10:27pm Saturday 16 December 2017

Vaccination statistics for 2010

 

Illustration photo: vaccination colourbox.comVaccination coverage for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR vaccine) is still high in all age groups. This is shown in the 2010 statistics from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. For the country as a whole, 93 per cent of 2-year-olds and 95 per cent of 16-year-olds have been immunised against these three diseases. Most 2-year-olds have also been vaccinated against pneumococcal infection since the vaccine was introduced in 2006.

Figures from the National Vaccination Register (SYSVAK) show that children in Norway are well vaccinated against diseases that are included in childhood immunisation programme. Vaccination coverage statistics for 2010 are published on the Norwegian Institute of Public Health’s website.

The childhood immunisation programme offers a range of vaccines. In addition to the MMR vaccine and the vaccine against pneumococcal infection, vaccination against Hib infection, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis are offered. 2010 statistics show that the coverage of these vaccines varies between 92 per cent and 95 per cent for the country as a whole.

The vaccine against pneumococcal infection was introduced in the childhood vaccination programme in 2006. In 2008, 86 per cent of 2-year-olds had received this vaccine. In 2010, the proportion had increased to 91 per cent.

Vaccination coverage is probably higher than figures indicate

Vaccinations are notified to SYSVAK. Using the registry data, vaccination coverage can be calculated to show the percentage of children in a cohort that is fully vaccinated, meaning that they have received all the recommended vaccine doses according to the childhood immunisation programme.

The real figures for vaccination coverage are probably somewhat higher for all age groups than the statistics show. This is mainly due to technical problems with the electronic transfer of immunisation notification from the municipalities to SYSVAK. Other reasons include the registration of children without the full personal identity number and the lack of updating of immunisations when a child moves from one municipality to another.

 

 

Vaccinated against the disease

Age-group

Year

Diph-theria

Tetan-us

Whoop-ing cough

Hib-infection

Measles

Mumps

Rubella

Polio-myelitis

Pneumo-coccus-disease

Tuber-culosis

2-year olds

2009

94

94

94

95

93

93

93

94

91

2010

93

93

93

94

93

93

93

92

91

6-year olds

2009

93

93

93

95

95

95

93

2010

93

93

93

94

94

94

93

16-year olds

2009

92

92

94

94

94

93

91

2010

92

92

95

95

95

95

88

Table 1: Vaccination Coverage (per cent) for the whole country, 2009 and 2010 

Vaccination against tuberculosis

Since autumn 2009, BCG vaccination is no longer offered to all children in the child immunisation programme. The vaccine is now only offered to children in defined risk groups. 16-year olds who were included in the 2010 coverage statistics (born 1994) were the last cohort to be offered this vaccine in school. From 2011, vaccination coverage of BCG vaccine will no longer be published as part of the annual coverage statistics.

BCG-vaksinasjon 2000-2010
Figure 1: Coverage statistics (per cent) for the BCG vaccine among 16-year olds 2000-2010.

HPV vaccine

Vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection for girls 12 years of age is included in the childhood immunisation programme. The vaccine was introduced in 2009. Vaccination coverage for HPV vaccination will be presented in separate statistics until the vaccinated cohorts reach 16 years. Coverage statistics for HPV are not discussed here. Hepatitis B vaccine offered to children in special risk groups is not discussed here.

Statistics at county and municipal level

Vaccination coverage is calculated at county and municipal level. The coverage indicates the percentage of children in a cohort (resident in the municipality as of 31.12.2010) that are fully vaccinated, that is, they have received all recommended vaccine doses by a given age according to the childhood immunisation programme.

In the local government tables, coverage lower than 85 per cent is marked in red, and the municipalities in question are expected to determine and address the causes.

In order to give municipalities a means to correct errors and deficiencies in the vaccination data, the NIPH sends out quality lists annually via SYSVAK. These are sent out before the coverage statistics are published and include children and young people under 17 years of age who lack vaccinations or have vaccinations that deviate from the immunisation programme in terms of doses and administration.


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