03:02pm Wednesday 20 September 2017

Men: Time for a tune up?

June is Men’s Health month. It’s a great time for a little “preventive maintenance” on yourself. At UTMB Health, we can help keep you running at peak performance.

Spend a few minutes below to pick up some helpful tips and information, view our men’s health checklist, and contact us with questions, for a follow-up or to schedule an appointment with the appropriate health care provider.

A significant number of men’s serious health problems can be detected and treated if awareness of these problems is more widespread. If you’re reluctant to visit your physician for regular screenings and routine care, remember that preventive health not only prolongs life, it also improves your quality of life. Investing in your health today is a very smart move for you and your loved ones.

Screening tests can find diseases early, when they’re easiest to treat. Talk to your doctor about which preventive medical tests you need to stay healthy.

Body Mass Index

Your body mass index, or BMI, is a measure of your body fat based on your height and weight. It is used to screen for obesity. The UTMB Center for Obesity and Metabolic Surgery offers an online BMI calculator, health tips and a full complement of medical and surgical approaches to moderating weight.

Blood Pressure

Have your blood pressure checked at least annually. High blood pressure increases your chance of getting heart or kidney disease, and places you at higher risk for stroke. If you have high blood pressure, you may need medication to control it. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

Cardiovascular Disease

Beginning at age 45 and through age 79, ask your doctor if you should take aspirin every day to help lower your risk of a heart attack. How much aspirin you should take depends on your age, your health and your lifestyle. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

Cholesterol

Once you turn 35 (or once you turn 20 if you have risk factors like diabetes, history of heart disease, tobacco use, high blood pressure or BMI of 30 or over), have your cholesterol checked regularly. High blood cholesterol is one of the major risk factors for heart disease. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

Colorectal Cancer

Beginning at age 50 and through age 75, get tested for colorectal cancer. You and your doctor can decide which test is best. How often you’ll have the test depends on which test you choose. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer, you may need to be tested before you turn 50. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

Other Cancers

Ask your doctor if you should be tested for prostate, lung, oral, skin or other cancers. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Talk to your doctor to see whether you should be tested for gonorrhea, syphilis, Chlamydia or other sexually transmitted diseases. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

HIV

Your doctor may recommend screening for HIV if you:

  • Have sex with men.
  • Have had unprotected sex with multiple partners.
  • Have used injected drugs.
  • Pay for sex or have sex partners who do.
  • Have past or current sex partners who are infected with HIV.
  • Are being treated for sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Had a blood transfusion between 1978 and 1985.

Depression

If you have felt “down” or hopeless during the past two weeks or you have had little interest in doing things you usually enjoy, talk to your doctor about depression. Depression is a treatable illness.

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

If you are between the ages of 65 and 75 and have smoked 100 or more cigarettes in your lifetime, ask your doctor to screen you for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. This is an abnormally large or swollen blood vessel in your stomach that can burst without warning. Your primary care physician can guide you; contact our Access Center if you need help finding a physician.

Diabetes

If your blood pressure is higher than 135/80, ask your doctor to test you for diabetes. Diabetes, or high blood sugar, can cause problems with your heart, eyes, feet, kidneys, nerves and other body parts. Call the Stark Diabetes Center at 409-772-0700.

Tobacco Use

If you smoke or use tobacco, talk to your doctor about quitting. For tips on how to quit, go to http://www.smokefree.gov or call the National Quitline at 1-800-QUITNOW.

Call for your “tune up” today at 409-772-2222 or 800-917-8906.


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