19039).

 

URL Upon Publication

http://doi.wiley.come/10.1002/uog.19039

 

Author Contact:  King’s College London Public Relations department, at pr@kcl.ac.uk or 0207 848 3202.

 

About Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology

The Official Journal of the International Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISUOG), Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology (UOG) is an international, peer-reviewed journal publishing articles focused on, but not limited to, Maternal Fetal Medicine, Gynecology, and Ultrasound Techniques. Published monthly, UOG is read by Obstetricians, Gynecologists, Radiologists, Pediatricians, Sonographers, Midwives and Radiographers.

 

ISUOG is a charity and membership association with the mission of improving women’s health through the provision, advancement and dissemination of the highest quality education, standards and research information around ultrasound in obstetrics and gynecology. ISUOG has been in existence since 1991 and, with over 13000 members in 127 countries, is the leading international society representing professionals in ultrasound for obstetrics and gynecology.

 

About Wiley
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