12:31am Wednesday 18 October 2017

Nearly three times better rehabilitation with person-centred care

A study of patients with acute coronary syndrome has shown that a person-centred care approach emphasising the partnership between patients and health care professionals throughout the care chain improves general self-efficacy without causing worsening clinical events.

Background

There is growing evidence that patients, who are actively involved in their own care, receive effective treatments, self-management support and regular follow up in coordinated systems, report better outcomes and satisfaction with their care. Person-centred care (PCC) has been identified as a core component for sustainable, high quality health care.  

Purpose

To evaluate if PCC can improve self-efficacy and facilitate return to work or prior activity level in patients after an event of acute coronary syndrome.

Method

199 patients with acute coronary syndrome under 75 years of age were randomly assigned to a person-centred care intervention or treatment as usual and followed for six months. In the intervention group a person-centred care process was added to treatment as usual, emphasising the patient as a partner in care. Care was co-created in collaboration between patients, physicians, registered nurses and other health care professionals and documented in a health plan. Main outcome measure was a composite score of changes in general self-efficacy ≥ 5 units, return to work or prior activity level and re-hospitalisation or death.

Results

The composite score showed that more patients (22.3%, n=21) improved in the intervention group at 6 months compared to the control group (9.5%, n=10) (Odds ratio, 2.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.2-6.2; P=0.015). The effect was driven by improved self-efficacy ≥ 5 units in the intervention group. Overall general self-efficacy improved significantly more in the intervention group compared with the control group (P=0.026). Moreover, 48.3% (n=42) of the intervention group compared with 31.6% (n=31) of the control group improved more than 1.5 units (mean difference between groups) on the general self-efficacy scale (P=0.024). There was no difference between groups on re-hospitalisation or death, return to work or prior activity level.

 

Conclusion 

 

A person-centred care approach emphasising the partnership between patients and health care professionals throughout the care chain improves general self-efficacy without causing worsening clinical events.

The study has been published in the International Journal of Cardiology. The article is entitled Person-centred care after acute coronary syndrome, from hospital to primary care – a randomised controlled trial. Read the full article here.

 

For more information contact:
Andreas Fors, University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-centred Care -GPCC and Sahlgrenska Academy
Telephone: +46-(0)709-115931
E-mail: andreas.fors@gu.se
 

BY: Jeanette Tenggren Durkan


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