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Plant Based Diet Meal Plan: Tips & Benefits In 2024

Grace Fullerton

Updated on - Written by
Medically reviewed by Chelsea Rae Bourgeois, MS, RDN, LD

plant based diet meal plan
Plant based diets include many foods like vegetables, grains, and legumes. Photo: Nhung Nguyen

You may be wondering what foods are included in a plant based diet meal plan. A plant-based diet can include a large variety of different foods. You do not have to be vegan or vegetarian to follow a plant-based diet. 

Some people on this diet eat strictly plant-based foods, while others eat primarily plant based foods occasionally including animal foods.

There are many reasons to start a plant based diet. Some people may use a plant based diet meal plan for weight loss or diabetes management. Others may simply want to live a healthier lifestyle. Keep reading to learn about the benefits of eating a plant-based diet.

Whole Food Plant-Based Diet Meal Plan For Seven Days

A plant-based meal plan can include many different foods. Here is a one-week meal plan that includes plant-forward meals. However, you can swap out any foods that you do not like for other plant-based foods. 

A couple of lunches repeat so you can meal prep at the beginning of the week.

Monday: Energizing and Satisfying (approx. 1045 calories)

The “Energizing and Satisfying” day plan is designed for those on a plant-based diet looking to enjoy a range of flavors and nutrients. Each meal is a blend of high-fiber carbohydrates, healthy fats, and plant-based proteins, ensuring sustained energy and satisfaction throughout the day. This plan is perfect for anyone seeking to explore the delicious possibilities of a plant-based lifestyle.

Breakfast
Chia seedsthree tbsp
Unsweetened almond milka cup
Fresh or frozen blueberriesa half cup
A dash of vanilla extract
Lunch
Chopped kalea cup
Cooked chickpeasa half cup
Cooked brown ricea half cup
Chopped cucumbera half cup
Shredded red cabbagea half cup
Tahini dressinga tbsp
Dinner
Vegan bean burger pattyone
Lettuce, tomato, onion for topping
Sesame bunone
Sweet potato wedgesa cup

Tuesday: Wholesome Green Gourmet (approx. 1276 calories)

The “Wholesome Green Gourmet” day plan offers a delightful variety of flavors and textures. Each meal is thoughtfully designed to provide key nutrients from plant-based sources, ensuring a balance of protein, healthy fats, and carbohydrates. This plan is ideal for those looking to embrace a plant-based lifestyle while enjoying a range of delicious and satisfying meals.

Breakfast
Crumbled tofua half cup
Diced potatoesa cup
Chopped tomatoesa half cup
Chopped red oniona quarter cup
Diced peppersa half cup
Lunch
Cooked lentilsa cup
Cooked white beansa half cup
Diced tomatoesa cup
Chopped carrots a half cup
Chopped celerya half cup
Sourdough breada slice
Cilantro for garnish
Dinner
Cooked whole-wheat spaghettitwo cups
Marinara saucea half cup
Spinacha cup
Halved cherry tomatoesa cup
Sliced zucchinia half cup
Olive oila tbsp

Wednesday: Nutrient-Rich and Flavorful (approx. 1303 calories)

The “Nutrient-Rich and Flavorful” day plan is a perfect representation of a balanced plant-based diet. It includes a variety of foods rich in essential nutrients, offering delightful tastes and textures. This plan is suitable for anyone seeking to enjoy the health benefits of plant-based eating without compromising on taste and satisfaction.

Breakfast
Oatsa half cup
Unsweetened almond milka cup
Flax seedsa tbsp
Chia seeds a tbsp
Natural peanut buttera tbsp
Medium appleone
Lunch
Chopped kalea cup
Cooked chickpeasa half cup
Cooked brown ricea half cup
Chopped cucumbera half cup
Shredded red cabbagea half cup
Tahini dressingtwo tbsp
Dinner
Ramen noodlestwo oz
Sliced mushrooms a cup
Chopped bok choya cup
Edamamea half cup
Bean sprouts and green onions for topping

Thursday: Hearty And Nourishing (approx. 1201 calories)

The “Hearty and Nourishing” day plan is perfect for individuals embracing a plant-based diet. Each meal is designed to provide lasting energy and satisfaction. The combination of avocado toast for breakfast and the hearty lentil and white bean soup for lunch and dinner ensures a balance of essential nutrients while keeping the meals exciting and flavorful. This meal plan is ideal for those seeking to maintain a balanced diet with plant-based ingredients.

Breakfast
Medium avocadoone
Whole wheat breadtwo slices
Nutritional yeasta tbsp
Red pepper flakes and sesame seedsa pinch
Lunch
Cooked lentilsa cup
Cooked white beansa half cup
Diced tomatoesa cup
Chopped cup carrots a half cup
Chopped celerya half cup
Cilantro for garnish
Sourdough breada slice
Dinner
Cooked chickpeasa cup
Chopped cauliflowera cup
Coconut milka half cup
Cooked jasmine ricea cup
Spices and herbs for currya tbsp

Friday: Plant-Powered Day (approx. 1100 calories)

Fuel your day with the goodness of plant-based nutrition! This meal plan is designed to provide a balanced intake of nutrients, featuring a chia-packed breakfast, a colorful and nutrient-rich Buddha bowl for lunch, and a satisfying chickpea pasta salad for dinner. You’ll enjoy a delicious variety of flavors while nourishing your body with essential vitamins and minerals.

Breakfast
Chia seedstwo tbsp
Unsweetened almond milka cup
Cocoa powdera tbsp
Fresh or frozen strawberriesa half cup
Lunch
Chopped kale two cups
Chickpeas, cooked and draineda half cup
Cooked brown ricea half cup
Chopped cucumber a half cup
Shredded red cabbagea quarter cup
Creamy tahini dressing(a tablespoon of tahini, a tablespoon of lemon juice,
tablespoon water, salt, and pepper to taste)
Dinner
Cooked chickpea pastatwo cups
Halved cherry tomatoesa cup
Diced bell pepper a half cup
Sliced black olivesa quarter cup
Finely chopped red oniontwo tbsp
Olive oila tbsp

Saturday: Veggie-Focused Vitality (approx. 1050 calories)

Embrace the vibrant world of plant-based eating with this wholesome meal plan. From a fruity and filling smoothie bowl for breakfast to a hearty lentil and white bean soup for lunch and a savory tofu stir-fry for dinner, this plan is designed to keep you nourished and satisfied while following a plant-based lifestyle.

Breakfast
Frozen bananaone
Frozen mixed berriesa half cup
Flax seedsa tbsp
Coconut or Greek yogurta half cup
Fresh fruit and granola for topping
Lunch
Rinsed and drained lentilsa cup
Canned or cooked white beansa cup
Diced tomatoestwo cups
Diced carrotsa cup
Diced celerya half cup
Fresh cilantro for topping
Sourdough toast (optional)
Dinner
Cubed tofueight oz
Broccoli floretsa cup
Sliced red pepper a half
Trimmed string beansa half cup
Brown rice for serving

Sunday: A Day of Nutrient-Rich Delights (approx. 1,298 calories)

Welcome to a day of delicious, nutritious, and wholesome plant-based meals that will nourish your body and satisfy your taste buds. This meal plan provides a balance of essential nutrients to support your health and energy levels throughout the day.

Breakfast
Whole wheat breadtwo slices
Natural peanut buttertwo tbsp
Medium sliced bananaone
Flax seedsa tbsp
Hemp heartsa tbsp
Cacao nibsa tbsp
Lunch
California sushi rollsix pieces
Steamed edamame beansa cup
Dinner
Large red bell pepperstwo
Cooked quinoaa half cup
Drained and rinsed canned black beansa half cup
Diced tomatoesa half cup
Diced oniontwo tbsp
Chopped cilantrotwo tbsp

What Is A Plant-Based Diet?

A plant-based diet is a way of eating where the majority of your diet is made up of plant-based foods. Plant-based diets can include meat, dairy, and eggs in moderation.

What Are The Benefits Of Plant-Based Eating

Plant-based diets can have many health benefits, including reduced risk of heart disease,[1] cancer risk, and cognitive decline.[2] However, primary health benefits appear to be weight management[3] and diabetes management.[4] 

Plant-based eating seems to lead to overall improved health, with the only potential downside[5] being a lack of protein and certain vitamins. First, let’s learn about Plant-Based diets.

Weight Management

A whole foods plant-based meal plan can help you lose weight. Photo: Asier Romero/Shutterstock

When people are trying to manage their weight, they often try to eat a healthy diet. Whether you’re striving to achieve weight gain or weight loss, meal planning with a focus on plant-based options can assist you in adhering to your goals. 

Research shows that a whole foods plant based diet meal plan can help you lose weight.

Additionally, a 2014 review[3] of randomized control trials revealed that vegetarian diets offer more weight loss benefits than diets that include meat.  

Researchers in 2020 and 2021 reviewed the available research for all different types of plant-based diets. These reviews found that plant-based diets typically had lower calorie density,[6] fat levels,[7] and cholesterol than non-plant-based diets. 

These differences resulted in weight loss and reduced obesity levels.

Diabetes Management

plant based diet meal plan
If you adhere to a plant-based diet for diabetes, it may help prevent or manage the condition. Photo: Africa Studio/Shutterstock

Diabetes can be a life-changing diagnosis. However, if you adhere to a plant-based diet for diabetes, it may help prevent or manage the condition. Research indicates[8] that a vegetarian diet may help regulate glucose levels, lower cholesterol levels, and regulate body weight in people with diabetes. 

These effects could make the vegetarian diet a beneficial tool for managing diabetes and other chronic diseases.

Another study[9] showed that adherence to a plant-based diet reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The individuals who more closely adhered to a plant-based diet had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes than individuals who only loosely adhered to plant-based eating.

Researchers[10] also reported a lower incidence of type 2 diabetes cases in populations that ate a healthy plant-based diet. The

Tips For People On A Plant-Based Diet Plan

Research[5] indicates that people who follow vegan recipes for a plant-based diet may struggle to get an adequate amount of the following nutrients: protein, B vitamins, omega-3s, iron, niacin, iodine, zinc, calcium, and vitamin D. 

Some vegans choose to use dietary supplements to fill in these nutritional gaps. 

Researchers argue that adding small amounts of animal-based products to a plant-based diet allows for many of the same benefits as a vegan plant-based diet but reduces the risk of nutritional deficiencies. 

This is because foods like seafood, meats, dairy, and eggs are rich in protein, B vitamins, omega-3s, iron, calcium, and niacin.

If you are committed to this diet and do not want to eat any animal products, there are a variety of supplements for a plant-based diet that can help fulfill your nutritional needs. 

For example, vegan protein bars and protein powder options are available to supplement your protein needs. 

If you are following any special diet or are concerned about your nutrition, consulting with a registered dietitian is wise. A registered dietitian can help you create a plant-based meal plan for weight loss or weight gain.

Recommended Foods For A Plant Based Diet Plan

Different versions of plant-based diets recommend different foods. Some common variations of plant-based diets include vegetarian, vegan, pescatarian, and flexitarian.

If you want to reap the rewards of a plant-based diet, experts recommend[11] avoiding foods high in sugar and saturated fats, even if they are plant-based.

Vegetarian

On a vegetarian diet, recommended[11] foods could include any food besides meat and seafood. Eating vegetarian does not necessarily mean you get most of your food from plants. 

If you want to get the benefits of a plant-based diet, you should eat primarily plant foods with a moderate amount of dairy products and eggs.

Vegan

The vegan diet excludes all animal-derived foods, meaning it is 100% plant-based. Getting all of the necessary nutrients from plant foods can be difficult. 

For this reason, experts recommend[11] that vegans be intentional about including foods abundant in protein, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D.

Pescatarian For A Plant-Based Diet Plan

The pescatarian diet[11] is basically a vegetarian diet that includes seafood. In other words, pescatarians do not eat meat and poultry but do eat fish, seafood, dairy, and eggs. 

In order for the pescatarian diet to be plant-based, the majority of the foods consumed should be plant-based, with a moderate amount of seafood, dairy products, and eggs.

Flexitarian

The term flexitarian typically refers to someone who adheres to a vegetarian diet a majority of the time but occasionally eats meat and seafood. Some researchers[5] argue that a diet like this, which they call an omnivorous plant-based diet, is the best option for balancing nutritional needs.

Summary

Plant-based diets can incorporate many different types of food, including meat and other animal products, in moderation. A plant-based diet can help you manage your weight and diabetes. Additionally, plant-based diet benefits include contributions to disease prevention.

If you are adhering to a plant-based diet, pay special attention to the amount of protein, B vitamins, omega-3s, iron, niacin, iodine, zinc, calcium, and vitamin D in your diet. 

Ask your registered dietitian for guidance on how plant-based ingredients can help you reach your health goals. And in the meantime, consider meal planning and writing an updated shopping list!

Frequently Asked Questions

What foods do you eat on a plant-based diet?

On a plant-based diet, you primarily eat foods like vegetables, fruits, legumes, and grains. You may completely avoid or limit animal foods like meat, seafood, dairy, and eggs.

Can you eat eggs on a plant-based diet?

On some plant-based diets, such as vegetarian, flexitarian, and pescatarian diets, you can eat eggs, but if you follow a vegan diet, then you cannot eat eggs.

Can I eat cheese on a plant-based diet?

On some plant-based diets, such as vegetarian, flexitarian, and pescatarian diets, you can eat cheese. However, if you follow a vegan diet, you cannot eat cheese.

Can I eat bread on a plant-based diet?

Yes, people on a plant-based diet can eat bread. Bread is typically made from all plant ingredients, such as wheat flour, water, and oil.


+ 11 sources

Health Canal avoids using tertiary references. We have strict sourcing guidelines and rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic researches from medical associations and institutions. To ensure the accuracy of articles in Health Canal, you can read more about the editorial process here

  1. Zuo Xian Gan, Huey Fen Cheong, Tu, Y.-K. and Kuo, P.-H. (2021). Association between Plant-Based Dietary Patterns and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. [online] 13(11), pp.3952–3952. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113952.
  2. Jiang, X., Huang, J., Song, D., Deng, R., Wei, J. and Zhang, Z. (2017). Increased Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables Is Related to a Reduced Risk of Cognitive Impairment and Dementia: Meta-Analysis. [online] 9. doi:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2017.00018.
  3. Huang, R., Huang, C.-C., Hu, F.B. and Chavarro, J.E. (2015). Vegetarian Diets and Weight Reduction: a Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. [online] 31(1), pp.109–116. doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-015-3390-7.
  4. Wright, N.A., Wilson, L.R., Smith, K., Duncan, B.N. and McHugh, P.E. (2017). The BROAD study: A randomised controlled trial using a whole food plant-based diet in the community for obesity, ischaemic heart disease or diabetes. [online] 7(3), pp.e256–e256. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/nutd.2017.3.
  5. O’Keefe, J.H., O’Keefe, E.L., Lavie, C.J. and Cordain, L. (2022). Debunking the vegan myth: The case for a plant-forward omnivorous whole-foods diet. [online] 74, pp.2–8. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcad.2022.08.001.
  6. Ivanova, S., Delattre, C., Karcheva-Bahchevanska, D., Niko Benbasat, Vanya Nalbantova and Ivanov, K. (2021). Plant-Based Diet as a Strategy for Weight Control. [online] 10(12), pp.3052–3052. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10123052.
  7. Tran, E., Hanna Fjeldheim Dale, Jensen, C. and Gülen Arslan Lied (2020). Effects of Plant-Based Diets on Weight Status: A Systematic Review. [online] Volume 13, pp.3433–3448. doi:https://doi.org/10.2147/dmso.s272802.
  8. Viguiliouk, E., Cyril W.C. Kendall, Kahleova, H., Rahelić, D., Jordi Salas-Salvadó, Choo, V.L., Sonia Blanco Mejia, Stewart, S.T., Raz, I., David J.A. Jenkins and Sievenpiper, J.L. (2019). Effect of vegetarian dietary patterns on cardiometabolic risk factors in diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. [online] 38(3), pp.1133–1145. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clnu.2018.05.032.
  9. Qian, F., Liu, G., Hu, F.B. and Bhupathiraju, S.N. (2019). Association Between Plant-Based Dietary Patterns and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes. [online] 179(10), pp.1335–1335. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2195.
  10. Ambika Satija, Bhupathiraju, S.N., Rimm, E.B., Spiegelman, D., Chiuve, S.E., Borgi, L., Willett, W.C., Manson, J.E. and Hu, F.B. (2016). Plant-Based Dietary Patterns and Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes in US Men and Women: Results from Three Prospective Cohort Studies. [online] 13(6), pp.e1002039–e1002039. doi:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002039.
  11. Clem, J. and Barthel, B. (2021). A Look at Plant-Based Diets. Missouri medicine, [online] 118(3), pp.233–238. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8210981/.
Grace Fullerton

Medically reviewed by:

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

Grace Fullerton is a Health Writer based in Buffalo, New York specializing in mental health and nutrition. She earned a BA in Psychology from Austin College and is currently completing her Master's Degree in School Psychology at SUNY Buffalo. Outside of school and work Grace enjoys weightlifting, cooking, and volunteering at her local dog shelter.

Medically reviewed by:

Chelsea Rae Bourgeois

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