12:41am Sunday 22 October 2017

Saving Lives With Cell Phones

PHILADELPHIA – Research shows that only one-third of people who have been trained in CPR will actually perform CPR in an emergency – the other two-thirds do nothing. Bystanders frequently state that they don’t act because they believe they don’t know how to perform CPR correctly, and some say they’re worried they will do more harm than good. New University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine research shows that CPR coaching through a cell phone audio recording is one way to help bystanders overcome their fears and save lives in real time.

“We know that it’s hard to remember the complex, sequential steps of CPR that people learn in a classroom setting — especially in an emergency situation with no warning,” says lead author Raina Merchant, MD, a Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania emergency physician and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar. “Our new findings show that even without training, anyone can save a life with the push of a button on their cell phone.”

In a study published online February 26 in Annals of Emergency Medicine, the Penn researchers found that the use of a simple audio recording accessible by both basic cell phones and the latest, most high-tech smart phones improved the quality of CPR performed and boosted rescuers’ confidence about their ability to perform the technique. The findings offer hope for buoying cardiac arrest survival, since early bystander CPR can double chances of survival from cardiac arrest. In most U.S. cities, more than 90 percent of arrest victims die, and for every minute without blood flow when the heart stops beating properly, odds for survival without brain damage plummet.

The authors evaluated the quality of CPR performed by people who are both trained and untrained in CPR, and both with and without a phone equipped with a CPR instruction aide. The findings showed that regardless of training history, participants using the audio recording on their phone performed significantly better CPR on a mannikin compared with participants without the phone. Those who listened to the cell phone recording performed 100 compressions per minute – the recommended rate – versus 44 per minute in the control group who had no audio help, and achieved compression depth of 41 millimeters, versus 31 millimeters (seven inches too shallow) in the control group. Ninety-seven percent of the cell phone group demonstrated correct hand placement, versus 75 percent of the control group, and 73 percent of the cell phone group reported feeling excellent or very good about their ability to perform CPR, more than double those in the control group (34 percent).

To read the Annals of Emergency Medicine press release on the study, visit http://www.acep.org/pressroom.aspx?id=47819.

 

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Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (founded in 1765 as the nation’s first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $3.6 billion enterprise. 

Penn’s School of Medicine is currently ranked #3 in U.S. News & World Report’s survey of research-oriented medical schools, and is consistently among the nation’s top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $367.2 million awarded in the 2008 fiscal year. 

Penn Medicine’s patient care facilities include:

Additional patient care facilities and services include Penn Medicine at Rittenhouse, a Philadelphia campus offering inpatient rehabilitation and outpatient care in many specialties; as well as a primary care provider network; a faculty practice plan; home care and hospice services; and several multispecialty outpatient facilities across the Philadelphia region.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2009, Penn Medicine provided $733.5 million to benefit our community.


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