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5 Best Collagen Gummies Skin & Hair Growth 2024

Lindsey Desoto

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

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Vitauthority Super Collagen Gummies

Vitauthority Super Collagen Gummies

  • Two types of collagen
  • Free shipping
  • 60-day money-back guarantee

Elm & Rye Collagen

Elm & Rye Collagen

  • Contains vitamin C and collagen
  • Discounts available for recurring orders
  • Single, 2-pack, and 4-pack are available

HUM Nutrition Hyaluronic Glow Gummies

HUM Glow Sweet Glow

  • Contains vitamins C, E, and hyaluronic acid
  • Formulated by registered dietitian nutritionists
  • Vegan-friendly

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, found in connective tissue, skin, cartilage, bone, and tendon. It plays a vital role in building and supporting many tissues throughout the body.

As we age, our bodies produce less collagen.[1] This can lead to a loss of skin elasticity, lines, wrinkles, and joint stiffness.

One way to boost your collagen intake is by taking a collagen supplement. Although the way you ingest collagen is ultimately a personal preference, many people find collagen gummies easier to consume and more convenient. However, all collagen gummies are not created equal. 

This article reviews the best collagen gummies on the market today, including potential benefits and risks. 

5 Best Collagen Gummies For Hair Growth & Youthful Skin On The Market In July. 2024

5 Best Collagen Gummies For Your Better Health In 2024

Vitauthority Super Collagen Gummies

Vitauthority Super Collagen Gummies contain types I and III hydrolyzed collagen to support skin health and have a delicious tropical flavor.

  • Two types of collagen
  • Free shipping
  • 60-day money-back guarantee
  • Hydrolyzed collagen peptides
  • Only contains 99 milligrams of collagen per serving
  • Each serving contains 5 grams of sugar

Vitauthority is a supplement company that produces affordable, high-quality hydrolyzed collagen peptides and superfood supplements.

Vitauthority Super Collagen Gummies are formulated using plant-based pectin instead of animal-based gelatin and contain types I and III hydrolyzed marine collagen. Type III collagen generally works alongside type I[2] to improve skin’s elasticity and health.

Each two-gummy serving contains 99 milligrams or 0.099 grams of collagen. This is relatively low, considering most studies[3] consider a daily dose between 2.5 grams and 15 grams safe and effective.

While the gummies have a delicious tropical flavor, each serving contains 5 grams of added sugar, which is significant. According to Vitauthority, consumers should consume at least one serving per day, which is two gummies. The added sugar can quickly add up if you are downing multiple servings per day to increase your collagen consumption. 

Vitauthority tests all products in-house for potency and contaminants, heavy metals, pesticides, and bacteria. However, it does not appear to be tested by a third party, which is preferred over in-house testing.

Each 50-serving bottle costs $19.99 and ships free. All products sold by Vitauthority also come with a 60-day money-back guarantee.

Elm & Rye Collagen

Elm & Rye Gummies contain simply 33 milligrams of collagen per gummy according to their label.

  • Discounts are available for recurring orders.
  • Single, 2-pack, and 4-pack are available.
  • The only ingredient is collagen.
  • Limited product information is available.
  • The full product label is not available on the company’s website.
  • Contains two grams of sugar per gummy.

Elm & Rye is a newer supplement brand that has soared in popularity over the past year. The company is on a mission to improve the lives of humanity by making high-quality supplements convenient and accessible.

Elm & Rye Collagen gummies contain 1,000 milligrams, or 1 gram of hydrolyzed collagen per serving, which is lower than the typical dose recommended by researchers. However, it also contains vitamin C,[4] considered a collagen builder, because it may help boost your body’s natural collagen production. 

Although lab results are publicly available online for most of their products, including their collagen tablets, they are not available for the company’s gummies. Despite multiple attempts at contacting the company via phone and email, it was impossible to get any additional information about the gummies.

One container costs $44.99. Discounts are available for recurring orders. The company does not specify how many gummies are in each container.

HUM Nutrition Hyaluronic Glow Gummies

HUM Hyaluronic Glow Gummies is a dietitian-formulated tangerine-flavored gummy that contains ingredients, such as vitamin C and hyaluronic acid, that may support more collagen production.

  • Vegan-friendly
  • Contains vitamins C, E, and hyaluronic acid
  • Formulated by registered dietitian nutritionists
  • Clean Label Project Certified
  • Does not contain collagen

HUM Nutrition is a subscription-based supplement company offering personalized recommendations based on your unique nutritional needs.

While HUM Hyaluronic Glow Gummies does not contain collagen, it is formulated by a team of registered dietitians and contains ingredients that stimulate collagen production and improve skin appearance. 

Hyaluronic Glow Gummies contain 100% of the recommended daily intake for vitamins C and E. They also have 120 milligrams of hyaluronic acid,[5] which can help moisturize skin and reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

Vitamin C[6] is known for its ability to stimulate collagen production and improve signs of skin aging. Studies[6] suggest that Vitamin C is particularly effective at reducing oxidative damage that can decrease skin’s natural glow when combined with vitamin E. 

Hyaluronic Glow Gummies come in tangerine-flavored vegan gummies and are free of artificial colorings and additives. Each two-gummy serving contains two grams of added sugar and is sweetened using tapioca syrup and evaporated cane juice.

All supplements sold by HUM Nutrition are third-party tested for purity, quality, and potency. They’re also Clean Label Project certified, which independently tests for harmful chemicals and environmental contaminants like plasticizers, pesticide residues, and heavy metals.

One 30-serving bottle costs $26.

Life Extension Gummy Science Youthful Collagen

Life Extension Gummy Science Youthful Collagen is formulated with a clinically studied dose of collagen and hyaluronic acid to support healthy skin.

  • Contains 2.5 grams of collagen per serving
  • Includes hyaluronic acid
  • Sugar-free
  • Contains sugar alcohols, which may cause gas and bloat in some
  • Sweetened with stevia extract

Life Extension is a well-known supplement company producing high-quality supplements for over 40 years.

Life Extension Gummy Science Youthful Collagen combines clinically studied doses of collagen peptides with skin-moisturizing hyaluronic acid to support healthy skin and reduce the appearance of wrinkles.

Each serving of four collagen gummy vitamins contains 40 calories, 4 grams of protein, 3 grams of fiber, 2.5 grams of collagen, and 120 milligrams of hyaluronic acid. One study[7] found that people who consumed 120 milligrams of oral hyaluronic acid per day for six weeks experienced significant improvements in skin condition by increasing moisture content.

While the gummies do not contain added sugar, each serving contains seven grams of sugar alcohol,[8] which tends to cause bloating, gas, and diarrhea in some individuals. The cherry-flavored gummies are also sweetened with stevia extract, which studies[9] may alter the composition of gut bacteria. However, additional studies must be done to determine if this alteration is harmful or beneficial.

According to their website, Life Extension’s finished products are consistently submitted to third-party testing organizations to confirm and document product purity and potency. However, lab reports are not publicly available at this time.

A 20-serving container costs $27.00.

Mary Ruth’s Vegan Collagen Boosting Gummies

Mary Ruth’s Collagen Boosting Gummies are vegan-friendly and contain ingredients such as l-lysine and vitamin C, which may help boost natural collagen production.

  • Includes clinically studied ingredients that may help boost collagen production
  • Low in calories
  • Third-party tested
  • Only contains 33% of the Daily Value for vitamins A and C per serving
  • Contains stevia

Mary Ruth’s Organics is a popular supplement company that produces wholesome vitamins and supplements made with high-quality ingredients.

Since Mary Ruth’s Collagen Boosting Gummies are vegan, they do not contain collagen. However, they are formulated with nutrients your body needs to support its own collagen production and help you achieve glowing skin.

In addition to vitamin C and l-lysine,[10] which can promote collagen production, it contains vitamin A,[11] which has anti-aging effects and may help treat skin conditions like acne.

Each watermelon-flavored gummy contains five calories and two grams of sugar alcohol. The recommended daily dose is one gummy, up to three times per day, with food.

A third party tests all products sold by Mary Ruth’s Organics for quality and safety. However, the results of third-party testing are not publicly available online.

A 90-serving container costs $36.95. If unsatisfied with your product, you can return it within 30 days of purchase for a store credit.

What Are Collagen Gummies?

Collagen gummies are supplements that contain collagen. However, some collagen gummies do not contain collagen. Instead, they are formulated with ingredients that may stimulate the body’s natural collagen production.

How Do Collagen Gummies Work?

Collagen gummies are intended to increase the amount of collagen in the body. A good quality collagen gummy will be formulated with easily digestible, broken-down forms of collagen, which are often referred to as hydrolyzed collagen or collagen peptides.

Once hydrolyzed collagen is consumed, it is absorbed through the small intestine[12] and into the bloodstream as free amino acids and peptides, where it is distributed throughout the dermis (middle layer of skin) for up to 14 days. In the dermis, it provides the skin with skin-rejuvenating amino acids necessary for the formation of collagen and elastin fibers. It also stimulates the production of new collagen, elastin, and hyaluronic acid.

Collagen gummies often contain different types of collagen. Each type has its unique benefits. For example, type I collagen is usually found in collagen gummies and is generally considered best for the skin. Gummies with type II collagen, on the other hand, might be the best collagen gummies for joints.

Benefits Of Collagen Gummies

So, what are collagen gummies good for? While they typically do not contain as much collagen as many collagen powder supplements, collagen gummies may help supplement and boost your body’s natural collagen production. 

Here are a few ways that taking a collagen supplement may benefit you.

May Improve Skin Health

The most well-known benefit of collagen supplements is their ability to improve skin health. Several studies have shown that supplements containing collagen may help slow signs of skin aging by reducing dryness and wrinkles.

For example, one review of 11 studies[13] that looked at individuals who consumed 2.5 grams-10 grams of collagen daily concluded that short and long-term use of collagen supplements might improve signs of skin aging and accelerate wound healing. Further studies are needed to determine optimal dosing.

May Prevent Bone Loss

Bones are primarily made of collagen, which gives them strength and structure. Similar to how collagen production in the body decreases with age, so does bone mass. This can lead to conditions like osteoporosis,[14] which places you at a greater risk of bone fractures.

Studies[15] suggest that hydrolyzed collagen supplements may support bone health by preventing bone breakdown that leads to osteoporosis. In particular, daily doses of 12 grams may lead to significant improvements in the symptoms of osteoporosis and osteoarthritis.

One study[16] found that post-menopausal women who consumed 5 grams of collagen daily for 12 months exhibited an increase in bone mineral density by up to 7% compared to those who did not consume collagen. 

May Improve Joint Health

Collagen supports joint health by contributing to mobility, flexibility, and range of motion. Studies[15] suggest collagen may help reduce joint pain and improve osteoarthritis symptoms, a degenerative joint disease.

Another review of studies[17] in individuals with osteoarthritis found that collagen effectively improves joint stiffness and other symptoms associated with the condition. 

May Improve Heart Health

Some researchers believe that collagen supplements may positively affect heart health. One 2022 review of studies[18] noted that collagen could significantly decrease fat mass and increase fat-free mass. It may also lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the “bad” cholesterol, and blood pressure. All of these factors are associated with better heart health.

Another six-month study[19] found that individuals who took 16 grams of collagen per day experienced a significant decrease in measures of artery stiffness, a risk factor for heart disease. Moreover, participants’ high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, also known as the “good cholesterol,” significantly increased from the beginning of the study.

Again, further studies on collagen for heart health are needed before formal conclusions can be made.

Risks Of Taking Collagen Gummies

Unless you’re allergic to their ingredients, collagen supplements, including collagen gummies, are generally considered safe,[20] with no significant side effects reported.

That said, many collagen gummies contain added sugar. The sticky sugar in collagen gummies can easily stick to your teeth, which may quickly lead to cavities if proper oral hygiene habits are not practiced.

Additionally, consuming too many collagen gummies with added sugar can quickly add up. According to the American Heart Association, men should limit their added sugar intake to 36 grams daily, and women should consume no more than 25 grams.

How We Choose The Best Collagen Gummies?

Here are a few things to remember when choosing the best collagen gummies for your skin.

Third-Party Testing

Dietary supplements, including collagen gummies, are not regulated by The Food and Drug Administration for safety and effectiveness before they are marketed. This makes third-party testing essential to verify a product’s purity and that its ingredients match the label claims.

Furthermore, it’s always best to buy dietary supplements from a transparent brand that publishes results from a third party online. However, keep in mind that third-party testers do not always test for all contaminants, so it is a good idea to carefully read the lab report to see what was tested for.

Ingredients

When purchasing collagen gummies, it’s always important to read the Supplement Facts label to see what is present in the product and if it is in adequate amounts.

Some collagen gummies are very low in collagen and would require multiple servings for you to ingest a meaningful amount of collagen.

If you are looking for a vegan collagen-boosting product, be sure it contains vitamin C, the key nutrient responsible for aiding collagen production within the body.

Added Sugar

Some manufacturers of gummy supplements tend to add too much sugar to increase the palatability of their products. However, you can find many lower-sugar collagen gummies that still taste great without contributing excess added sugar and calories.

How To Take Collagen Gummies?

Most brands recommend consuming between one and three gummies daily for the best results. When taking collagen gummies, always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations and only take the recommended dose unless otherwise suggested by your healthcare provider.

Final Thought

Collagen gummies offer a convenient, palatable way to supplement your body’s natural collagen production. When choosing the best collagen gummies for you, it’s important to carefully read the product label and check to ensure ingredients are present in effective amounts. It’s also essential to choose collagen gummies that are not extremely high in added sugar and are third-party tested.

Consult your healthcare provider before use if you have any existing medical conditions, are taking any other medications or dietary supplements, or are pregnant or planning to become pregnant. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I choose collagen gummies?

Look for collagen gummies that provide at least 2.5 grams of collagen per serving, are low in added sugars, and are third-party tested for purity and potency. If you follow a vegan lifestyle, be sure to choose vegan gummies that contain ingredients such as vitamin C, which can help boost internal collagen production.

When should I take collagen gummies?

Most collagen gummies can be taken at whatever time is most convenient for you, with or without food. It’s also important to get in a habit and consistently take them for the best results.

Do collagen gummies help hair growth?

Anecdotal reports suggest collagen supplements can help support hair health and promote growth. However, at this time, there is no solid scientific evidence that collagen directly boosts hair growth.

Are collagen gummies effective?

Depending on the brand, collagen gummies can be effective as long as enough collagen or collagen-supporting ingredients are present.


+ 20 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

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  2. Jiann Jiu Wu, Mary Ann Weis, Kim, L.S. and Eyre, D.R. (2010). Type III Collagen, a Fibril Network Modifier in Articular Cartilage. Journal of Biological Chemistry, [online] 285(24), pp.18537–18544. doi:https://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.m110.112904.
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  18. Jalili, Z., Jalili, F., Moradi, S., Bagheri, R., Seyedeh Parisa Moosavian, Fatemeh Naeini, Mohammadi, H., Seyed Mojtaba Ghoreishy, Wong, A., Nikolaj Travica, Ali, M. and Jalili, C. (2022). Effects of collagen peptide supplementation on cardiovascular markers: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised, placebo-controlled trials. British Journal of Nutrition, [online] 129(5), pp.779–794. doi:https://doi.org/10.1017/s0007114522001301.
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Lindsey Desoto

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Lindsey DeSoto is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist based out of Coastal Mississippi. She earned her BSc in Nutrition Sciences from the University of Alabama. Lindsey has a passion for helping others live their healthiest life by translating the latest evidence-based research into easy-to-digest, approachable content.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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Taylor & Francis Online

Peer-reviewed Journals

Academic Publishing Division of Informa PLC
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WHO

Database from World Health Organization

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Journal of Neurology

Peer-reviewed Medical Journal

American Academy of Neurology Journal
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ScienceDirect

Bibliographic Database of Scientific and Medical Publications

Dutch publisher Elsevier
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Wiley Online Library

American Multinational Publishing Company

Trusted Source
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

U.S. National Public Health Agency

U.S Department of Health and Human Services
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Trusted Source

Database from U.S. National Library of Medicine

U.S. Federal Government
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U.S. Food & Drug Administration

Federal Agency

U.S Department of Health and Human Services
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PubMed Central

Database From National Institute Of Health

U.S National Library of Medicine
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