CBD For Skin Cancer 2020 – Possible Benefits, Treatment For Patient

Americans love to frequent the beach and tanning bed laying out and catching some sun rays. And while there is nothing wrong with that exposing your skin too much can lead to skin cancer.

CBD oil studies have shown that it can encourage abnormal cell death. It can also slow the growth and spread of cancer. The topical administration of CBD oil, without any THC, is a safe and effective non-invasive alternative for improving the quality of life in patients with some skin disorders, especially on skin cancer.

To combat that scientists and other researchers have begun to study how cannabis oil can be used to combat skin cancer. In this article, we provide the best CBD oil for skin cancer products that we found after doing our research.

Hopefully, this list will not only provide you with much-needed information about skin cancer and cannabis. But also make you think about purchasing one of the products that we have on our list of products.

CBD For Skin Cancer List (August. 2020)

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What is skin cancer

Skin cancer is an abnormal growth of skin cells. They are usually triggered by overexposure to the sun and other harmful rays. Once the mutations within your skin begin to mutate, they start to grow out of control. Then it turns into a cancerous mass that can spread throughout the body.

Skin cancer affects individuals of all skin tones, as well as those with darker complexions. Once melanoma occurs in people with dark skin tones, it’s more likely to happen in areas not usually exposed to the sun, such as the palms of the hands and soles of the feet.

There are three types of skin cancer and they are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. That is to say, out of all three melanoma is the most dangerous form of skin cancer. If you act promptly and with treatment, the other two forms of skin cancer basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma are not life-threatening.

The statistics are startling. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, the incidence of skin cancer is higher than all other cancers combined. In fact, it is believed that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer over the course of their life. Here is the breakdown of the estimated number of Americans who will be diagnosed in the United States in 2018: 178,560 new cases of melanoma, 87,290 noninvasive (in situ), and 91,270 invasives. 

In addition, the American Cancer Society projects invasive melanoma will be the fifth most common cancer for men (55,150 cases) and the sixth most common cancer for women (36,120 cases) this year.

The key factor in preventing skin cancer is to limit your exposure to sunlight. As well as use a protectant like sunscreen to cover your skin when you intend to spend a large amount of time outside or in a sunny area.

Types of Skin Cancer

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a kind of skin cancer that originates in the basal cells. Normal basal cells line the epidermis. They’re the skin cells that replenish old cells with new ones. Cancer of the basal cells results in tumors that arise on the skin’s surface. These tumors typically appear like sores, growths, bumps, scars, or red patches.

While BCC doesn’t really spread to other places in the body (metastasizes), still it can lead to disfigurement. In some cases, it can spread to different parts of the body. If it does, it can turn into life-threatening. BCC is the most usual kind of skin cancer. There are over 4 million cases diagnosed in the United States each year.

Almost all BCCs develop on parts of the body that are always exposed to the sun. Tumors can develop on the face, ears, shoulders, neck, scalp, and arms. In very rare cases, tumors develop in areas not often exposed to sunlight.

BCCs are generally painless. The only symptom is that the growth or change in the look of the skin. There are several kinds of BCC. Each has a different appearance:

  • Pigmented BCC: This kind appears like a brown, blue, or black lesion, which usually has a translucent and raised border.
  • Superficial BCC: This type takes on the look of a reddish patch on the skin that is often plain and scaly. It continues to grow and oftentimes features a raised edge. It typically takes on this appearance once on the back or chest.
  • Nonulcerative BCC: This sort appears as a bump on the skin that is white, skin-colored, or pink. It’s usually translucent, with blood vessels beneath that are visible. This is the most common kind of BCC. It most commonly arises on the neck, ears, and face. It can rupture, bleed, and scab over.
  • Morpheaform BCC: This can be the least common kind of BCC. It generally resembles a scarlike lesion with a white and waxy form and no defined border. This kind of carcinoma can indicate a very invasive form of BCC, which is more likely to be disfiguring.
  • Basosquamous BCC: This sort of carcinoma carries traits of each BCC and squamous cell carcinoma, a different type of skin cancer. It’s extraordinarily rare but is more probably to metastasize compared with other types of skin cancer.

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell cancer (SCC),  is a kind of skin cancer that originates in the squamous cells. Squamous cells are the skinny, flat cells that compose the epidermis or the outermost layer of the skin. SCC is caused by changes within the DNA of these cells, which leads them to multiply uncontrollably.

According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, SCC is the second well-known form of skin cancer. There are around 700,000 people in the United States that are diagnosed with this type of skin cancer each year.

People with SCC often develop scaly, red patches, open sores, or warts on their skin. These abnormal growths can develop anywhere, but they’re most often found in areas that receive the most exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, either from sunlight or from tanning beds or lamps. The condition usually isn’t life-threatening, but it can become dangerous if it goes untreated. When treatment isn’t received promptly, the growths can increase in size and spread to other parts of your body, causing serious complications.

Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare kind of skin cancer that regularly appears as a flesh-colored or bluish-red nodule, sometimes on your face, head, or neck. Merkel cell carcinoma is also known as neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin.

Merkel cell carcinoma most frequently develops in older folks. Long-term sun exposure or a weak immune system could increase your risk of developing Merkel cell carcinoma.

Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and can spread fast to other parts of your body. Treatment possibilities for Merkel cell carcinoma sometimes vary on whether cancer has spread beyond the skin.

The first sign of Merkel cell carcinoma is normally a fast-growing, painless nodule (tumor) on the skin. The nodule could be skin-colored or might appear in colors of red, blue, or purple. Most Merkel cell carcinomas spread on the face, head, or neck, but they can originate anywhere on the body, even on areas not exposed to sunlight.

Melanoma Skin Cancer

There are several factors that can make you more likely to develop melanoma, which includes:

  • Getting sunburned regularly, specifically, if the sunburn was severe enough to cause your skin to blister
  • Living in areas with excessive sunlight, like Florida, Hawaii, or Australia
  • Using tanning beds
  • Having fairer skin
  • The family has a history of melanoma
  • Having a large number of moles on your body

This type of skin cancer is less common. However, it’s the most dangerous sort of skin cancer. In fact, melanoma makes up only 1% of skin cancers, but it causes the majority of skin cancer-related deaths annually. Melanoma forms in the melanocytes, the skin cells that make pigment.

Actinic keratoses

As you age, you will begin to see rough, scaly spots spreading on your hands, arms, or face. These spots are known as actinic keratoses, however, they’re commonly called as sunspots or age spots.

Actinic keratosis usually develops in areas that have been damaged by years of sun exposure. They form once you have actinic keratosis (AK), which is a very usual skin condition.

AK happens once skin cells called keratinocytes begin to grow abnormally, forming scaly, discolored spots. The skin patches are often any of these colors: brown, tan, gray, pink.

They tend to appear on the parts of the body that get the most sun exposure, including the following:

  • Hands
  • Arms
  • Face
  • Scalp
  • Neck

Actinic keratoses aren’t cancerous themselves. However, they can progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), though the likelihood is low.

When they’re left untreated, up to 10 percent of actinic keratoses can progress to SCC. SCC is the second very known kind of skin cancer. Due to this risk, the spots should be regularly monitored by your doctor or dermatologist. Here are some pictures of SCC and what changes to look out for.

How is skin cancer usually treated

Once your doctor identifies skin cancer or an area of your skin that may show signs of precancerous masses then they will want to begin treatment. Usually what will be done first is to remove the skin masses that are presenting itself as the problem.

If you’ve been diagnosed with skin cancer, you’re likely facing decisions that can be overwhelming or hard to understand. Be sure to speak with your medical team in detail about your diagnosis and treatment options, and ask for clarification on anything you are uncertain about.

To help you navigate this complex landscape, our skin cancer treatment pages provide physician-reviewed information about your options. Because the types of treatments vary widely and are specific to the type of condition you have, review the treatment page that matches your diagnosis:

Actinic Keratosis Treatment

Your treatment options depend on how many lesions you have, where they are, your age, and overall health. Options include:

  • Surgical procedures
  • Topical treatments
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Combination therapy

Basal Cell Carcinoma Treatment

If you’ve been diagnosed with a small or early BCC, a number of effective treatments can usually be performed on an outpatient basis, using a local anesthetic with minimal pain. Afterward, most wounds can heal naturally, leaving minimal scarring.

Options include:

  • Curettage and electrodesiccation (electrosurgery)
  • Mohs surgery
  • Excisional surgery
  • Radiation therapy
  • Photodynamic therapy
  • Cryosurgery
  • Laser surgery
  • Topical medications
  • Oral medications for advanced BCC

Melanoma Treatment

If you’ve been diagnosed, your treatment choices depend on the stage of the disease, the location of the tumor, and your overall health. Options include:

  • Surgical removal of the melanoma
  • Immunotherapy
  • Targeted therapy
  • Chemotherapy
  • Radiation

Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment

While treatment options for MCC depend on the stage of the disease and the overall health of the patient, treatment includes surgical removal of the primary tumor along with:

  • Radiation
  • Immunotherapy
  • Chemotherapy

Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treatment

If you are diagnosed with an SCC that is not yet severe, there are several effective treatments that can typically be done on an outpatient basis. The options available to you varies on the tumor type, size, location, and depth, as well as your age and overall health.

Options include:

  • Excisional surgery
  • Mohs surgery
  • Cryosurgery
  • Curettage and electrodesiccation (electrosurgery)
  • Laser surgery
  • Radiation
  • Photodynamic therapy (PDT)
  • Topical medications

Ask your dermatologist to clearly explain the options that might work best for you, including details about the risks and benefits.

Best Methods of Marijuana Treatment for Skin Cancer

Cannabis Oil

CBD oil has been claimed as being beneficial in helping with chronic pain, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, anxiety and depression, schizophrenia, and skin cancer. CBD oil studies have shown that it can encourage abnormal cell death. It can also slow the growth and spread of cancer. 

Transdermal Patch

A transdermal patch is a patch that is attached to your skin and contains the medication. The drug from the patch is received by your body for a period of time. If you’d rather not have a pill or an injection, this may be a better option for getting some medications.

Some of the drugs more usually used in these patches include:

Smoking

How CBD oil affects our endocannabinoid system? When you consume CBD by smoking (or consume it in any other way), it can have profound effects on your body and mind. This is in large part due to its interaction with the endocannabinoid system (ECS). We say ‘in part’ because CBD also influences other biological systems, but we’ll get to that in a moment.

The ECS is a network of receptors that are located throughout the body and which interact with chemicals called endocannabinoids. When endocannabinoids bind with cannabinoid receptors, they trigger several different processes, which help the body to maintain homeostasis or a state of internal balance.

Edibles

CBD edibles have several benefits than other types of products:

  • Provide long-lasting relief: Edibles are broken down slowly in the digestive system. As such, the CBD is released gradually over a more extended period of time. You get to experience the effects for longer.
  • CBD edibles are easy to make: If you don’t want to invest in gummies online, you can quite easily create your own CBD edibles using a tincture or isolated powder. There are plenty of recipes online to try out!
  • Easy to dose: Instead of trying to measure out CBD using an oil dropper, edibles provide a pre-measured dose.
  • General remedy: Just like other forms of CBD (like capsules and tinctures), edibles provide whole-body effects. Plus, this form is tastier!

Topicals

Topical lotions and salves with CBD oil are common among those who suffer joint pain, including the nagging discomforts from previous injuries. Topicals are used directly to the skin, and typically provide immediate pain relief to the affected areas.

Many topicals are also infused with nutrients and natural ingredients that offer good moisturization for dry and/or damaged skin. CBD topicals typically come in tubs containing one to four ounces of lotion or salve. 

Vaporizing

CBD created for vaping is typically referred to as “CBD vape oil”. However, it doesn’t contain any actual oil. A better name for it is CBD vape juice or CBD distillate. They’re all made with food-grade ingredients, so they can also be consumed orally, but are very different from oil-based tinctures.

Look carefully at the ingredients. If it contains anything other than PG, VG, CBD extract, terpenes, and cannabinoids, then it’s most likely unsuitable for inhalation. Don’t take the risk. It must have some information regarding vaping, vape juice, e-liquid or e-juice on the label and should not contain any actual oil.

Tinctures

A tincture is derived by soaking the cannabis plant in an alcohol and water solution, while to concoct CBD oil, plant extracts are infused in a carrier oil, like coconut, olive or hemp seed.

Tinctures are extremely concentrated, so it’s vital that you take them in small doses. Although you can’t be overdosed by using a tincture, it’s better to be sure to stay safe and restrict yourself. As a matter of fact, if you’re using a tincture for therapeutic purposes, a large dose isn’t even needed. Plus, tinctures generally come with droppers that make it easy to manage and control. 

Suppositories

Generally, cannabis suppositories are created by blending cannabis-infused oils in a carrier oil that hardens at low temperatures. Rectal administration of cannabis oil can stimulate the cannabinoid receptors found there, this could be helpful for local conditions such as hemorrhoids or acute inflammation. The rectum also carries a number of key veins that deliver blood to your body, but it doesn’t look that suppositories handle cannabinoid absorption into your bloodstream.

Side effects of cancer treatment

Cancer treatments and cancer can cause side effects. Side effects are problems that happen once treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Several of these Side effects are mentioned below:

  • Anemia and Appetite Loss
  • Bleeding and Bruising (Thrombocytopenia)
  • Constipation
  • Delirium
  • Diarrhea
  • Edema (Swelling)
  • Fatigue
  • Fertility Issues in Boys and Men
  • Fertility Issues in Girls and Women
  • Flu-Like Symptoms
  • Hair Loss (Alopecia)
  • Infection and Neutropenia
  • Lymphedema
  • Memory or Concentration Problems
  • Mouth and Throat Problems
  • Nausea and Vomiting
  • Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)
  • Immunotherapy and Organ-Related Inflammation
  • Pain
  • Sexual Health Issues in Men
  • Sexual Health Issues in Women
  • Skin and Nail Changes
  • Sleep Problems and Insomnia
  • Urinary and Bladder Problems

Keep in mind that side effects vary from person to person, even among people receiving the same type of cancer treatment.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can cannabis oil cure cancer?

No, that is an unfounded and unsupported statement.

What can cannabis oil do to help alleviate skin cancer symptoms?

CBD oil can help reduce skin inflammation as well as help nausea and vomiting that may be caused by chemotherapy treatments.

Is cbd oil legal?

Yes, it is legal as long as it contains less than 0.3% of thc within the cannabis product.

What’s the most important thing cancer patients should know about cannabis oil?

There is a lot more than needs to be studied about cannabis oil so patients should know to consult their physicians before using it.

Resources

About Keith Myers

Keith J. Myers is Editor in Chief of the Health Canal. He has overseen and directed the editorial growth and skill of this website since 2012. Before joining Health Canal, Keith was a writer and editor who covered topics in CBD, health, science, and wellness.