Are Sweet Potatoes Low FODMAP? 2023 Updates

Lindsey Desoto

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Chelsea Rae Bourgeois, MS, RDN, LD

are sweet potatoes low fodmap
Sweet potatoes are relatively low in FODMAPs.

Sweet potatoes are a staple in many kitchens — and for a good reason. They’re incredibly versatile, chock-full of nutrients, and easy to find at local grocery stores. But are sweet potatoes low-FODMAP?

Yes! The good news is that sweet potatoes are relatively low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols — or FODMAPS. This means they can be enjoyed as part of a low-FODMAP diet. But moderation is key.

Here’s everything you need to know about sweet potatoes, including their nutrition profile, health benefits, and FODMAP content. We’ll also discuss healthy ways to incorporate sweet potatoes into your diet.

Are Sweet Potatoes Allowed On A FODMAP Diet?

Yes, moderate amounts of sweet potatoes are allowed on a low-FODMAP diet. But it’s important to limit your servings to less than half of a cup. Larger servings contain moderate amounts of mannitol, a polyol that may cause gastrointestinal upset in people with IBS.

Sweet Potatoes Nutritional Benefits

Sweet potatoes are considered to be one of the healthiest vegetables. One medium-sized sweet potato[1] provides around:

  • Calories: 103
  • Protein: 2.3 grams
  • Fat: 0.2 grams
  • Carbohydrates: 23.6 grams
  • Fiber: 3.8 grams, or 14% of the Daily Value
  • Vitamin A:  122% of the DV
  • Vitamin C: 25% of the DV
  • Vitamin B6: 19% of the DV
  • Potassium: 12% of the DV

In addition, orange-fleshed sweet potatoes are an excellent source of beta-carotene, a plant pigment with antioxidant properties.[2] Antioxidants are compounds that interact with and neutralize[3] harmful free radicals, preventing them from damaging cells in your body.

The beta-carotene in sweet potatoes is converted in the body to vitamin A,[4] which is important for healthy vision, immunity, and reproduction.

This root vegetable is an excellent source of vitamin C,[5] which has antioxidant properties. Vitamin C is needed for a strong immune system and collagen production. Collagen is a protein that plays a vital role in joint and skin health. 

Thanks to their high fiber[6] content, sweet potatoes may help support the following:

  • Blood sugar control.
  • Weight management.
  • Heart health.
  • Gut health.

Recommended FODMAP Serving Size Of Sweet Potatoes

According to Monash University, the creator of the low FODMAP diet, sweet potatoes are allowed on the diet. However, they should be consumed in moderation. High amounts may be problematic.

For example, a half-cup serving of cooked sweet potato is low in FODMAPs. Yet, serving sizes greater than ¾ of a cup exceed the recommended amount of the polyol or sugar alcohol, mannitol.[7]

What About Yams?

Yams have a drier and starchier texture, similar to regular potatoes, and are not as sweet as sweet potatoes. Yams are also lower in FODMAPs.[7] This means you can consume a larger serving of yams before digestive discomfort may occur.

Why Would Someone Follow A Low-FODMAP Diet?

FODMAPs[8] are fermentable sugars that are poorly absorbed in the gut. They’re found in various foods, including cereals, legumes, fruits, vegetables, milk products, and sweeteners.

High-FODMAP foods tend to produce gas. They may be particularly troublesome for people with an intestinal disorder called irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS.

People with IBS who consume high-FODMAP foods may experience[8] gastrointestinal symptoms. These include abdominal pain, gas, bloating, constipation, and/or diarrhea. There is evidence that a low-FODMAP meal plan may be an effective treatment[9] for those suffering from IBS. 

However, it should only be followed under the supervision of a registered dietitian or healthcare provider as it is restrictive. The diet can lead to nutrient deficiencies and unhealthy weight loss because it restricts many foods that should be included in a healthy diet. A healthcare provider may also recommend supplements for digestion, like probiotics, that may help with IBS.[10]

Low FODMAP Sweet Potatoes Dishes

Stick to the low-FODMAP serving size of one-half cup to avoid potential side effects.

Sweet potato recipes that contain large amounts of sweet potatoes are unlikely to be tolerated. Planning ahead can help you avoid side effects while maximizing the benefits of the vegetable.

Here are some tips to help you enjoy sweet potatoes while sticking to your low-FODMAP diet.

  • Make a sweet potato soup. Instead of using only sweet potatoes, combine them with white potatoes. Regular potatoes can be enjoyed on the low-FODMAP diet in larger amounts.
  • Make sweet potato tacos. This easy, low-FODMAP recipe combines lean ground beef with low-FODMAP seasonings like chili powder, oregano, cumin, and paprika. Serve on hard corn tortilla shells and top with diced sweet potato, lettuce, and shredded cheddar cheese. 
  • Make low-FODMAP mashed sweet potatoes. Combine baked sweet potatoes with a pinch of sea salt, cinnamon, and butter. Remember to control your serving size and aim for about a half-cup portion. Drizzle with maple syrup for added sweetness.
  • Make low-FODMAP sweet potato fries. Slice one sweet potato and two regular potatoes into long strips. Toss with olive oil, sea salt, and pepper. Bake at 450 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes or until crisp and tender.
  • Add sweet potato to your salad. Top your salad with roasted sweet potato cubes to boost fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Make sweet potato toast. Slice sweet potatoes and bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes or until tender. Top with scrambled eggs and spinach leaves.

You can also do a quick internet search to find other low-FODMAP recipes that include sweet potatoes.

The Bottom Line

FODMAPs are types of carbohydrates that can trigger gas, bloating, and bowel changes in some people with IBS. When consumed in moderation, sweet potatoes are a low-FODMAP food. They are well-tolerated in people who require a low-FODMAP diet. However, serving sizes should be limited to half of a cup.

Listening to your body and adjusting your intake based on your tolerance levels is essential. Minimize potential symptoms by watching your portions and combining sweet potatoes with lower fodmap foods, such as regular potatoes.

If you are following a low-FODMAP diet, it is essential to do so under the guidance of a registered dietitian or other qualified healthcare provider. They can help ensure your nutrient needs are met while you work to manage your condition.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are sweet potatoes OK for IBS?

Since sweet potatoes are low in FODMAPs, consuming them in moderation is unlikely to cause any symptoms in IBS patients. However, it’s important to stick with half-cup servings.

What kind of potatoes are low FODMAP?

Yellow-skinned, red-skinned white potatoes, and purple potatoes are very low in FODMAPs. Sweet potatoes are also reasonably low in FODMAPs when consumed in moderate amounts.

Do sweet potatoes cause bloating and gas?

Sweet potatoes are generally well-tolerated. However, consuming them in excess may lead to bloating and gas, especially in people with IBS. That’s because they contain moderate amounts of mannitol, a polyol.

How much potato can I eat on a low FODMAP diet?

Limit sweet potatoes to less than a half-cup serving. You can eat more regular potatoes as they are lower in FODMAPs. However, sticking with a standard serving size: one medium-baked potato[11] is still a good idea.


+ 11 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Usda.gov. (2023). FoodData Central. [online] Available at: https://fdc.nal.usda.gov/fdc-app.html#/food-details/168483/nutrients.
  2. Usda.gov. (2023). Getting More Uses Out of The Vitamin-Packed Sweetpotato : USDA ARS. [online] Available at: https://www.ars.usda.gov/oc/utm/getting-more-uses-out-of-the-vitamin-packed-sweetpotato/.
  3. National Cancer Institute. (2017). Antioxidants and Cancer Prevention. [online] Available at: https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/diet/antioxidants-fact-sheet#:~:text=1%2C%202).-,What%20are%20antioxidants%3F,uses%20to%20neutralize%20free%20radicals.
  4. Nih.gov. (2017). Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin A and Carotenoids. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/.
  5. Nih.gov. (2020). Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin C. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminC-HealthProfessional/.
  6. CDC (2022). Fiber: The Carb That Helps You Manage Diabetes . [online] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/library/features/role-of-fiber.html#.
  7. Nanayakkara, W.S., Skidmore, P.M.L., O’Brien, L.M., Wilkinson, T.J. and Gearry, R.B. (2016). Efficacy of the low FODMAP diet for treating irritable bowel syndrome: the evidence to date. [online] pp.131–131. doi:https://doi.org/10.2147/ceg.s86798.
  8. Bellini, M., Tonarelli, S., Nagy, A., Pancetti, A., Costa, F., Ricchiuti, A., Nicola de Bortoli, Mosca, M., Marchi, S. and Rossi, A. (2020). Low FODMAP Diet: Evidence, Doubts, and Hopes. [online] 12(1), pp.148–148. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12010148.
  9. Manning, L.P., Ching Fa Yao and Biesiekierski, J.R. (2020). Therapy of IBS: Is a Low FODMAP Diet the Answer? [online] 11. doi:https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00865.
  10. Kumar, L., Lakshmi Sree Pugalenthi, Ahmad, M., Reddy, S., Zineb Barkhane and Jalal Elmadi (2022). Probiotics in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review of Their Therapeutic Role. [online] doi:https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.24240.
  11. U.S Department of Agriculture (2020). Vegetables | MyPlate. [online] www.myplate.gov. Available at: https://www.myplate.gov/eat-healthy/vegetables.
Lindsey Desoto

Medically reviewed by:

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

Lindsey DeSoto is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based out of Coastal Mississippi. She earned her BSc in Nutrition Sciences from the University of Alabama. Lindsey has a passion for helping others live their healthiest life by translating the latest evidence-based research into easy-to-digest, approachable content.

Medically reviewed by:

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

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