07:56am Saturday 23 September 2017

ASIR Technique Reduces Radiation Dose Associated With Coronary CTA by 27 Percent

ASIR is a technique that allows radiologists to reduce the noise in an image and improve image quality (like adjusting a TV antenna to make a “fuzzy” image sharper) while reducing the radiation dose.

The large multicenter study included 574 patients undergoing coronary CTA at three imaging centers. Comparisons were performed between consecutive groups initially using the standard CTA method using filtered back projection (FBP) and subsequently ASIR with regard to patient and scan characteristics, radiation dose, and diagnostic study quality.

“There was a 44 percent reduction in the median radiation dose between the FBP and ASIR cohorts (4.1 mSv vs. 2.3 mSv),” said Jonathon Leipsic, MD, lead author of the study. “After adjustment for scan settings, ASIR was associated with a 27 percent reduction in radiation dose compared with FBP,” he said.

“Our study results show that ASIR permits reduction in tube current while imparting a statistically significant reduction in radiation dose due to the direct relationship between tube current and dose,” said Leipsic.

“ASIR represents a novel method of radiation dose reduction that appears additive to existing techniques,” he said.

This study appears in the September issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology. For a copy of the full study or to request an interview with Dr. Leipsic, please contact Heather Curry via email at hcurry@acr-arrs.org or at 703-390-9822.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895.

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