10:19am Tuesday 12 December 2017

World's first soft-robotic surgery on a human body

Once inserted into the body through a small incision in the abdomen, known as a Trocar port, the new robot provides surgeons with unparalleled video feedback from inside the body, making it ideal for abdominal surgery.

Taking inspiration from soft-bodied animals, the team from the EU funded Stiffness controllable Flexible and Learnable manipulator for surgical operations (STIFF-FLOP) project have already made new ground creating robotic devices specifically for minimally invasive surgery (MIS), opening up areas previously inaccessible to surgeons using current keyhole surgery techniques.

Surgeons today rely on conventional surgical robots based on structures made from rigid components which only move in straight lines, consequently giving access to a limited number of sites.

Made from two segments of silicone material, the new surgical robot is equipped with three air chambers per segment allowing elongation and bending in all directions. It thus mimics an octopus’ ability to move its tentacles, enabling the robot to squeeze through narrow openings and past delicate organs without damaging them.

The improved dexterity and flexibility of the new robot and superior visual feedback allows surgeons to investigate and explore many more of the narrow tunnel-like structures within the body. The robot can also be fitted with surgical tools such as grippers or cutters to make it a fully functional surgical tool.

Professor Kaspar Althoefer, Professor of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at King’s and the lead researcher said: ‘We wanted to recreate the fascinating abilities of some animals such as the octopus which can instantaneously morph their tentacles from soft to stiff and back again, to give surgeons a safe way to navigate the human body, overcoming the difficulties they currently have with traditional tools and instruments. The results from our work with STIFF-FLOP show that this new robot is the answer and we look forward to taking soft robotics beyond surgical robotics into other areas such as repairing underwater pipelines or search and rescue operations.’

Professor Prokar Dasgupta, Chair of Robotic Surgery and Urological Innovation, MRC Centre for Transplantation, KCL and Chairman, King’s-Vattikuti Institute of Robotic Surgery said: ‘Soft robots have a great future in surgery and beyond. The STIFF-FLOP system allows greater flexibility, incorporation of images and returns the sense of touch (haptics) to the surgeon. It also learns from the surgeons’ movements to avoid dangerous structures nearby such as blood vessels, thus potentially making robotic surgery safer for patients.’

 

Notes to editors:

For further media information please contact Claire Gilby, PR Manager (Arts & Sciences), 0207 848 3092 or claire.gilby@kcl.ac.uk

The STIFF-FLOP project is a EU FP7 funded project and the team collaborated with the IMSaT at the University of Dundee to carry out the trials on human cadavers in the human cadaver lab.

The Centre for Robotics Research (CoRe) in the Informatics Department at King’s College London is developing technology for “soft robots”. The Department of Informatics in the Faculty of Natural & Mathematical Sciences was formed on 1 August 2010. The Department consists of the former Department of Computer Science, the Centre for Bioinformatics and the Robotics group, and Telecommunications group from the former Division of Engineering.


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