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5 Best Keto-Friendly Protein Powders 2024: Top Brand Reviews

Mitchelle Morgan

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Kathy Shattler, MS, RDN

All articles are produced independently. When you click our links for purchasing products, we earn an affiliate commission. Learn more about how we earn revenue by reading our advertise disclaimer.

ALOHA Vegan Vanilla Protein Powder

ALOHA Vegan Vanilla Protein Powder

  • Plant-based formula.
  • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)-certified.
  • Genetically modified organism (GMO) and allergen-free.

Orgain Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder

Orgain Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder

  • Gluten-free.
  • Contains probiotics.
  • Supports weight loss

Sunwarrior classic protein powder

Sunwarrior Classic Protein Powder

  • Whole grain brown rice proteins.
  • Zero added sugars.
  • Low-carb keto powder.

People religiously follow dieting to get in better shape and lose weight. For this reason, there are a ton of diet applications (apps) available online to assist dieters with particular meals. The keto diet is one of many diets, and it has special keto diet apps.

Keto dieters’ meals are healthy fats and a low-carb diet with moderate proteins. The main purpose of this diet is to push the body into ketosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the body switches to using reserved fats as energy sources rather than carbohydrates carbs). The result is usually weight loss if you follow this diet to the letter.

Now, if you are fond of using a protein supplement, getting one that is keto-friendly might pose a challenge. So, here are five of the best keto-friendly protein powders you will find in retail.

Best Protein Powder For Keto In (February. 2024)

Best Keto Protein Powder In 2024

ALOHA Vegan Protein Powder

ALOHA keto protein shake powder makes amazing protein shakes to kickstart your day. One ALOHA vegan protein powder canister contains 15 servings jam-packed with natural ingredients.

  • This protein powder is USDA-certified.
  • It is devoid of most allergens.
  • It has no artificial sweeteners.
  • It is gluten-free and non-GMO.
  • There is a claim that the formula was altered.

This vegan powder is a mixed protein powder with an organic protein blend made of pea, brown rice, hemp, and pumpkin seed proteins.

Organic blue agave inulin,[1] organic coconut sugar, natural organic flavor, xanthan gum, organic cinnamon, MCT from organic coconut oil, organic monk fruit extract, and organic ground vanilla beans are also included in this keto protein shake powder.

This protein powder can be used in various ways, including smoothies with added fruits if desired.

When you purchase a canister from the company’s website, it costs $32.99.

For a delicious and nutritious extra kick, sweet treat, or meal replacement, combine 2 scoops with 12 oz of water, plant-based milk, or your preferred protein shake recipe.

You can find interesting keto protein shake recipes for weight loss on their website.

Orgain Organic Plant-Based Protein Powder

It is available in two flavors: chocolate and vanilla for a sweet tooth user. This protein powder is ideal for the entire family.

  • Its ingredients help with weight loss.
  • It can be used for making a variety of protein shakes and snacks.
  • It is gluten and GMO-free.
  • It has limited options in flavors for a sweet tooth.
  • It contains the artificial sweetener erythritol

About one pound of Orgain vanilla keto plant-based protein powder is included in a purchase. Every serving contains 10 grams of protein and 14 grams of super-high, organic plant-based fats.

Cocoa butter, coconut oil, and avocado oil[2] create an organic ketogenic fat combination.

It also contains a gut-friendly organic prebiotic fiber certified vegan, keto, kosher, and gluten-free.

Orgain also incorporates pea protein, organic rice bran extract, organic alkalized cocoa,  organic erythritol, natural flavors, and sea salt. They also have organic guar gum, organic stevia, xanthan gum, calcium, potassium, and iron in their formula. Erythritol is an artificial sweetener known to cause gastric distress and adversely affect the gut in terms of bloating and diarrhea.

Because of this protein powder’s low sugar and carb content, you may use it to make a low-carb protein shake or a snack of your choice.

This protein powder is also non-GMO-processed, dairy-free, lactose-free, low in net carbs, free of added sugar, and has a USDA organic certificate. It’s excellent for post- or pre-workout recovery, meal replacement, and smoothie boosting.

One tab goes for only $38.99 if you buy without a subscription.

Sunwarrior Classic Protein Powder

If you have diabetes or prefer low or zero-sugar diets, then this protein powder will fit right into your keto diet. It has a low glycemic index of 100 calories, 2g or fewer carbs, and zero added sugars.

  • It contains zero added sugars.
  • This protein powder is gluten-free and GMO-free.
  • The ingredients may support healthy muscle maintenance.
  • It is paleo, keto, and kosher-friendly.
  • There are claims that the original formula might have changed.

One canister costs $44.97 as a one-time purchase, and with a subscription, you only pay $35.98.

Classic Protein uses the strength of raw, whole-grain brown rice, comprising the entire rice grain with the endosperm and bran.

It contains 100 calories, 2 grams of carbohydrates, and 18 to 20 grams of protein per serving making it a relatively high-protein powder.

The makers purport that it is a pure and straightforward protein powder that helps to build muscle protein synthesis and speed up recovery thanks to its full amino acid profile.

Brown rice offers a complete and adequate protein to regenerate muscle growth and tissues. It is hypoallergenic, contains 2 grams of fiber, and is easy on the gastrointestinal tract. The natural fat-burning properties of brown rice may speed up metabolism and increase calorie expenditure. The whole grain used by Sunwarrior produces a silky-smooth flavor and texture.

You can buy the 15-serving, or 30-serving, or choose to have a 12-pack mailed to you. Natural, vanilla, and chocolate are the flavors that are offered.

Vega Sport Premium Protein Powder

Vega sport premium protein powder

20% Coupon: HC20

Because it is NSF Certified for Sport, Certified Vegan protein powder, Non-GMO Project Verified, and gluten-free, this protein powder is touted as being specifically developed for athletes.

  • It is non-GMO.
  • It has a National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) certification making it ideal for athletes.
  • It is vegan with only plant-based proteins.
  • Contains both iron and calcium
  • You pay to get fast shipping.
  • It is expensive.
  • High in sodium (410 milligrams (mg) per serving)

This protein supplement for ketosis contains 30 grams of plant-based protein powders together with 5 grams of glutamic acid[3]and 5 grams of BCAA.[4] Pea protein powder, organic sunflower seed,[5] and pumpkin seed proteins contain the 9 necessary amino acids to make a complete protein profile.

With components including tart cherries, 2 billion Colony Forming Units (CFU) probiotics[6] (Bacillus coagulans), and turmeric extract[7] to promote muscle building and assist recovery, the manufacturer claims that this protein drink powder significantly supports recovery post-workout. The formula also boasts the presence of bromelain for better digestion and black pepper extract to maximize absorption.

Vega Sports formula comes with 3 grams of net carbohydrates, lacks sugar substitutes, flavors, or dyes, has no dairy or lactose, no soy protein isolate, and lacks whey protein isolate. This keto protein powder is made for both men and women. 

Simply blend or mix water or your preferred beverage with it after working out to get a creamy taste. You can even add fruit to create a delightful, protein-rich smoothie. You can drink protein shakes after every workout.

Vanilla, mocha, chocolate, peanut butter, and cherry are the flavors that are offered. One tab costs $64.99.

Perfect Keto Collagen Peptides Protein Powder

Just as the brand name suggests, the Perfect Keto Collagen Protein Powder manufacturers claim that their brand is the best. It is made of grass-fed and natural ingredients that are keto, low-carb, dairy-free, and delicious to fit anyone’s taste buds.

  • It packs hydrolyzed collagen proteins, probiotics, and medium-chain triglycerides ( MCT) oils.
  • It is lactose-free, non-GMO, with no artificial sweeteners.
  • Ingredients may support skin, nails, hair, joints, and ligament health.
  • It is an expensive protein powder.

One tub retails at $43.99 when bought as a one-time purchase. But if you sign up for the subscription, you save up to 20%.

Unlike rival products, one scoop contains 5 grams(g) of natural MCT oil powder and 10g of collagen, supporting ketosis.

Each serving has only two net carbohydrates: Types I & III and grass-fed beef. With no additional sugar, the flavor is similar to a dessert.

The first ingredient on the list is grass-fed collagen,[8] which is highly bioavailable, indicating that your system can quickly and effectively absorb it and utilize it to strengthen hair, joints, nails, skin, nail ligaments, and other connective tissues.

MCT oil’s preferred elements are fatty acid in coconut oil that provides energy[9] significantly more quickly than most longer-chain fatty acids. MCTs promote mental focus,[10] and weight loss[11] through better digestion. It also lowers the risks of heart disease.

Prebiotic acacia fiber[12] supports cellular and intestinal health. Stevia, a sugar alternative with few calories, is derived from the Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) plant.

Types Of Protein Powder

Before we dive into the five keto-friendly protein powders so that you can decide on your perfect keto protein powder, it is good we start by highlighting the various types of protein powders that you will encounter in your search.

First of all, protein powders are usually divided into three major categories: concentrates, isolates, and hydrolysates.

  • Concentrates of protein[13] are made by extracting the protein from entire foods with the help of heat, acid, or enzymes. These typically contain 60–80% protein, with the other 20–40% being made up of fat and carbohydrates.
  • Protein isolates[14] consist of further fat and carbohydrate filtration during a subsequent procedure, which concentrates the protein powder even more. Protein makes up 90–95 percent of protein isolate powders.
  • Hydrolysates of proteins[15] are when the bonds between amino acids are broken during further processing with acids or enzymes to create hydrolysates. Your system and muscles can absorb these products faster.

From these three categories, the other subsets of protein powders are

  • Whey protein powders:  Milk is the source of whey protein isolate, which is considered a fast-acting protein. Although it contains lactose, a milk sugar that some individuals find hard to digest, it is also abundant in protein. According to research,[16] whey protein powder can support the growth and maintenance of muscle mass, aid athletes in recovering from strenuous activity, and boost muscle strength in reaction to strength training.
  • Casein protein powders: Casein is also a milk protein. Casein protein powder is absorbed and processed much more slowly, though. When casein and gastric acid mix, a gel is created that slows stomach emptying and delays the uptake of amino acids into the bloodstream. Your muscles are exposed to amino acids more gradually and steadily as a result, which slows the rate of protein digestion in your muscles.
  • Egg protein powders: Egg whites instead of whole eggs are frequently used to make egg protein[17] powders. They offer all nine of the essential amino acids, which your body cannot produce on its own. For those who tend to favor an animal protein-based supplement but have dairy food allergies, egg-white protein might be a good option.
  • Pea protein powders: People who are vegetarians, vegans, or have dairy or egg intolerances or sensitivities are particularly fond of pea protein[18] powder. It is produced with yellow split peas, which are high in fiber and contain all but one of the essential amino acids. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are prevalent in these protein powders. Pea protein lacks methionine and cysteine, thus it is not a complete protein.
  • Hemp protein powder: Hemp protein[19] is a great source of necessary amino acids and healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Hemp is one of the few plant proteins that is a complete protein.
  • Brown rice protein powder: All of the necessary amino acids are present in brown rice protein[20] powders. However, there is not enough lysine to make it a complete protein. Strength, muscle recovery, and an improvement in body composition may all benefit.
  • Collagen protein powder: Collagen protein powders are the best for supplementing all connective tissues plus hair, nails, joints, ligaments, and even the skin. They are not complete proteins, however.
  • Mixed protein powders: They contain protein-rich ingredients like alfalfa,[21] artichoke, flax seeds, quinoa,[22] chia seeds, and more.

One thing to note is that these keto protein powders adhere to a keto lifestyle. Ideally, they are low carb diets or zero carbs, moderate protein, and high in healthy fats. To fit a ketogenic diet, they should also have low or zero sugars as part of the ingredient list. They may be vegan or non-vegan, depending on the type of protein used in the blend.

How We Selected The Best Keto Protein Shake

There is an infinite number of protein powders on the market today. Most of them claim they are the best low-carb protein powders for weight loss, muscle development, and other benefits.

So, to combine that number down to the best five we have just discussed, here are some of the criteria that we used to rank them.

  • The type of protein it has and its main purpose.
  • The protein quantity for a keto diet is 20% of your total calories and keto protein supplements typically contain 25-30g of protein for optimal repletion. The carbs quantity is set at 10-20 grams per day.
  • The added ingredients like sugars, flavors, and preservatives.
  • The diets the protein powder can fit in: vegan or non-vegan.
  • The product’s certifications include NSF sport, Vegan certified, and USDA certified.
  • The variety in flavors.

Final Thought

Whether you choose a chocolate peanut butter, vanilla caramel, or a salted caramel protein powder flavor is all up to you. But do not overlook the fundamentals, as selecting the optimum keto protein powder and keto diet pills go beyond the flavor. 

You must ensure that it fits into your ketogenic diet with low carbohydrates and healthy fats. And since it is a protein powder, protein content is also crucial.

You won’t be perplexed when selecting the best keto protein powder, as we’ve already discussed the top five protein powders. The fundamental rule is to follow your doctor’s recommendations when using these and other dietary supplements. 

That way, you lower the probability that the product won’t perform for you and minimize the chance that carelessness or inappropriate supplement use would have unfavorable impacts.

Even with supplements, it is better to be safe than sorry.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is protein powder OK for keto?

Yes, it is. As long as the carb count is low, healthy fats are high, and protein is moderate, then it fits a ketogenic diet. Protein should be 20% of your calories for the day. A gram of protein is 4 calories and on a 2000-calorie keto diet that equates to 75 grams of protein per day.

What should I look for in keto protein powder?

You should look for the carb, fat, and protein content. Also, look for the concentration and presence of other contents like gluten, GMO ingredients, sugar, artificial sweeteners, and allergens.

Does keto protein powder help you lose weight?

Yes, it does.

Can too much protein on keto cause weight gain?

Too much protein can offset your body’s ketosis state, implying that weight gain is one of the effects since you are not burning fat as you should when you are under ketosis.


+ 22 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

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Mitchelle Morgan

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

Mitchelle Morgan is a health and wellness writer with over 10 years of experience. She holds a Master's in Communication. Her mission is to provide readers with information that helps them live a better lifestyle. All her work is backed by scientific evidence to ensure readers get valuable and actionable content.

Medically reviewed by:

Kathy Shattler

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U.S. National Public Health Agency

U.S Department of Health and Human Services
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Trusted Source

Database from U.S. National Library of Medicine

U.S. Federal Government
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U.S. Food & Drug Administration

Federal Agency

U.S Department of Health and Human Services
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PubMed Central

Database From National Institute Of Health

U.S National Library of Medicine
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