10:25am Thursday 23 March 2017

People with less education are living sicker, shorter lives than ever before

By Frances Dumenci

Americans without a high school diploma are living sicker, shorter lives than ever before, and the links between education and health matter more now than they have in the past, says a new policy brief and video released today by the Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

While overall life expectancy has increased throughout the industrialized world, Americans without a high school education are being left behind. In fact, life expectancy is now decreasing for whites with fewer than 12 years of education – especially white women. Additionally, lower rates of education tend to translate into much higher rates of disease and disability and place greater strains on mental health.

Overall, people with less education face a serious health disadvantage. They are:

·  Living shorter lives. In the United States, 25-year-olds without a high school diploma can expect to die nine years sooner than college graduates.
·  Living with greater illness. By 2011, the prevalence of diabetes had reached 15 percent for adults without a high school education, compared with 7 percent for college graduates.

The policy brief highlights research suggesting that education is important not only for saving lives, but also for saving dollars and creating economic productivity.

People with fewer years of education accrue higher medical costs and are less productive at work, which means that inadequate education is costing employers. The health benefits of a good education include greater access to health insurance, medical care and higher earnings to afford a healthier lifestyle and to reside in healthier homes and neighborhoods.

An animated video, also released today, helps illustrate these connections and explains the impact of decreased education on society.

“I don’t think most Americans know that children with less education are destined to live sicker and die sooner,” said Steven H. Woolf, M.D., director of the VCU Center on Society and Health. “It should concern parents, and it should concern policy leaders. In today’s knowledge economy, policymakers must remember that cutting ‘non-health’ programs like education will cost us more in the end by making Americans sicker, driving up health costs and weakening the competitiveness of our economy.”

Through the center’s new Education and Health Initiative (EHI), Woolf and his colleagues hope to sound the alarm and raise awareness about the important connections between education and health. With support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the EHI will be releasing three follow-up briefs demonstrating why an investment in education is an investment in health.

Read the entire policy brief here: http://societyhealth.vcu.edu/DownFile.ashx?fileid=1739

Watch the animated video here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8N4wka3wak&feature=youtu.be
About VCU and the VCU Medical Center

Virginia Commonwealth University is a major, urban public research university with national and international rankings in sponsored research. Located in downtown Richmond, VCU enrolls nearly 31,000 students in 223 degree and certificate programs in the arts, sciences and humanities. Sixty-eight of the programs are unique in Virginia, many of them crossing the disciplines of VCU’s 13 schools and one college. MCV Hospitals and the health sciences schools of Virginia Commonwealth University comprise the VCU Medical Center, one of the nation’s leading academic medical centers. For more, see www.vcu.edu.
About VCU’s Education and Health Initiative
The EHI was launched in September 2012 and is a program of the VCU Center on Society and Health, an academic research center that studies the health implications of social factors, such as education, income, neighborhood and community environmental conditions, and public policy. For more information, visit www.societyhealth.vcu.edu and follow the center on Twitter and Facebook.
About the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
For more than 40 years the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has focused on the most pressing health issues facing our country. They are committed to building a national culture of health that will enable all Americans to live longer, healthier lives now and for generations to come. For more information, visit www.rwjf.org. Follow the Foundation on Twitter at www.rwjf.org/twitter or on Facebook at www.rwjf.org/facebook.
 
University Public Affairs
804-828-7701
fdumenci@vcu.edu
By Tyler Weingart
Burness Communications
(301) 280-5732
TWeingart@burnesscommunications.com


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