11:16am Wednesday 13 December 2017

Expanding the nursing profession

nursingCurrently Sean manages practical simulations with second and third year nursing students and will begin lecturing next year.

‘The nursing profession has expanded enormously over the past two decades. There is more autonomy in the role and work outside the traditional hospital environment, especially in more rural and remote communities,’ says Sean.

‘My experience in the military was different in that it included working in and out of tents, on ships, in helicopters and outside the traditional nursing environment.  I feel that this promotes an innovative and creative approach towards nursing practice.’

Sean hopes to instil his experiences with students and prepare future nurses for the reality of work which may well be outside the four sturdy walls that make up a hospital. Sean is hoping that students will be seen as leaders in the field.

‘Not only are nurses working in less conventional areas but it is often forgotten that doctors rely heavily on the nursing staff.  Nurses must be prepared to take on roles as clinical leaders in the workplace and to be forthright in advocating for patient welfare.’

‘Teaching nurses about their value to the healthcare industry as a whole equips them with the confidence to assert themselves in clinical decision making.  Nurses tend to be humanists and pragmatists and are ideally placed as the key practitioner at the centre of patient care.’ says Sean.

Running simulations in the Clinical Learning Unit on campus is an important part of building the fundamental skills set for a nurse in training. Sean is enjoying meeting current staff at the La Trobe Rural Health School and excited about commencing lectures next year.

‘Practical study is an important part of teaching and learning and the simulation facility is a great place for students to build confidence in a safe environment.’

‘It will also give our future nurses the ability to think quickly on their feet and to react swiftly in a dynamic environment. Ideally our students will graduate from the Rural Health School as not only effective junior clinicians but will also have an eye to the future as clinical leaders in rural nursing,’ says Sean.

For more information or to arrange an interview please contact:

Meghan Lodwick
La Trobe University Communications Officer
T:  03 9479 5353 M:  0418 495 941


Share on:
or:

MORE FROM Public Health and Safety

Health news