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Can Stress Cause Diarrhea? Here’s The Answer From Experts In 2023

Mitchelle Morgan

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Chelsea Rae Bourgeois, MS, RDN, LD

can stress cause diarrhea
Acute or chronic stress can trigger stress-related diarrhea. Photo: Thanh Thanh

Stress is one of the most harrowing mental health issues affecting millions worldwide. The accompanying emotions can include sadness, anger, and worry.

Stress can also manifest physically in several ways. You may experience headaches, skin issues, appetite changes, weight loss, weight gain, and stomach issues like diarrhea and constipation.

The interplay between stress and the gastrointestinal system is complex and fascinating. Acute or chronic stress can trigger stress-related diarrhea, also known as nervous stomach or stress diarrhea. This often results in loose stools and stomach trouble. The two central systems acting during stress-induced diarrhea are the gut-brain axis[1] and the sympathetic nervous system.

In this article, we’ll look into the science behind stress-induced diarrhea and answer the question: can stress and anxiety cause diarrhea?

Can Stress Cause Diarrhea?

Yes, stress can cause diarrhea. The connection between the gut-brain axis and the sympathetic nervous system is crucial in this process. This link leads to digestive disturbances, including loose stools and abdominal pain.

Grasping the facts on this connection can empower you to manage stress-related diarrhea effectively and seek medical support.  Physical healthcare providers and mental health professionals can help.

The Link Between Stress And Diarrhea

can stress cause diarrhea
Stress and diarrhea have a complex link. Photo: Kmpzzz/Shutterstock

You may have been eating a healthy diet full of probiotics, vitamins, and supplements, but one episode of stress triggers diarrhea. How? Can anxiety and stress cause diarrhea? Furthermore, can stress cause vomiting and diarrhea?

The answer to both questions is yes!

Stress and diarrhea have a complex link, making it crucial for healthcare providers and mental health professionals to understand it fully. Vomiting may be another symptom; however, you may or may not experience it.

When you are stressed, the body’s response to this stimulus is driven by the sympathetic nervous system[2] and stress hormones.[3] The sympathetic nervous system is responsible for the body’s response to threats or danger. This response triggers several physical changes, including gut-brain axis activation. This intricate communication network between the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems can lead to digestive disturbances like stress-induced diarrhea.

Chronic stress, perceived threats, or stressful situations can trigger diarrhea episodes due to the enteric nervous system’s elevated stimulation. The enteric nervous system[4] is the nervous connection controlling gut functions.

Doctors can diagnose diarrhea from anxiety and stress if you are feeling chronically stressed. They will still carry out some physical exams to confirm.

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Why Does Diarrhea From Stress?

When you experience stress, the sympathetic nervous system activates the fight or flight response. The sympathetic system triggers this primal survival mechanism in response to perceived threats or dangers. This stimulus prepares your body to confront or flee from potential harm.

Some physical manifestations of this response include increased heart rate, heightened senses, and the release of stress hormones like cortisol.[5] The surge of stress hormones can disrupt the normal functioning of the digestive system, leading to stress poops,[6], particularly in those with IBS. 

How To Prevent Stress-Induced Diarrhea

How To Prevent Stress-Induced Diarrhea
Physical activity can help manage stress. Photo: ViDI Studio/Shutterstock

To regain optimum digestive health and prevent stress and anxiety diarrhea, try the following:

Exercise

Engage in relaxation techniques like yoga,[7] meditation,[8] deep breathing exercises, and mindfulness practices. These complementary practices can effectively calm the mind and reduce stress levels. Physical activity can help manage stress[9] and improve overall well-being. Some, like deep breathing, are also beneficial for blood pressure regulation.[10]

Healthy Lifestyle

To improve your mental and physical health, adopt a healthy lifestyle, including regular exercise, sufficient sleep, and a balanced diet. 

Socialize

To decrease stress levels, aim for a strong social connection with friends or family. Spending time with these people may allow you to navigate stressful events better. This occasional offloading may also help you keep your stress levels low.

Avoid Stress Triggers

It is best to recognize and address specific stress triggers for long-term results. Relying on strategic coping mechanisms for these triggers can minimize their impact on your mental and physical health.

Avoid Certain Food

You should also reduce your intake of certain foods that may exacerbate digestive issues during stress. Some foods notorious for this are high-fat, spicy, and fried foods.

Improve Eating Habits

Stress might cause appetite changes.[11] In times of stress, some people may overeat, while others do not eat at all. To counter this, practice eating slowly and mindfully, paying attention to hunger cues. Avoid overeating or missing meals during stressful times.

Drink Water

You should practice drinking plenty of water to maintain proper hydration. Since one of the diarrhea’s most prevalent side effects is dehydration,[12] staying hydrated counters excessive fluid loss. You may also use hydrating oral salt solutions unless otherwise directed by your doctor.

Eat Brain And Gut Healing Foods

Finally, for optimum gut health, include brain and gut-healing foods in plenty. Include brain-protective foods like fatty fish,[13] fruits, and leafy veggies.[14] For your gut microbiome, go for probiotic foods like yogurt and kimchi. 

You can significantly reduce stress-induced diarrhea by incorporating these preventive measures and prioritizing stress management. Remember that seeking guidance from a mental health professional can offer valuable support in managing stress and its influence on your digestive health.

Other Causes Of Diarrhea

Suppose your doctors have already ruled out stress as the cause of your nervous poops; here are other potential causes:

  • Dietary Factors: Eating specific foods, such as excessively spicy, greasy, or high-fat foods, can lead to diarrhea. Food intolerances or allergies[15] can also contribute to diarrhea.
  • Infections: Bacterial,[16] viral,[17] or parasitic[18] infections can irritate the GI tract, resulting in acute diarrhea. You can get these infections from many sources, including contaminated food or water.
  • Medications: Some medications, such as antibiotics, laxatives,[19] or antacids, can interfere with the digestive tract’s natural balance and cause diarrhea.
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders: Conditions like irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease,[20] or celiac disease[21] can lead to diarrhea. These conditions affect the small and large intestines in various ways, potentially leading to chronic diarrhea.
  • Traveler’s Diarrhea:[22] This type of diarrhea is common during travel, caused by consuming contaminated food or water in unfamiliar regions.
  • Underlying Medical Conditions: Other gut disorders might cause acute or chronic diarrhea. These may include thyroid disorders or diabetes.[23]

When dealing with chronic diarrhea, especially due to the above causes, it may be necessary to see a doctor to develop an individualized treatment plan. After doctors diagnose the specific cause, they can prescribe the best treatment regime for your needs.

When You Need To See A Doctor

can stress cause diarrhea
Medical evaluation is important. Photo: Kzenon/Shutterstock

Medical evaluation is important. Before you self-prescribe medication or use a digestive enzyme supplement to counter diarrhea, see a doctor first, especially if you notice any of the following symptoms:

  • Severe abdominal pain.
  • Chronic diarrhea lasting longer than two days.
  • Blood in stool.
  • Fever.
  • Dehydration.

Seeking medical attention will help to uncover the underlying cause and allow doctors to offer treatment accordingly. A doctor will also assess any lingering complications and offer guidance on dealing with stress and lifestyle changes. The aim is to improve mental and digestive health to eradicate stress-induced diarrhea.

Conclusion

So, can stress cause loose stools? Yes, stress can indeed cause irregular bowel movements or trigger watery stool. The link is a compelling aspect of the mind-body connection that cannot be ignored. These stress stool episodes significantly impact digestive health, causing malabsorption of nutrients and physical illness.

Knowing how this interaction occurs allows you to decipher your stress triggers and take proactive steps to prevent stress-related diarrhea. You may adopt stress reduction techniques, seek social support, maintain a balanced diet, and exercise regularly. The most important step is to seek medical attention for severe or persistent diarrhea.

Consulting both gut and mental health professionals offers the best care for this type of diarrhea. Remember, the ultimate solution is to live a healthy life, mentally and physically.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can anxiety cause diarrhea?

Yes, anxiety can trigger diarrhea due to the gut-brain connection. The stress response can disrupt digestive function, leading to loose stools.

How long does stress diarrhea last?

Stress-induced diarrhea typically lasts a few days, but the duration may vary based on individual stress levels and coping mechanisms.

Can stress cause constipation?

Stress can cause constipation by slowing the digestive process and affecting bowel movements.

What to eat when you have diarrhea?

When experiencing diarrhea, you should consume bland and easily digestible foods. Avoid greasy, fibrous, high-fat, and spicy foods in excess.


+ 24 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

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Mitchelle Morgan

Medically reviewed by:

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

Mitchelle Morgan is a health and wellness writer with over 10 years of experience. She holds a Master's in Communication. Her mission is to provide readers with information that helps them live a better lifestyle. All her work is backed by scientific evidence to ensure readers get valuable and actionable content.

Medically reviewed by:

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

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