3 Best GABA Supplements To Enhance Your Sleep & Mood 2024

Kate Barrington

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Melissa Mitri, MS, RD

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Peak Performance Pharma GABA Capsules

Peak Performance Pharma GABA Capsules

  • Third-party tested.
  • Fast processing and shipping.
  • Made with a natural source of GABA.

BulkSupplements GABA

BulkSupplements GABA

  • Convenient powder form.
  • Vegan and free from additives. 
  • Third-party lab tested.
Thorne Research PharmaGABA

Thorne Research PharmaGABA

  • Natural source of GABA. 
  • Easy-to-take capsules.
  • Free from artificial additives.

Whether work is keeping you busy or other obligations are getting you down; stress has the potential to impact every aspect of your life negatively. In fact, chronic stress can actually lead to structural changes[1] in the brain, which affect everything from mood to memory. 

If you’re feeling the effects of stress, you’re not alone. But you are not doomed to deal with a reduced quality of life. There are plenty of things you can do to relieve stress. Many people find meditation relaxing, while others prefer to exercise for stress relief. Some people use natural remedies like CBD oil, essential oils, or kratom for sleep and relaxation. 

However, if you find that your typical stress-relieving efforts aren’t enough, it might be time to try supplements. The right supplement can help you feel more relaxed, which could lead to improvements in sleep and mood. 

Gamma-aminobutyric acid or GABA supplements are another great options to try. In this article, we’ll dive into what GABA is and what the research says and share a list of the three best GABA supplement options on the market to help you find the one that works best for you.

Best GABA Supplements On The Market In (July. 2024)

What Is GABA?

Gamma-aminobutyric acid is an amino acid,[2] a protein-building block, and a neurotransmitter (i.e., chemical messenger) found naturally in the brain. It reduces the ability of nerve cells to receive and send chemical messages and decreases the central nervous system or CNS activity. In other words, it has a calming effect on the brain.

Due to this calming effect, there are countless claims regarding using GABA supplements to lower stress. Reduced stress levels[3] may lead to improved sleep quality, balanced mood, and improved immunity, so GABA supplementation is sometimes recommended for individuals with insomnia and anxiety.

Scientific research[4] supporting the effectiveness of GABA supplements for the treatment of these conditions, however, is limited, and thus more studies are recommended.

3 Best GABA Supplements For Better Sleep & Mood In 2024

Peak Performance Pharma GABA Capsules

Third-party tested and backed by a 30-day money-back guarantee; these vegan GABA supplements are popular.

  • Third-party tested.
  • Fast processing and shipping.
  • Made with a natural source of GABA.
  • No international shipping.

Peak Performance was founded by Talor Zamir and is based in Las Vegas, Nevada. This company uses organic and whole food ingredients as much as possible, and all of its products are third-party tested for purity and safety. 

This GABA supplement is made with a natural form of GABA, which is designed to bind to GABA receptors in the brain, activating the parasympathetic nervous system. While sympathetic nervous system activity is associated with stress and increased heart rate — the natural fight or flight response — parasympathetic activity produces a calming effect.  

The formula is vegan, gluten-free, and free from genetically modified ingredients, preservatives, artificial colors, and dairy. Peak Performance products are manufactured in accordance with Current Good Manufacturing Practices or cGMP regulations. 

Peak Performance also participates in the Vitamin Angels program, where for every order, Peak Performance sends a 1-year supply of vitamins to a child at risk for malnutrition.

 BulkSupplements GABA

If you prefer to take supplements in beverage form, this GABA supplement powder may be a more appropriate choice for you. Bulk Supplements does, however, offer it in capsule form as well.

  • Convenient powder form.
  • Vegan and free from additives. 
  • Third-party lab tested.
  • Limited return policy.

Bulk Supplements is a supplier of over 500 nutritional supplements. The company is based in Henderson, Nevada, where its products are manufactured in FDA-registered National Science Foundation or NSF Certified facilities that follow cGMP standards. 

This GABA supplement contains 750 milligrams of gamma-aminobutyric acid per ⅓-teaspoon serving. The formula is free from added sugar, gluten, dairy, soy, and yeast. It is vegan-friendly and sold in bags ranging from 100 grams (3.5 ounces) to 5 kilograms (11 pounds. 

Third-party labs test all Bulk Supplements products before distribution. Customer service is available by phone, email, or live chat seven days a week from 7:30 am to 4:00 pm PST. Shipping is free on orders over $59 within the continental United States.

Thorne Research PharmaGABA

When it comes to natural ingredients, it’s hard to do better than these Thorne PharmaGABA supplements. They’re free from artificial additives, dairy, gluten, and soy.

  • Natural source of GABA.
  • Easy-to-take capsules.
  • Free from artificial additives.
  • No third-party lab testing.
  • More expensive than others on the list.

Thorne offers a wide range of dietary supplements and an assortment of tests that provide insights into various aspects of health. This company manufactures its products in Summerville, South Carolina, in cGMP and NSF-Certified facilities. 

This GABA supplement comes in capsule form and contains 100 milligrams of gamma-aminobutyric acid per capsule. The formula is packaged in cellulose capsules and is entirely free from gluten, dairy, soy, and artificial colors or flavors. 

Every Thorne product goes through four rounds of testing, starting with the raw materials and ending with the final product. While Thorne rigorously tests their products, the testing happens in-house rather than in third-party labs.

How Do GABA Supplements Work?

GABA is one of many nonessential amino acids – this simply means it is an amino acid your body produces naturally, so you don’t need to get it from your diet. Even so, GABA supplements are sometimes recommended for individuals with generalized anxiety disorder, insomnia, or chronic stress. 

This unique amino acid works as a neurotransmitter and a postbiotic in the body. As a neurotransmitter, it blocks certain signals between neurons, which can trigger a relaxation response in the human brain. A postbiotic is the leftover bioactive byproducts remaining after bacteria break down food, aiding digestion. 

Whether you’re looking for the best GABA supplement for anxiety or sleep, the type of GABA might matter. Neurons naturally produce GABA in the brain, but, like other natural chemicals such as melatonin, it can be synthesized in a lab in addition to being found in nature.

Synthetic GABA from a lab is made in a process that involves chemical substances like succinimide, piperylurethan, and potassium phthalimide. 

Natural GABA, on the other hand, is produced using the same process[5] used to make fermented foods like kimchi. Lactobacillus bacteria are fed to ensure they produce high levels of GABA, which is then extracted through filtration.

Do They Actually Work? 

While GABA supplements seem fairly popular, few studies document their effects. Some data brings into question the bioavailability of neurotransmitter supplements[6] like GABA, leaving experts to wonder whether GABA supplements can even pass through the blood-brain barrier to be absorbed and used in the body. 

The term blood-brain barrier[7] is used to describe the structures throughout the central nervous system, which closely regulates the movement of cells and nutrients between the blood and the central nervous system in the brain. 

Some research suggests that GABA obtained from fermented foods like kimchi or kefir may be more bioavailable than synthetic GABA supplements made in a lab. 

Eating these foods might be an even better way to boost GABA levels than taking supplements. Some research also suggests that magnesium increases GABA levels[8] in the brain, so consider taking magnesium glycinate or magnesium citrate supplements to support this process.

You might also achieve the desired effect by taking GABA along with other dietary supplements that promote relaxation. Valerian root (Valeriana officinalis), for example, has been shown to promote sleep,[9] and melatonin[10] supplements can improve sleep in people with sleep disorders.

Scientific Research

Though there are concerns about the bioavailability of GABA supplements, a few studies suggest health benefits in mental performance, nervous tension and anxiety, high blood pressure, and physical recovery. 

A small 2015 study showed that taking GABA supplements enhanced cognitive function,[11] particularly related to critical thinking. The study was retracted, however, in 2022 due to a safety concern review of GABA, where daily supplementation was associated with a moderate drop in blood pressure.[12] 

In 2019, a study of 21 healthy men found that adding GABA supplements in addition to a daily intake of 100 grams of whey protein increased[13] growth hormone levels, resulting in lean muscle mass development.

In regards to its role in anxiety, their class of drugs called GABA receptor agonists have an anxiolytic effect,[14] but research supporting the use of GABA specifically for anxiety is lacking.

There is, however, some support for using a GABA supplement as a sleep aid. A 2018 study revealed that supplementation with 300 milligrams of GABA extracted from unpolished rice germ improved sleep quality.[15] 

Research in this area is still limited, but another study published in 2019 showed that supplementation with GABA decreased sleep latency[2] and increased sleep duration, which was heightened by the addition of another amino acid called l-theanine.

What To Look For In A GABA Supplement

When shopping for supplements, it’s important to research to ensure you know what you’re buying. The best GABA supplements are manufactured in cGMP and NSF-Certified facilities and are rigorously tested for safety. Ideally, testing should be completed by a third-party lab. 

It’s wise to read customer reviews before making your choice as well, but remember that reviews posted on the manufacturer’s website may not paint a complete picture. Check out third-party review sites as well to find more unbiased reviews to cover all your bases. 

For the most part, GABA supplements have pretty simple ingredient lists, but it’s always a good idea to check l for any unnecessary or harmful ingredients, such as artificial flavors, colors, and preservatives.

If you have dietary restrictions, such as a vegan diet, check the allergen warning on the product label and be aware that some supplements come in gelatin capsules that aren’t vegan. 

Remember that the FDA doesn’t regulate dietary supplements as closely as prescription drugs. It’s your job as a consumer to protect yourself and to take any health claims made on manufacturer websites with a grain of salt.

Best Time To Take A GABA Supplement

If you’re looking for a relaxing effect to help you fall asleep faster, it may be best to take GABA supplements about 30 minutes before bed. However, this is simply a suggestion and is not yet proven in scientific studies on timing with GABA for sleep. 

The benefit of using GABA supplements is that you may receive calming effects without the risk of dependence or side effects of sleeping pills. For example, pharmaceutical sleep aids[16] such as Zolpidem comes with a risk of daytime sleepiness, while GABA supplements have not been seen to be habit-forming.

Capsules vs. Powder

Before purchasing GABA supplements, think about whether you prefer to take capsules or if you want to mix a powder supplement into a beverage. It’s generally easier to control the dosage when taking capsules, though you’ll need to shop around to find a product that contains the desired amount of GABA per serving. 

When using GABA powder, you can take it by mouth directly, but a high dose taken this way might increase the risk for side effects. You can also mix it into a beverage like water or tea. Adding the powder to chamomile tea might boost the relaxation benefits of the supplement.

Recommended Dose

When it comes to the best GABA dosage for sleep, there are no hard and fast recommendations. The best dose may depend on whether you’re using the supplements to relieve anxiety symptoms or to improve your sleep

While GABA supplements appear to be safe, mild side effects[12] are common. Many people experience a tingling sensation on their skin, slight shortness of breath, or a burning feeling in the throat — these symptoms tend to be mild and go away after a few minutes. 

These side effects are most common with high doses of GABA, between five and ten grams per day, and in doses up to 120 milligrams over a longer period, up to 12 weeks. 

Due to these inconsistent dosage recommendations across studies, more research is needed on the optimal GABA dose for safety and effectiveness.

Before taking GABA supplements, talk to your doctor. Your dosage requirements may vary depending on whether you have a GABA deficiency or naturally low GABA levels.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are GABA supplements safe?

Yes. GABA supplements are generally considered safe when used as directed. According to a safety investigation,[12] however, there is a mild risk of causing hypotension or low blood pressure.

How does GABA affect your body?

GABA is the counterpart to glutamate,[17] the brain’s neurotransmitter that speeds up brain excitement and activity. By blocking this neurotransmitter, GABA helps the brain slow down. This is why it is associated with a calm mood. GABA may also play a role in supporting mental focus.

Are there any risks of taking GABA?

Other than a mild risk for hypotension, potential side effects of taking GABA supplements include headache, drowsiness, and abdominal discomfort. Some people also experience skin tingling, shortness of breath, or a burning sensation in the throat.

How much GABA should I take per day?

Even if you take the best GABA supplements, dosing recommendations are hazy, but studies regarding the benefits of GABA for sleep mention doses between 100 and 300 milligrams[18] per day.


+ 18 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Yaribeygi, H., Panahi, Y., Sahraei, H., Johnston, T.P. and Sahebkar, A. (2017). The impact of stress on body function: A review. EXCLI journal, [online] 16, pp.1057–1072. doi:https://doi.org/10.17179/excli2017-480.
  2. Kim, S., Jo, K., Hong, K.-B., Han, S.H. and Suh, H.J. (2019). GABA and l-theanine mixture decreases sleep latency and improves NREM sleep. Pharmaceutical Biology, [online] 57(1), pp.64–72. doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/13880209.2018.1557698.
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  5. Cui, Y., Miao, K., Niyaphorn, S. and Qu, X. (2020). Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid from Lactic Acid Bacteria: A Systematic Review. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, [online] 21(3), p.995. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21030995.
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  9. Shinjyo, N., Waddell, G. and Green, J. (2020). Valerian Root in Treating Sleep Problems and Associated Disorders—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine, [online] 25, p.2515690X2096732. doi:https://doi.org/10.1177/2515690×20967323.
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  11. Steenbergen, L., Sellaro, R., Stock, A.-K., Beste, C. and Colzato, L.S. (2015). RETRACTED ARTICLE: γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration improves action selection processes: a randomised controlled trial. Scientific Reports, [online] 5(1). doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/srep12770.
  12. Oketch-Rabah, H.A., Madden, E.F., Roe, A.L. and Betz, J.M. (2021). United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Safety Review of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA). Nutrients, [online] 13(8), p.2742. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082742.
  13. Sakashita, M., Nakamura, U., Horie, N., Yokoyama, Y., Kim, M. and Fujita, S. (2019). Oral Supplementation Using Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid and Whey Protein Improves Whole Body Fat-Free Mass in Men After Resistance Training. Journal of Clinical Medicine Research, [online] 11(6), pp.428–434. doi:https://doi.org/10.14740/jocmr3817.
  14. Babaev, O., Piletti Chatain, C. and Krueger-Burg, D. (2018). Inhibition in the amygdala anxiety circuitry. Experimental & Molecular Medicine, [online] 50(4), pp.1–16. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/s12276-018-0063-8.
  15. Byun, J.-I., Shin, Y.Y., Chung, S.-E. and Shin, W.C. (2018). Safety and Efficacy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid from Fermented Rice Germ in Patients with Insomnia Symptoms: A Randomized, Double-Blind Trial. Journal of Clinical Neurology, [online] 14(3), p.291. doi:https://doi.org/10.3988/jcn.2018.14.3.291.
  16. Edinoff, A.N., Wu, N., Ghaffar, Y.T., Prejean, R., Gremillion, R., Cogburn, M., Chami, A.A., Kaye, A.M. and Kaye, A.D. (2021). Zolpidem: Efficacy and Side Effects for Insomnia. Health Psychology Research, [online] 9(1). doi:https://doi.org/10.52965/001c.24927.
  17. Zhou, Y. and Danbolt, N.C. (2014). Glutamate as a neurotransmitter in the healthy brain. Journal of Neural Transmission, [online] 121(8), pp.799–817. doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00702-014-1180-8.
  18. Hepsomali, P., Groeger, J.A., Nishihira, J. and Scholey, A. (2020). Effects of Oral Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) Administration on Stress and Sleep in Humans: A Systematic Review. Frontiers in Neuroscience, [online] 14. doi:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2020.00923.
Kate Barrington

Medically reviewed by:

Melissa Mitri

Kate Barrington holds a Bachelor’s degree in English and is the published author of several self-help books and nutrition guides. Also an avid dog lover and adoring owner of three cats, Kate’s love for animals has led her to a successful career as a freelance writer specializing in pet care and nutrition. Kate holds a certificate in fitness nutrition and enjoys writing about health and wellness trends — she also enjoys crafting original recipes. In addition to her work as a ghostwriter and author, Kate is also a blogger for a number of organic and natural food companies as well as a columnist for several pet magazines.

Medically reviewed by:

Melissa Mitri

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