06:33am Saturday 18 November 2017

Close Monitoring of Renal Tumors May Provide Alternative to Surgery

Although surgical excision of tumors remains the standard of care for renal tumors that have not yet spread (localized), the risk of complications in elderly or ill patients may outweigh the benefits of surgery. The study suggests that actively monitoring renal tumors in some patients may prove a safer option than immediate surgery.

The incidence of kidney cancer in the United States has been increasing for two decades, with the trend partly attributed to the introduction of abdominal imaging studies such as CT scans or MRIs in the 1980’s.  However, death rates due to renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer) have not decreased, indicating that surgery may be of little or no benefit to some patients.

“We are beginning to better understand the behavior of tumors that grow on the kidneys,” said Reza Mehrazin, MD, Assistant Professor, Urology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the study’s lead investigator. “In some patients, particularly those who are considered elderly or ‘high risk,’ we are now more likely able to delay surgery, sometimes indefinitely.”

In cases which are likely to result in surgery, it is important that urologists understand the natural history of renal tumors.  If surgery does prove necessary, minimally invasive surgery using robotic tools may be possible. For example, a robotic partial nephrectomy provides the surgeon with enhanced visualization and precision during the procedure, which translates to significantly less blood loss. Moreover, the incisions are smaller and result in less pain and shorter recovery time and hospital stay.

“Patients diagnosed with renal tumors have more options than ever before, said Dr. Mehrazin. “Surgery is not always the best solution. It is vital that patients consult with their urologists to explore all options and make the best treatment decision for that particular case.”

About the Mount Sinai Health System
The Mount Sinai Health System is an integrated health system committed to providing distinguished care, conducting transformative research, and advancing biomedical education. Structured around seven member hospital campuses and a single medical school, the Health System has an extensive ambulatory network and a range of inpatient and outpatient services—from community‐based facilities to tertiary and quaternary care.

The System includes approximately 6,600 primary and specialty care physicians, 12‐minority‐owned free‐standing ambulatory surgery centers, over 45 ambulatory practices throughout the five boroughs of New York City, Westchester, and Long Island, as well as 31 affiliated community health centers. Physicians are affiliated with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, which is ranked among the top 20 medical schools both in National Institutes of Health funding and by U.S. News & World Report.

 

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