Severe Psoriasis Linked to Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events

Updated on - Written by

In a cohort study analyzing data from a general practice research database, Penn researchers reviewed the case histories of over 3,600 patients with severe psoriasis and 14,300 controls. Lead author Nehal N. Mehta, MD, MSCE, Director of Inflammatory Risk in Penn’s Preventive Cardiology program, and colleagues found that patients with severe psoriasis have a 53 percent increased incidence of MACE compared to the general population. They also found that having a diagnosed case of severe psoriasis confers an additional ten-year risk of 6 percent on MACE. The study results were reported at the 2011 American College of Cardiology meeting in New Orleans.

Previous work from Dr. Mehta and senior author Joel M. Gelfand, MD, MSCE, from the Department of Dermatology at Penn found that the risk of death from cardiovascular disease increased by 57 percent in patients with severe psoriasis. In addition, the relative risk of death from cardiovascular disease was even higher in younger patients, who were as young as age 40.

Dr. Mehta and colleagues conclude that this new estimate of increased ten-year MACE may warrant more aggressive strategies for treatment of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis.

 

###

Penn Medicine is one of the world’s leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (founded in 1765 as the nation’s first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4 billion enterprise. 

Penn’s School of Medicine is currently ranked #2 in U.S. News & World Report‘s survey of research-oriented medical schools and among the top 10 schools for primary care. The School is consistently among the nation’s top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $507.6 million awarded in the 2010 fiscal year. 

The University of Pennsylvania Health System’s patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania – recognized as one of the nation’s top 10 hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; and Pennsylvania Hospital – the nation’s first hospital, founded in 1751. Penn Medicine also includes additional patient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2010, Penn Medicine provided $788 million to benefit our community.


+ sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

Written by:

Healthcanal Staff

Medically reviewed by:

HealthCanal Editorial team is a team of high standard writers, who qualified the strict entrance test of Health Canal. The team involves in both topic researching and writting, which are under supervision and controlled by medical doctors of medical team.

PubMed Central

Database From National Institute Of Health

U.S National Library of Medicine
Go to source