06:58am Friday 18 August 2017

Electronic stability control to cut rural road death

seminar brochure  [PDF]  (137.04K)

Jamie Mackenzie, PhD student with the University’s Centre for Automotive Safety Research, says the introduction next year of electronic stability control in all new models of cars should, over time, dramatically cut the number of fatal and serious injury crashes that occur on the state’s rural roads.

“Over half of the fatal crashes in South Australia occur on high-speed rural roads, and many of these are single vehicle crashes,” says Mr Mackenzie. “This is where electronic stability control is most effective with a reduction of around 60% in fatal crashes.”

Mr Mackenzie will explain how electronic stability control works in emergency driving situations and its effectiveness in saving lives in different types of crashes, at a free public seminar at 4pm at the Art Gallery of South Australia Auditorium on Wednesday 13 October.

He says serious accidents on rural roads are often caused by people losing control of their vehicles after going off the side of the road because of a loss of concentration, avoiding something on the road, or speed. When this happens electronic stability control kicks in to correct the steering and help prevent skidding.

Mr Mackenzie says about 50% of new passenger vehicles sold in South Australia currently have electronic stability control. Even with the new Australian design regulation, it will probably take around 10 years for the majority of cars to have it equipped.

Mr Mackenzie’s research involves simulations of real car crashes to see exactly how electronic stability control acts within the car under emergency situations. He will present some of these simulations at the seminar, explaining how electronic stability control may have prevented the crash.

WHAT: Centre for Automotive Safety Research public lecture: ‘Electronic Stability Control and High Speed Rural Road Crashes‘ presented by Jamie Mackenzie
WHERE: Art Gallery of South Australia Auditorium, North Terrace
WHEN: 4pm-5.30pm, Wednesday 13 October
COST: Free. Please book by email: leonie.witter@adelaide.edu.au or phone: (08) 8303 4114


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